Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulian Bartley
IN THE NEWS

Julian Bartley

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | MARC LACEY and AMANDA ELK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Before a bomb devastated the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, a line of Kenyans and Americans seeking aid would form outside the building every morning. Some hoped for visas. Others had been robbed. Each one faced some dilemma. It was Julian Bartley's job to make sure that not a soul was left by the end of the day. Other senior embassy staffers focused their attention on treaties, contracts or policies. As consul general, Bartley was the embassy's outreach officer for everyday expatriates and locals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | MARC LACEY and AMANDA ELK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Before a bomb devastated the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, a line of Kenyans and Americans seeking aid would form outside the building every morning. Some hoped for visas. Others had been robbed. Each one faced some dilemma. It was Julian Bartley's job to make sure that not a soul was left by the end of the day. Other senior embassy staffers focused their attention on treaties, contracts or policies. As consul general, Bartley was the embassy's outreach officer for everyday expatriates and locals.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 14, 1998
Julian Bartley, 55 Native of Jacksonville, Fla., was working toward an ambassadorship. Jay Bartley, 20 Julian's son, he had taken summer job at embassy; he hoped to follow in father's footsteps. **** Jean Dalizu, 60 Executive assistant in liaison office; lived in Kenya since 1972; she will be buried in Africa. **** Molly Hardy, 51 26-year State Department veteran, in Nairobi three years. **** Kenneth Hobson, 27 Army sergeant chose Kenya because it seemed safe for family.
NEWS
August 14, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The bodies of 10 victims of the Nairobi embassy carnage returned home Thursday, mourned and honored by a president who praised them as Americans of "adventurous spirit" and "generous soul."
NEWS
February 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
For two days this week, Edith Bartley sat in a fortified courthouse, silently sizing up the shackled men accused of killing her father and brother in terrorist bombings at two American embassies. Bartley had publicly lashed out at U.S. officials, accusing them of ignoring threats in the months before the 1998 attacks. But the four defendants themselves, she said, elicited other emotions--including bewilderment. "I caught myself staring at a couple of them and thinking, 'Why?' " Bartley said.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A phalanx of American medical, military, intelligence and diplomatic personnel descended on this capital Sunday as U.S. Ambassador Prudence Bushnell held a solemn memorial service at her suburban Nairobi residence for a dozen dead Americans. The number of Americans known to have been killed in Friday's bombing at the U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
International rescue teams continued a painstaking search for survivors beneath hunks of collapsed concrete Saturday as the death toll from terrorist bombs outside the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania rose to at least 147, with more than 4,800 injured. Thirty-six hours into the search, an Israeli-led crew salvaged Kenya's floundering rescue effort and boosted the nation's spirits when they extracted a 45-year-old businessman from beneath the debris.
NEWS
May 31, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal prosecutor urged jurors on Wednesday to impose the death penalty on a convicted terrorist who showed such "total lack of remorse" that he posed triumphantly for a photograph after participating in the bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, that killed 213 people.
NEWS
December 8, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans have opened their hearts and wallets to the victims of Sept. 11, giving more money to a single cause in a shorter time than ever before. Relief organizations have been swamped with more than $1.3 billion in gifts and pledges in the weeks since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. An astounding 70% of U.S. adults donated money, blood or time to the relief effort, according to a survey conducted for the Independent Sector, a coalition of nonprofit groups.
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury convicted four followers of Islamic militant Osama bin Laden on Tuesday in the bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa in 1998 that killed 224. The almost simultaneous attacks on the diplomatic facilities in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, the capital of Tanzania, were part of what prosecutors said was a worldwide plot to murder Americans. More than 4,500 were injured, many seriously, in the massive explosions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|