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Julian Burke

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Julian Burke, a corporate turnaround expert who brought a steady hand and political savvy to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority when it was teetering financially and facing federal scrutiny for poor bus service across Los Angeles County, died Saturday at his West Hollywood home. He was 85. His death was confirmed by Allan Lipsky, who had worked with him as the MTA's chief operating officer. He had been ill for some time. Burke was recruited to serve as the agency's interim chief executive in 1997 by then-mayor of Los Angeles and MTA Chairman Richard Riordan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Julian Burke, a corporate turnaround expert who brought a steady hand and political savvy to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority when it was teetering financially and facing federal scrutiny for poor bus service across Los Angeles County, died Saturday at his West Hollywood home. He was 85. His death was confirmed by Allan Lipsky, who had worked with him as the MTA's chief operating officer. He had been ill for some time. Burke was recruited to serve as the agency's interim chief executive in 1997 by then-mayor of Los Angeles and MTA Chairman Richard Riordan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1997 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first major remarks since taking over as chief executive officer of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Julian Burke sought Wednesday to reassure the troubled transit agency's employees that they do not work for the most troubled organization he has confronted in a long career as a corporate turnaround specialist. "I have seen organizations that were at least in as much difficulty and strain, if not more so," Burke said, assessing the challenge that lies before him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Snoble, the top executive of the Dallas transit agency, Wednesday was named the new head of Los Angeles County's Metropolitan Transportation Authority and given a salary of $295,000 a year. By all accounts, Snoble, who has run the Dallas Area Rapid Transit since 1994, was the top choice of the MTA governing board from the moment he showed an interest in the job. The biggest question seemed to be whether the 56-year-old executive could agree with the board on pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acknowledging the crisis facing the nation's second-largest bus system, Metropolitan Transportation Authority chief Julian Burke called Wednesday for the accelerated purchase of new buses to replace the agency's old and crippled bus fleet. Moving to prevent a federal court from ordering specific improvements to the bus system, Burke urged the MTA board to approve buying 2,095 new buses over the next six years, nearly 800 more than the agency had planned to purchase.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Board of Directors postponed a decision Thursday on whether to appoint Julian Burke permanent chief executive officer after the acting CEO urged them to consider the issue in a more deliberative way. Burke, the corporate turnaround expert who has run the troubled transit agency since summer, said he wanted the board to have "a reasonable opportunity" to discuss its expectations of him before he becomes the permanent CEO.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | JEFFREY RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julian Burke, the 73-year-old chief executive officer of the troubled Metropolitan Transportation Authority, announced Monday that he will leave the agency within a few months. Burke said he will step down as soon as a successor is found. He said he will continue to serve the agency as an advisor, if requested. "I'm committed to this agency," he said. "I will work to ensure a smooth transition. I'll work hard until I turn in the keys."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to bring some stability to the troubled Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the agency's Executive Management Committee agreed Thursday to recommend that acting CEO Julian Burke be offered a two-year contract to serve as the MTA's permanent chief executive officer.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crisis-ridden Metropolitan Transportation Authority board did the obvious thing Friday and turned to a "crisis management" specialist, Julian Burke, to restore order while the agency searches for a permanent transit chief. Burke is an old friend and former legal colleague of Mayor Richard Riordan, the MTA board's chairman, and has worked on turnarounds of the troubled Penn Central Railroad and the Teamsters pension fund. He was hired to serve up to a year as interim chief executive officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998
As a long-time observer of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, nothing truly surprises me in the tale of woe told in "MTA Borrowing Puts the Agency $7 Billion in Debt" (June 21). But nonetheless it depresses me deeply. For far too long our state legislators have twiddled their thumbs while the agency they created, MTA, has spun downward toward disaster. I believe what is called for now is radical action: Jettison the present board (a collection of elected officials who know little about transportation and seem uninterested to learn)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | JEFFREY RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julian Burke, the 73-year-old chief executive officer of the troubled Metropolitan Transportation Authority, announced Monday that he will leave the agency within a few months. Burke said he will step down as soon as a successor is found. He said he will continue to serve the agency as an advisor, if requested. "I'm committed to this agency," he said. "I will work to ensure a smooth transition. I'll work hard until I turn in the keys."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like MTA bus riders on the street and drivers on the picket lines, these are tough times for Julian Burke. The 73-year-old corporate turnaround specialist helped to clean up the Teamsters' corrupt Central States Pension Fund, sold off assets of the bankrupt Penn Central Railroad, revived two major insurance companies, and managed assets of failed savings and loans for the federal government's Resolution Trust Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A divided California Transportation Commission voted Thursday to approve $83.2 million for construction of a light-rail line between downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena despite the inability of MTA chief executive Julian Burke to offer assurances sought by the panel. Specifically, Burke could not guarantee that the troubled transit agency will have money to run the trains once the long-delayed rail project is built.
OPINION
August 15, 1999 | RON WHITE, Ron White is an editorial writer for The Times
Julian Burke was tapped as the interim CEO of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority at a time when the agency was hard-pressed to find a suitable candidate who wanted the permanent post. All the better for Burke, a corporate "crisis management" specialist who could clean house and then move on, leaving a smooth path for a permanent CEO. When Mayor Richard Riordan suggested Burke in 1997, the MTA was in shambles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1998 | AMY PYLE and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After hearing Metropolitan Transportation Authority chief Julian Burke declare that his agency has changed course, a key California Transportation Commission panel voted Tuesday to allow the MTA to use $90 million in state funds to buy new buses instead of reserving it for subway lines to the Eastside and Mid-City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a sharp break with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's long absorption in rail transit, the agency's chief executive, Julian Burke, called Thursday for a radically new course, including a "gold standard" of faster bus service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A divided California Transportation Commission voted Thursday to approve $83.2 million for construction of a light-rail line between downtown Los Angeles and Pasadena despite the inability of MTA chief executive Julian Burke to offer assurances sought by the panel. Specifically, Burke could not guarantee that the troubled transit agency will have money to run the trains once the long-delayed rail project is built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Moving to counter efforts to derail a subway extension to the Eastside, Los Angeles County Supervisor and Metropolitan Transportation Authority board member Gloria Molina has unleashed a scathing written attack on acting MTA chief Julian Burke, accusing him of manipulative management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure to reduce chronic overcrowding and speed replacement of its trouble-ridden buses before a federal court steps in, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority board Monday approved in concept a plan to buy 2,095 new buses over the next six years. In the face of intense opposition from organized bus riders and clean-air advocates, MTA chief executive Julian Burke also withdrew his controversial proposal that half of the transit agency's desperately needed new buses be diesel-powered.
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