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Julian Bond

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000 | JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS
Civil rights leader Julian Bond will deliver the eighth annual Human Rights Lecture tonight at Soka University of America. Bond, chairman of the board of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, will discuss "Race and Rights in the New Millennium" as part of the university series that annually presents prominent speakers to address the struggle for peace, social justice and reform.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
What's remarkable about photojournalist Leonard Freed's book "This Is the Day: The March on Washington" (Getty: $29.95), a photo essay documenting the historic Aug. 28, 1963, civil-rights march, is that it includes only one photograph of Martin Luther King Jr. A wide-angle shot of the crowd gathered at the base of the Lincoln Memorial shows a barely discernible King at the podium giving his celebrated "I Have a Dream" speech. Freed's "focus was on seeing the event from multiple points of view, from students to clergy to the national park rangers," said Paul Farber, instructor of urban studies at the University of Pennsylvania who worked closely with the photographer's widow, Brigitte, to select 75 images from his archive of 500 black-and-white photos (Freed died in 2006)
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NEWS
January 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Former state Sen. Julian Bond must pay his ex-wife $4,200 per month in alimony for five years under the terms of their divorce. After five years, the amount drops to $3,300, Alice Bond's attorney, Louis K. Polonsky, said Tuesday. Bond, 49, filed for divorce from her in 1988, a year after she rocked Atlanta by alleging that her husband and other prominent blacks in the city used cocaine regularly. The allegations led to police and grand jury investigations, but no charges were filed.
OPINION
January 17, 2013 | By Steve Oney
During World War II, as a tank commander in Gen. George S. Patton's 3rd Army, Eugene Patterson participated in a daring maneuver that helped assure the Allied victory in the Battle of the Bulge. Asked subsequently what he was most proud of about his part in this and other engagements, Patterson often talked about how he led troops into combat not with an impersonal "Go" but with a command that signaled his intention to expose himself to the same dangers they faced: "Let's go. " Patterson, who died of cancer Saturday at 89, was a 21-year-old lieutenant when he fought under Patton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1985 | G. M.\f7 Bush
Civil rights activist and former Georgia state Sen. Julian Bond will be the featured speaker at a tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. on Friday in the Valley High School auditorium, 1801 S. Greenville St. Bond's appearance, set for 7 p.m., marks the 56th anniversary of Rev. King's birth on Jan. 15, 1929. The two first met when Bond took a philosophy course under King at Atlanta's Morehouse College in the late 1950s.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Atty. Richard L. Barr Jr. said Monday that his office has begun looking into allegations that former Georgia state Sen. Julian Bond and other prominent Atlantans have been involved in cocaine abuse. Barr said that his office had received information concerning the allegations and "other related activities," and is reviewing them for any violation of federal drug laws.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writer
It was the final day of the tumultuous 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, and destiny was calling Julian Bond, a 28-year-old Georgia state legislator and civil rights activist. His successful challenge to the Georgia delegation headed by segregationist Gov. Lester G. Maddox had marked him as an up-and-comer earlier in the convention. Further interest had followed his stirring speech seconding the nomination of peace candidate Sen. Eugene McCarthy for the presidential race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Julia Agnes Washington Bond, 99, whose son Julian became chairman of the NAACP and co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center, died Friday in Atlanta, according to the Carl M. Williams Funeral Home. A cause of death was not given. Julia Bond was born in Nashville and graduated from Pearl High School -- the city's only black high school -- in 1924 at age 16. She graduated from Fisk University in Nashville with a bachelor's degree in English in 1929, according to the funeral home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1985 | G.M. BUSH, Time Staff Writer
Georgia state Sen. Julian Bond, in Orange County Friday night to speak at an observance of the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., used the occasion to look back at the civil rights movement led by the slain civil rights leader and to chastise the Reagan Administration's "constituency of the comfortable, the callous and the smug."
OPINION
June 14, 1998 | Kay Mills, Kay Mills is author of "Something Better for My Children: The History and People of Head Start." She interviewed Julian Bond at his American University office
Scandals big and small have besieged the venerable National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People--established in 1909 under the leadership of scholar-activist W.E.B. DuBois--in the last few years. First, Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., was fired as executive director for using NAACP funds to help settle a sex discrimination and sexual harassment suit against himself. The next year, board chairman William F. Gibson was ousted because he used NAACP money for personal purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Julia Agnes Washington Bond, 99, whose son Julian became chairman of the NAACP and co-founded the Southern Poverty Law Center, died Friday in Atlanta, according to the Carl M. Williams Funeral Home. A cause of death was not given. Julia Bond was born in Nashville and graduated from Pearl High School -- the city's only black high school -- in 1924 at age 16. She graduated from Fisk University in Nashville with a bachelor's degree in English in 1929, according to the funeral home.
OPINION
October 4, 2002
Re "Sorry, I'm Just Not Myself Today," Opinion, Sept. 29: Julian Bond is not alone in the mistaken-identity department. I am absolutely certain that the media have been confusing Barry Manilow and Joe Montana for years. Susan Lindley Claremont
OPINION
September 29, 2002 | JULIAN BOND, Julian Bond is a distinguished professor at American University and a history professor at the University of Virginia. He is board chairman of the NAACP.
I'm not Andrew Young. I'm not Roger Wilkins either. But I'm often mistaken for both. There are worse things than to be mistaken for these two highly accomplished achievers. Young is a former ambassador to the United Nations and the former mayor of Atlanta. He was a close confidant of Martin Luther King Jr. Today, he owns an international consulting firm.
NEWS
July 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The chairman of the NAACP accused President Bush of choosing nominees from the "Taliban wing of American politics" whose devotion to the Confederacy is "nearly canine." Julian Bond told the group's convention in New Orleans Sunday: "Bush selected nominees from the Taliban wing of American politics, appeased the wretched appetites of the extreme right wing, and chose Cabinet officials whose devotion to the Confederacy is nearly canine in its uncritical affection."
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
NAACP board chairman Julian Bond assailed the civil rights records of Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton and Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, and denounced President Bush's faith-based initiative, at the group's 92nd annual convention. Bush has asserted that church-based groups receiving government funds should be able to refuse employment to people outside their religion. But critics, including Bond, contend that this could amount to government-funded discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2000 | JOHNATHON E. BRIGGS
Civil rights leader Julian Bond will deliver the eighth annual Human Rights Lecture tonight at Soka University of America. Bond, chairman of the board of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, will discuss "Race and Rights in the New Millennium" as part of the university series that annually presents prominent speakers to address the struggle for peace, social justice and reform.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Civil rights pioneer Julian Bond on Saturday was named chairman of the NAACP, which has weathered scandals and financial difficulties in recent years. "It is a daunting responsibility," Bond told members who met at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Manhattan after the 29-24 vote. "I want to make sure the NAACP voice is heard wherever race is discussed."
NEWS
February 1, 1986 | Associated Press
State Sen. Julian Bond, 46, announced Friday that he will seek the Democratic nomination for the House seat held by Wyche Fowler Jr.
NEWS
February 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that racism is alive and well in America, NAACP Chairman Julian Bond on Saturday accused the Republican leaders of Congress of being hostile to civil rights. Despite advances since the end of segregation, racism is everywhere--especially in politics--the veteran activist said at the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People's 90th annual meeting.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | From Associated Press
The NAACP's national board chairman has an unlikely role model in his effort to reinvigorate the civil rights organization: the Christian Coalition. "The coalition has a committed cadre of activists, as we do, but the organization and mobilization is more effective," said Julian Bond, who launched his first NAACP annual convention Saturday as chairman of the powerful 64-member national board. The meeting brings thousands of National Assn.
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