Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulian C Cummings
IN THE NEWS

Julian C Cummings

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Julian C. Cummings was 2 years old, doctors thought he was mentally retarded because he had poor balance and trouble with motor skills. "Obviously, they were wrong," an elated Cummings said Tuesday at UC Berkeley, where he had just learned that he had won the University Medal, the school's highest honor for the graduating class of 5,750. The 22-year-old senior from Huntington Beach, who is described as "spirited and articulate" and "energetic" by university officials, is graduating with a 3.966 grade point average with majors in physics and astronomy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Julian C. Cummings was 2 years old, doctors thought he was mentally retarded because he had poor balance and trouble with motor skills. "Obviously, they were wrong," an elated Cummings said Tuesday at UC Berkeley, where he had just learned that he had won the University Medal, the school's highest honor for the graduating class of 5,750. The 22-year-old senior from Huntington Beach, who is described as "spirited and articulate" and "energetic" by university officials, is graduating with a 3.966 grade point average with majors in physics and astronomy.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
When Julian C. Cummings was 2 years old, doctors thought he was mentally retarded because he had poor balance and trouble with motor skills. "Obviously, they were wrong," an elated Cummings said Tuesday at UC Berkeley, where he just learned he had won the University Medal, the school's highest honor for graduating seniors. The 22-year-old senior from Huntington Beach, who is described as "spirited and articulate" and "energetic" by university officials, is graduating with a 3.966 grade average with majors in physics and astronomy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1985 | ROXANA KOPETMAN \f7
Seventeen Orange County high school students were named Monday as winners of $2,000 scholarships and the title of National Merit Scholar in the nationwide program. The winners joined 12 other Orange County students named earlier this month to receive between $2,000 and $8,000 each from the National Merit Scholarship Corp. Nationally, 3,250 students have been chosen so far this year to receive the corporate-sponsored scholarships for undergraduate study at colleges of their choice.
OPINION
January 25, 2012
A need for speed? Re "LAPD targets costly crashes," Jan. 23 I live in Boyle Heights, around the corner from the NASCAR wannabes at the Los Angeles Police Department's Hollenbeck station. On any given day, several squad cars shoot up or down the street, often without lights or sirens. I have spoken with the watch commander on two occasions, but apparently every 911 call is truly a life-or-death situation worth risking the lives of bicyclists or motorists turning from side streets, unaware that the Millennium Falcon is bearing down on them at warp speed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|