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Julia Sweeney

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1992 | LAUREN LIPTON
If there is one thing Julia Sweeney is good at, it's analysis. "This is what I go through," explains the comic actress, who portrays the androgynous Pat on "Saturday Night Live," of the way she critiques her own work. "First I either think my performance is good or bad. Then I watch it (on TV) and hate myself so much I can't believe I inhabit my body. Then six months later I watch it and think, 'Oh, that's not so bad.' So it takes, like, seven months to get through it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist
Julia Sweeney jokes first and thinks about it later. Luckily, her daughter and husband share her sense of humor (mostly). Best known for her stint on "Saturday Night Live" -- she was under the androgynous Pat's fat suit -- Sweeney has become a successful writer, in addition to continuing to perform onstage.  She brings her hilarious, intimate new book, "If It's Not One Thing, It's Your Mother, " to Book Soup at 7 tonight. She may read about her hatred of huge strollers, being mistaken for her daughter's grandmother and the misadventures of hiring a nanny.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The phrase "as comfortable as old shoes" certainly applies to Julia Sweeney. That's not damning with faint praise, either. In fact, after all her years in "the business," it's remarkable that Sweeney has so completely avoided the endemic industry snare of artifice and self-importance. That virtue is evident in "In the Family Way," Sweeney's one-woman show about her adoption of a Chinese girl. The show is now in its West Coast premiere at the Groundlings Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2005 | AL MARTINEZ
I was walking along the beach the other day when a bearded old hippie with an unlit cigarette in his mouth asked if I had a light. When I said no, he shrugged as though it didn't make any difference anyhow and snapped his fingers. And suddenly, the cigarette lit on its own. It was a surreal moment, I kid you not, until an aura around the man began to brighten and I realized it was God. He pops up once in a while in strange places and in different forms to keep in touch with us errant humans.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | KARI GRANVILLE
As a parodist, actress Julia Sweeney has a keen eye for the ironies and absurdities of life, even if the life happens to be her own: An accountant tries out for a comedy troupe, becomes a local star and gets discovered by "Saturday Night Live." All because she lacked management skills. When Sweeney left Seattle for Hollywood with degrees in European history and economics, all she wanted from show business was a vice presidency in some studio's business affairs department.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | James Verini, Special to The Times
Julia SWEENEY'S unassuming bungalow on the southern fringe of Hollywood is lined with books. Walking into her living room, one wonders if Sweeney, the former "Saturday Night Live" cast member, is planning on becoming an adjunct professor or opening a stall at the Fairfax flea market. She's not, it turns out -- she just likes to read. "I've reorganized," she announces, showing me around. "Here is where I keep my favorite novels now," she says, motioning to a 15-foot-long wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Comedian Julia Sweeney describes the moment when "God Said, 'Ha!' " in her wonderfully told one-woman show of that title. She had just gone through a divorce she characterizes as amicable, which is believable, considering her warm and non-confrontational persona. So she moved into a small house in Los Angeles and dreamed of the sophisticated dinner parties and happy single life that were to come. And then, and then. And then her brother Mike was diagnosed with stage-four lymphatic cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1995 | Chuck Crisafulli, Chuck Crisafulli is a regular contributor to Calendar
'Basically, this was the year that I became Job," Julia Sweeney says with a bemused shrug. The 35-year- old comedian and actress, perhaps best known for her four seasons with "Saturday Night Live," has indeed been through an Old Testament-worthy assortment of tribulations during the last 15 months. She has also discovered that her natural ability to create comedy from life's most cruel and frightening moments is one of her greatest survival skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1993 | DAVID J. FOX, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Crying Pat: There was talk on Friday that "Saturday Night Live's" asexual character Pat (played by Julia Sweeney) will open tonight's show with a parody of the Oscar-nominated hit movie "The Crying Game," which itself is about sexual illusion. The he/she Pat was said to be rehearsing a rendition of the movie's title song as the TV cameras reveal two of the film's stars, Miranda Richardson and Stephen Rea--but a spokeswoman for "SNL" would not confirm.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994
Jim Emerson's "I, Screenwriter" (Sept. 11) exemplified the politics of the "it's who -you-know-not- what -you-know" complaint heard around town. Emerson basically says that he had no experience writing films, had a rotten pitch and yet--thanks to Julia Sweeney--found himself in the position of being a screenwriter on an $8-million comedy for Touchstone. Discussing the development process as a befuddled outsider might be amusing for him, but for those of us who take the craft of screenwriting seriously, Emerson's bafflement is a bad joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004 | Diane Haithman
Julia SWEENEY'S solo show "Letting Go of God," which usually plays at Hollywood's Hudson Backstage Theatre on Friday and Saturday evenings and Sundays at 3 p.m., will not be presented on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve, which both fall on a Friday. But Sweeney will perform it on Christmas and New Year's. The actress says the creative forces behind her skewering of organized religion thought: "How fun would it be to do it on Christmas -- a show that celebrates no God at all?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The phrase "as comfortable as old shoes" certainly applies to Julia Sweeney. That's not damning with faint praise, either. In fact, after all her years in "the business," it's remarkable that Sweeney has so completely avoided the endemic industry snare of artifice and self-importance. That virtue is evident in "In the Family Way," Sweeney's one-woman show about her adoption of a Chinese girl. The show is now in its West Coast premiere at the Groundlings Theatre.
NEWS
May 1, 2003 | James Verini, Special to The Times
Julia SWEENEY'S unassuming bungalow on the southern fringe of Hollywood is lined with books. Walking into her living room, one wonders if Sweeney, the former "Saturday Night Live" cast member, is planning on becoming an adjunct professor or opening a stall at the Fairfax flea market. She's not, it turns out -- she just likes to read. "I've reorganized," she announces, showing me around. "Here is where I keep my favorite novels now," she says, motioning to a 15-foot-long wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Mordant, up-to-the-minute wit fuels "City of the Future," scampering about the Groundlings Theater. This latest showcase from Los Angeles' celebrated comedy troupe is consistently twisted and often uproarious. One factor is director Patrick Bristow's swift deployment of his gonzo ensemble. These writer-performers (with alternates) scramble past the odd flat-footed bit or ad lib with patented ease. Their politically incorrect energy carries the evening, with an emphasis on grotesquerie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1999
Cantor Jonathan Grant isn't just any old cantor. He's also an operatic singer. Since joining Temple Bat Yahm five years ago, he's staged a concert each year. This time around, he'll share the bill for "To Life! Songs of Celebration" with Tony-winner Nell Carter and Rabbi Jay Levy, who produced and performed on Carter's "To Life! Songs of Chanukah and Other Jewish Celebrations" recording. "To Life! Songs of Celebration," Temple Bat Yahm, 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | SAUL RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Julia Sweeney's life was thrown into turmoil five years ago, it seemed as if a supreme being was playing a joke at her expense. So she laughed right back. The result was "God Said, 'Ha!'," a comic and poignant stage show that put a rosy spin on a gloomy period when both she and her brother Mike were diagnosed with cancer, and her parents invaded her cozy Larchmont-area bungalow for nine months to monitor them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's Pat" offers a simple message of self-acceptance, asserting that what counts is who you are rather than what your gender may or may not be. The trouble is that its telling is truly terrible: no wonder Touchstone took it off its release schedule some months ago. It now winds up, starting this weekend, as a Friday and Saturday midnight show at the Sunset 5.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | GLENN DOGGRELL, Glenn Doggrell writes about comedy for the Times Orange County Edition.
Getting together with an old friend shouldn't have to be like this. The last time Julia Sweeney and Cheri Kerr saw each other was in January, in Los Angeles at a benefit for Sweeney's younger brother Michael who is suffering from lymphoma cancer and has no medical insurance. On Saturday, the women are getting together again, this time in Orange County, for the same reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By 1994, life was looking up for comedian Julia Sweeney. She had just completed a run on "Saturday Night Live" that brought her national acclaim and recognition (particularly for her androgynous character Pat), came to an amicable parting of ways with her husband and, best of all, bought her dream house, a small home in Hollywood. That's when, to borrow the apt title of her heart-wrenching yet funny one-woman stage show, "God Said, 'Ha!'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997
Friday: There are two Meccas in Hollywood, each a triumvirate: 1. Virgin Megastore/Sunset 5 Theatres/Wolfgang Puck or 2. Tower Records/Tower Classical/Book Soup. It's always a tossup, the deciding factor being whether you want to see a movie or buy some books. Saturday: I can't miss "Car Talk" on 89.3 KPCC at 9 a.m. Then spinning class at Todd Tramps or yoga at the Yoga Center in Larchmont. I love to shop along Larchmont and eat at Prado.
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