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Julian Castro

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NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The patchwork quilt that is the Democratic Party base -- women, Latinos, African-Americans -- will be on full display at Tuesday night's opening session of the national party convention. The highlight will be a prime-time address by First Lady Michelle Obama who is expected to play the same role Ann Romney did one week ago at the GOP gathering in Tampa: eschewing hard-edged politics for a soft-focus testimonial to her husband. The keynote speech will be delivered by San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, marking the first time a Latino has delivered the marquee speech that has sometimes served as a political launching pad to bigger and better things.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
The day after Barack Obama won a second term, Jacket Copy mused on the possibility of postelection books , predicting that Julian Castro, the telegenic Texas politico with the Texas-sized grin, would soon write a memoir detailing the up-from-the-bootstraps story of his San Antonio family. Now, just eight days after the election, Castro, the mayor of San Antonio, has in fact inked a book deal -- with Little, Brown. The book will, according to the publisher, include the story of Castro's mother, Maria, a founder of La Raza Unida Party.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
The day after Barack Obama won a second term, Jacket Copy mused on the possibility of postelection books , predicting that Julian Castro, the telegenic Texas politico with the Texas-sized grin, would soon write a memoir detailing the up-from-the-bootstraps story of his San Antonio family. Now, just eight days after the election, Castro, the mayor of San Antonio, has in fact inked a book deal -- with Little, Brown. The book will, according to the publisher, include the story of Castro's mother, Maria, a founder of La Raza Unida Party.
NEWS
October 6, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Spurred on by the Democratic National Convention, new donate-by-text capability and an expanding lead in state and national polls, President Obama raised $181 million for his reelection effort in September, his campaign announced Saturday. The immense haul pushes the total raised for the incumbent's campaign this cycle to $947 million, making it a near certainty he'll surpass $1 billion raised for his campaign, the Democratic National Committee and other affiliated campaigns.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | Alana Semuels
It may have had fewer memorable turns of phrase than Barack Obama's speech to the 2004 Democratic National Convention, when the little-known state senator from Illinois spoke of "the hope of a skinny kid with a funny name who believes that America has a place for him too. " But the speech by Julian Castro, the mayor of San Antonio and the first Latino to give a keynote address at a Democratic National Convention, was just as much in the spotlight Tuesday...
NEWS
October 6, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Spurred on by the Democratic National Convention, new donate-by-text capability and an expanding lead in state and national polls, President Obama raised $181 million for his reelection effort in September, his campaign announced Saturday. The immense haul pushes the total raised for the incumbent's campaign this cycle to $947 million, making it a near certainty he'll surpass $1 billion raised for his campaign, the Democratic National Committee and other affiliated campaigns.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- In Marco Rubio and Julian Castro, both parties tapped emerging Latino leaders to deliver a message based on the idea that the American dream can be realized. But in expanding on that premise, each moved to the underlying philosophical differences between the respective parties' presidential candidates, about just how much of a role government plays in making that possible. In Tampa, Fla., last week, Rubio roused Republicans as the senator from Florida linked Mitt Romney's story to his own, saying their lives were testimony to the idea that America is a truly exceptional nation.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CHARLOTTE, N.C.  - Democrats opened their national convention Tuesday with a series of broadsides against Republican nominee Mitt Romney and a checklist of promises delivered, they say, by President Obama in spite of the worst economy in more than half a century. While saying more work must be done, one speaker after another touted the progress under the Democratic incumbent and contrasted it with the tried-and-failed policies they forecast under a Romney administration. “Republicans tell us that if the most prosperous among us do even better, that somehow the rest of us will, too,” Julian Castro, the night's keynote speaker, said in remarks prepared for delivery to thousands of delegates inside the Charlotte arena.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - They were both young, relatively unknown politicians from a key demographic chosen to give a keynote speech at one of the nation's biggest stages - the Democratic National Convention - and expected to wow the crowd. But the similarities between then-Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama , who gave the keynote address at the DNC in 2004, and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, Tuesday night's keynote speaker, end there. Castro, 37, is by all accounts a relatively shy and humble mayor devoted to his young family and tight with his twin brother, a congressional candidate who will introduce him at the convention.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
SAN ANTONIO - The Mexican businessmen in Rolexes and Burberry ties meet on the north side of town, at Cielito Lindo Restaurant, or at new neighboring country clubs. Their wives frequent Neiman Marcus, Tiffany's and Brooks Brothers at the nearby mall. Their children park Porsches with Mexican license plates in the student lots at Reagan High School. They are part of a wave of legal Mexican immigrants who have been overlooked in the national debate over how to deal with their largely impoverished illegal compatriots.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2012 | Alana Semuels
It may have had fewer memorable turns of phrase than Barack Obama's speech to the 2004 Democratic National Convention, when the little-known state senator from Illinois spoke of "the hope of a skinny kid with a funny name who believes that America has a place for him too. " But the speech by Julian Castro, the mayor of San Antonio and the first Latino to give a keynote address at a Democratic National Convention, was just as much in the spotlight Tuesday...
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- In Marco Rubio and Julian Castro, both parties tapped emerging Latino leaders to deliver a message based on the idea that the American dream can be realized. But in expanding on that premise, each moved to the underlying philosophical differences between the respective parties' presidential candidates, about just how much of a role government plays in making that possible. In Tampa, Fla., last week, Rubio roused Republicans as the senator from Florida linked Mitt Romney's story to his own, saying their lives were testimony to the idea that America is a truly exceptional nation.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CHARLOTTE, N.C.  - Democrats opened their national convention Tuesday with a series of broadsides against Republican nominee Mitt Romney and a checklist of promises delivered, they say, by President Obama in spite of the worst economy in more than half a century. While saying more work must be done, one speaker after another touted the progress under the Democratic incumbent and contrasted it with the tried-and-failed policies they forecast under a Romney administration. “Republicans tell us that if the most prosperous among us do even better, that somehow the rest of us will, too,” Julian Castro, the night's keynote speaker, said in remarks prepared for delivery to thousands of delegates inside the Charlotte arena.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Alana Semuels, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - They were both young, relatively unknown politicians from a key demographic chosen to give a keynote speech at one of the nation's biggest stages - the Democratic National Convention - and expected to wow the crowd. But the similarities between then-Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama , who gave the keynote address at the DNC in 2004, and San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, Tuesday night's keynote speaker, end there. Castro, 37, is by all accounts a relatively shy and humble mayor devoted to his young family and tight with his twin brother, a congressional candidate who will introduce him at the convention.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- The patchwork quilt that is the Democratic Party base -- women, Latinos, African-Americans -- will be on full display at Tuesday night's opening session of the national party convention. The highlight will be a prime-time address by First Lady Michelle Obama who is expected to play the same role Ann Romney did one week ago at the GOP gathering in Tampa: eschewing hard-edged politics for a soft-focus testimonial to her husband. The keynote speech will be delivered by San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, marking the first time a Latino has delivered the marquee speech that has sometimes served as a political launching pad to bigger and better things.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Katherine Skiba, Chicago Tribune
WASHINGTON - First Lady Michelle Obama will address the opening night of the Democratic National Convention on Sept. 4, the Obama campaign and convention organizers announced Tuesday. San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro - like the first lady and the president, a graduate of Harvard Law - will deliver the keynote speech that evening, organizers said. Castro will be the first Latino tapped for a keynote speech at a Democratic National Convention, they said. The convention, held in Charlotte, N.C., will run through Sept.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
Democrats might have selected the keynote speaker at their convention to rally Latino voters, but the pick also illuminated the fact that as far as young Latino politicians go, the party doesn't have a very deep bench. The Democratic National Convention Committee selected San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, 37 -- whose twin brother, Joaquin, will almost certainly be elected to Congress from Texas in November -- as its keynote speaker in Charlotte, N.C. Though San Antonio has a population of 1.3 million, Castro is still a local officeholder.
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