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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Feb. 3 - 9, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     The Real Estate Story Housing in Los Angeles and nationwide: Madison Hildebrand. (N) 3 a.m. - 5 p.m. Fox Business CBS This Morning Kat Cole, Cinnabon. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Tiffany Thiessen; Jane Pauley. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Madeleine Stowe; Bethenny Frankel; Dale Earnhardt Jr.; Kendall and Kylie Jenner. (N)
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NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
If you've ever wanted to read a 20,000-word story about Edward Snowden, you'll get your chance pretty soon. The former National Security Agency contractor -- and currently world-famous intelligence leaker -- has been granting more and more interviews since he absconded with agency documents and sought asylum in Russia last year after sharing those documents with journalists. Idolized and reviled by many, one of Snowden's newest appearances in the spotlight will come in a long narrative story about his leak (and life thereafter)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Rene Perez Joglar, a.k.a. Residente, outspoken lead singer of the multiple Latin Grammy-winning, politically activist band Calle 13, is teaming up with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on a songwriting session that's intended to strike a blow for free speech and against censorship, "disinformation and media manipulation," according to a statement released by Calle 13's publicist. Perez told his 5 million Twitter followers that he met with Assange on Wednesday night at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where Assange has been confined for several months while law authorities seek to extradite him to Sweden in a sexual assault case.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez has been hospitalized in Mexico City, the Associated Press reports . The author, known colloquially as Gabo, is 87 years old. According to some news sources, Garcia Marquez has been hospitalized with pneumonia. His family has asked that no details of his condition be released. He last made a public appearance on March 6, his 87th birthday, outside his Mexico City home. The president of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto, wished Gabo "a speedy recovery" on his Twitter feed.
WORLD
February 9, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange continually avoided interview requests from Swedish authorities who wanted to question him about allegations that he sexually abused two women last summer, a British prosecutor said Tuesday. Assange's apparent reluctance to be interviewed made him a flight risk and justified the move to arrest him, a London courtroom heard on the second day of a hearing to decide whether the 39-year-old Australian should be extradited from Britain to Sweden. But Assange's lawyers said their client was difficult to reach not out of a desire to avoid interrogation but because he essentially went underground in September after his website leaked thousands of U.S. military documents and sparked official condemnation and threats of retaliation.
WORLD
August 16, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Britain doesn't want him. Ecuador does. Therein lies a very large rub. A tense diplomatic faceoff grew uglier Thursday after Ecuador announced it was granting political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of the whistle-blowing WikiLeaks website who has been holed up for the last two months in its embassy in an upscale London neighborhood. Officials in Quito say Assange faces political persecution for releasing confidential documents embarrassing to the U.S. and other governments, and demanded that he be given safe passage out of Britain.
WORLD
February 12, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
A lawyer for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Friday accused Sweden's prime minister of creating a "toxic atmosphere" that made a fair hearing for his client on sexual-abuse allegations impossible. Attorney Geoffrey Robertson told a London courtroom that recent comments by Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt had turned Assange into "public enemy No. 1" in the Scandinavian nation. Reinfeldt had gone on record sharply criticizing attempts by Assange's defense team to discredit his country's legal system.
WORLD
February 7, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Lawyers for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange argued Monday that their client should not be extradited to Sweden for questioning over alleged sex crimes, saying he was the victim of unduly aggressive prosecutors and would not be guaranteed a fair trial. On the opening day of a two-day hearing, Assange's legal team sought to downplay the severity of the molestation and rape accusations against him and to cast doubt on the credibility and authority of the Swedish prosecutor seeking his extradition, calling a witness who referred to her as an "ultra-radical feminist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
When director Alex Gibney began work on his documentary "We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks," he thought he would be telling the story of a charismatic, silver-haired free speech advocate named Julian Assange, who had exposed dark corners of powerful governments and corporations using little more than his laptop. Instead, as he began to investigate, Gibney found himself crafting a digital age Icarus tale, in which the WikiLeaks founder's idealism and ambition were metastasizing into hubris, and his organization's greatest achievements rested on the shoulders of a lonely young Army private named Bradley Manning.
OPINION
December 22, 2010
According to a classified and unusually salacious Swedish police report obtained by the Guardian newspaper, WikiLeaks mastermind Julian Assange went to dinner in August with a woman identified only as "Ms. A. " When they returned to her Stockholm apartment, he began stroking her leg. Then, although she says she thought things were moving too quickly and uncomfortably, he was pulling off her clothes and snapping her jewelry. According to her complaint, he pinned her arms and legs to stop her from reaching for a condom.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Rush Universal, $29.98; Blu-ray, $34.98 Available on VOD beginning Jan. 28 Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan tell the story of 1970s Formula 1 racing stars James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Brühl) in "Rush," a true-sports adventure that starts out as a "the olden days were groovy" corn-fest, then takes a turn for the better. The second half of the film concerns itself mostly with the incredibly tight points-battle between Hunt and Lauda throughout the 1976 season, and those racing sequences - some of which were shot with a subjective camera, in bad weather conditions - are white-knuckle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
Dr. Alan Turing, the World War II-era British codebreaker who is often said to be the father of the modern computer, received a posthumous royal pardon Tuesday, close to 60 years after he committed suicide. The pardon's announcement comes during post-production of Black Bear Pictures' “The Imitation Game.” StudioCanal will release the film in late 2014, film producer Teddy Schwarzman wrote in an email Tuesday. Actor Benedict Cumberbatch portrays Turing, opposite Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode and Mark Strong.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan
In its own Hollywood way, "The Fifth Estate" is quite an ambitious film. It wants to create a viable portrait of Julian Assange, the wildly controversial founder of WikiLeaks, dramatize the significant but complex questions his work raises and surround both of those themes with the kind of personal dramas so beloved by mainstream films. The surprise in this film, starring actor-of-the-moment Benedict Cumberbatch as Assange and Daniel Brühl as his associate Daniel Domscheit-Berg and directed by Bill Condon, is not that all of these goals are met - that would be too much to expect - but which ones are successful and which ones prove to be beyond everyone's grasp.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
This post has been updated. Please see bottom for details. Will "Carrie" pull "Gravity" back down to earth this weekend? Since making its debut two weeks ago, Alfonso Cuaron's "Gravity" has proved to be a favorite at the box office, raking in $136 million. This weekend, say those who have seen pre-release audience surveys, the film starring Sandra Bullock will likely collect between $30 million and $35 million more. That weekend sum would put the space epic in a tight race for No. 1 with a remake of the horror classic "Carrie," which is set to open at around $33 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
If sports stories often fascinate for the ways in which they form distilled metaphors for human existence -- the thrill of victory, the agony of defeat and everything in between -- the saga of Lance Armstrong is particularly intriguing as an examination of public deception, conspiracy and how we are all susceptible to believing our own hype. The first trailer for Alex Gibney's documentary "The Armstrong Lie" finds the Oscar-winning filmmaker sparring with the disgraced cyclist. Gibney originally set out to make a film called "The Road Back" that would chronicle seven-time-winner Armstrong's comeback to the Tour de France in 2009 after having survived cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By John Horn
“The Fifth Estate” is Bill Condon's new movie about celebrity and journalism in the Internet age, and it isn't about Miley Cyrus' blog posts. Instead, the subjects of the director's cameras are Julian Assange and WikiLeaks, a fictional companion piece to Alex Gibney's documentary “We Steal Secrets.” Critics were less than overwhelmed by the film at the Toronto International Film Festival, which “The Fifth Estate” opened Thursday night. WATCH: Toronto International Film Festival 2013 trailers While reviewers found plenty to like in the movie, including star Benedict Cumberbatch's performance as Assange, they felt that the plot (the script is by “West Wing” veteran Josh Singer)
NATIONAL
December 22, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
The Army intelligence analyst accused of being responsible for one of the largest public dumps of classified information in U.S. history chatted online with the founder of WikiLeaks while he was uploading files to the WikiLeaks website, military prosecutors said Thursday. During closing arguments in the pretrial hearing of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, prosecutors flashed excerpts of chat logs to the courtroom that they alleged showed WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange coaching Manning on how to decode computer passwords to access secret Army computers under someone else's name.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
"We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks" may be a documentary, but director Alex Gibney gives the film the feel of a propulsive espionage techno-thriller played out in the real world. The movie is in some sense two films in one. It's partly a study of the well-known Julian Assange, who captured the world's attention when his WikiLeaks website made volumes of sensitive U.S. government material available online, sparking a firestorm of controversy over secrecy and freedom of information in the digital age. But viewers may be less familiar with Bradley Manning, the low-level Army intelligence analyst who provided Assange with his most daring cache of documents and is soon to begin a court-martial stemming from those activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO -- It's fitting that the Toronto International Film Festival opened its 2013 edition Thursday night with the Wikileaks drama "The Fifth Estate. " That's true because the Bill Condon movie about Julian Assange is an elaborate Hollywood production with a layer of seriousness -- "interested in what makes people tick," as TIFF's Cameron Bailey described its director before the screening -- and Toronto tends to like elaborate Hollywood productions with a layer of seriousness. But it's also true because the moviegoing season that Toronto unofficially kicks off is going to be filled with movies like this -- based on complicated real-life personalities, and trying, with admittedly varying degrees of success, to tell us as much about ourselves as about them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Lost at sea, lost in space, lost children, lost freedom, lost homeland, lost money, lost identity, lost jobs, lost hope, lost faith, lost lives: This fall, this is film. This is serious. I can't wait. September always brings a change in the temperature of what we see on screen. The Oscar contenders start showing up, the significant films with more to consider than, say, "The Wolverine" or "World War Z. " As much popcorn fun as "Wolverine," "War" and the like might be, they don't ask much of us. Not so the fall.
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