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Julian Barnes

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Richard Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pulse Stories Julian Barnes Alfred A. Knopf: 227 pp., $25 Of our leading novelists, Julian Barnes has one of the richest historical imaginations. "Flaubert's Parrot" (the title is more or less self-explanatory) and "Arthur & George" (based on a true incident in which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle came to the rescue of an Anglo-Indian lawyer falsely accused of a heinous crime) are smoothly seductive masterpieces, which conclusively demonstrate the writer's ability to reconstruct the past in an utterly unselfconscious, entirely persuasive manner.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
The Sense of an Ending A Novel Julian Barnes Alfred A Knopf: 165 pp., $23.95
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BOOKS
October 15, 1989 | ALEXANDER STUART, Stuart is a British novelist and critic. His profile of Julkkian Barnes is condensed from a longer one that appeared in Time Out. a British magazine. and
Julian Barnes' latest book is called "A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters" (see review, Page 3). Here is a history of the man himself, similarly dissected. (1) Barnes has a fondness for playing around with form, for itemizing and annotating, analyzing and decoding. Yet his books and his manner are anything but professional. He has charm. He has wit. He has . . . (2) Beetles. What is it with this man and beetles?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Evelyn Waugh sent the manuscript of "Brideshead Revisited" to his friend and fellow novelist Nancy Mitford, her response was enthusiastic, except for wishing that his protagonist was less dim and had a little more glamour. But, of course, Waugh was making a conscious artistic decision, and Julian Barnes has made a similar choice in his brief novel, which Tuesday was awarded England's Man Booker Prize. Tony Webster, the middle-aged, middle-class, middle-of-the-road narrator of "The Sense of an Ending," has few illusions about himself or the safe path he has chosen.
BOOKS
April 5, 1987 | Richard Eder
Imagine a fictional blend of "Tristram Shandy," "Brave New World" and Flaubert's tale, "A Simple Heart." Or don't, maybe. You could argue that there are suggestions of all three in Julian Barnes' "Staring at the Sun." But mixing such vastly different hues produces brown, and Barnes is never brown. He is the English author of "Flaubert's Parrot."
BOOKS
July 11, 2004 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short-story collection "Stealing the Fire," a contributing editor to Parade magazine and will be distinguished writer in residence at Knox College this fall.
Julian BARNES has long had a fascination with aging and death. "I am now older than Flaubert ever was," points out middle-aged Geoffrey Braithwaite, the narrator of "Flaubert's Parrot," the audacious novel-as-faux-literary-investigation that put Barnes on the literary map 20 years ago. "It seemed a presumptuous thing to be; sad and unmerited. Is there ever a right time to die?"
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
Without slighting the work of Alan Ayckbourne, Simon Gray and a half-dozen other dexterous playwrights, we may now have the ultimate example of their specialty: British drawing-room comedy, Postwar Version. A word about Postwar Version. It uses a hydroponic drawing-room. Above, is the contemporary chic of manners and customs, below, is all water. The water is full of piranhas. Above, all ironic sensibilities; below, all churning bloody carnage.
BOOKS
March 17, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
In the 1860s, a bourgeois family takes a Sunday excursion out of Rouen to gawk at an encampment of British laborers engaged in building the railroad line from Paris. The red-faced giants are reported to shovel 20 tons of earth apiece each day and to devour 12 pounds of beef. A bluff Englishman of the John Bull variety falls into conversation at a Paris bar in the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
The Sense of an Ending A Novel Julian Barnes Alfred A Knopf: 165 pp., $23.95
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Richard Schickel, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Pulse Stories Julian Barnes Alfred A. Knopf: 227 pp., $25 Of our leading novelists, Julian Barnes has one of the richest historical imaginations. "Flaubert's Parrot" (the title is more or less self-explanatory) and "Arthur & George" (based on a true incident in which Sir Arthur Conan Doyle came to the rescue of an Anglo-Indian lawyer falsely accused of a heinous crime) are smoothly seductive masterpieces, which conclusively demonstrate the writer's ability to reconstruct the past in an utterly unselfconscious, entirely persuasive manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2008 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
The perfect epigraph for "Nothing to Be Frightened Of" would be the haunting Latin refrain which concludes each stanza of a poem by the 15th century Scottish writer William Dunbar: "Timor Mortis conturbat me." ("The fear of death distresses me.") It is certainly the leitmotif that runs through this odd book -- part family memoir, part meditation on death and dying -- by British novelist Julian Barnes.
BOOKS
January 15, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
THESE days, the formidable Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) suffers the curious fate of being less famous than his fictional creation Sherlock Holmes. This, however, was not always so.
BOOKS
July 11, 2004 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short-story collection "Stealing the Fire," a contributing editor to Parade magazine and will be distinguished writer in residence at Knox College this fall.
Julian BARNES has long had a fascination with aging and death. "I am now older than Flaubert ever was," points out middle-aged Geoffrey Braithwaite, the narrator of "Flaubert's Parrot," the audacious novel-as-faux-literary-investigation that put Barnes on the literary map 20 years ago. "It seemed a presumptuous thing to be; sad and unmerited. Is there ever a right time to die?"
BOOKS
February 9, 2003 | Benita Eisler, Benita Eisler is the author of "Byron: Child of Passion, Fool of Fame," which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award in biography in 1999, and the forthcoming "Chopin's Funeral."
Reflections on sickness, as warning of our own mortality or as metaphor of civilization's sins, began with the biblical plagues. Three recently published books, whose writing spans a full century from 1887 to 1987, remind us that illness is a period piece. Time and place define our maladies, along with their treatments, determining how dire is our case and, crucially, who shall be saved. Struggling to find a language of sickness, one not hobbled by metaphor, all writers acknowledge defeat.
NEWS
March 12, 2001 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Fiction," says Julian Barnes, "is as intimate as sex." Certainly his new novel, "Love, etc.," pushes the relationship between the reader and the characters to an intimate point. Even authors Milan Kundera and Vladimir Nabokov, master manipulators, do not leave their readers talking about their characters as if they were people one knows. In "Love, etc.," the characters ask us questions. They answer questions we haven't asked, out loud, anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011 | By Martin Rubin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Evelyn Waugh sent the manuscript of "Brideshead Revisited" to his friend and fellow novelist Nancy Mitford, her response was enthusiastic, except for wishing that his protagonist was less dim and had a little more glamour. But, of course, Waugh was making a conscious artistic decision, and Julian Barnes has made a similar choice in his brief novel, which Tuesday was awarded England's Man Booker Prize. Tony Webster, the middle-aged, middle-class, middle-of-the-road narrator of "The Sense of an Ending," has few illusions about himself or the safe path he has chosen.
BOOKS
February 11, 2001 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
What do we talk about when we talk about love? According to Mike Nichols and Elaine May, Americans talk about guilt, the French about menages a trois and the English about hats. But that was 40 years ago, when trans-Atlantic romance was for the wealthy few and our loves and our betrayals were relatively homogeneous.
BOOKS
June 13, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI
This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land, Dear for her reputation throughout the world, Is now leased out, I die pronouncing it, Like to a tenement or pelting farm -- WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, "RICHARD II" **** On one level, Julian Barnes' latest novel, "England, England," can be summed up as The History of the World in One Amusement Park.
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