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Julia Tavalaro

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MAGAZINE
January 28, 1996
It must be everyone's worst nightmare--to be trapped inside an unresponsive body, experiencing the world outside but unable to communicate with it ("It's an Incredible Life," by Richard E. Meyer, Dec. 17). That Julia Tavalaro survived her hell on earth for many years and triumphed over her profound disabilities is phenomenal and inspiring. Her story should be required reading for all health-care personnel and family members of those similarly afflicted. How different it would have been had Julia been treated with gentle respect--if her caregivers had spoken to her and explained things, handled her physical needs with dignity, truly listened to her and her family and provided an attractive and stimulating environment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Julia Tavalaro, who became the subject of magazine and newspaper stories and a book after she spent six years so paralyzed that people thought she was not cognizant, died Friday. She was 68. During the six years, she was unable to let anyone know she was aware. Her senses were intact. She could understand, remember and think. She felt sadness, happiness and anger. But she was helpless. She could move her head and eyes, but the movements were hardly noticeable. And she could not speak.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Julia Tavalaro, who became the subject of magazine and newspaper stories and a book after she spent six years so paralyzed that people thought she was not cognizant, died Friday. She was 68. During the six years, she was unable to let anyone know she was aware. Her senses were intact. She could understand, remember and think. She felt sadness, happiness and anger. But she was helpless. She could move her head and eyes, but the movements were hardly noticeable. And she could not speak.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 1996
It must be everyone's worst nightmare--to be trapped inside an unresponsive body, experiencing the world outside but unable to communicate with it ("It's an Incredible Life," by Richard E. Meyer, Dec. 17). That Julia Tavalaro survived her hell on earth for many years and triumphed over her profound disabilities is phenomenal and inspiring. Her story should be required reading for all health-care personnel and family members of those similarly afflicted. How different it would have been had Julia been treated with gentle respect--if her caregivers had spoken to her and explained things, handled her physical needs with dignity, truly listened to her and her family and provided an attractive and stimulating environment.
MAGAZINE
December 17, 1995 | Richard E. Meyer, Richard E. Meyer is a national correspondent for The Times. His last article for the magazine was on Loving County in West Texas
Julia Tavalaro heard her baby whimper, then sob, then cry. It was an omen. She had just tucked Judy, who was 14 months old, into her little yellow pajamas and put her to bed. Her husband, George, was in the den watching a ballgame. Julia went to the living room fireplace and stood quietly, as she did sometimes to find strength, especially when she had one of her headaches. Fondly she thought back to Judy's first birthday. There would be a party for her second one, too: hats, noisemakers . . .
NEWS
May 31, 1996
Times staff writer Richard E. Meyer has won the magazine reporting prize in the Society of Professional Journalists' 1995 Sigma Delta Chi journalism awards. Meyer's award, announced Thursday by the society, recognizes his Dec. 17 cover story for the Los Angeles Times Magazine on Julia Tavalaro, a woman paralyzed so severely by a stroke that she is able to communicate only through slight eye and head movements. To tell Tavalaro's story, Meyer spent nearly 450 hours interviewing her.
MAGAZINE
December 17, 1995 | Richard E. Meyer, Richard E. Meyer is a national correspondent for The Times. His last article for the magazine was on Loving County in West Texas
Julia Tavalaro heard her baby whimper, then sob, then cry. It was an omen. She had just tucked Judy, who was 14 months old, into her little yellow pajamas and put her to bed. Her husband, George, was in the den watching a ballgame. Julia went to the living room fireplace and stood quietly, as she did sometimes to find strength, especially when she had one of her headaches. Fondly she thought back to Judy's first birthday. There would be a party for her second one, too: hats, noisemakers . . .
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