Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulian Crouch
IN THE NEWS

Julian Crouch

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2012 | By Barbara Isenberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Few properties have been mined as often as the world of Gomez and Morticia Addams, their children Wednesday and Pugsley, strange Uncle Fester and the rest of the macabre clan. Introduced in 1938 through Charles Addams' cartoons in the New Yorker, the ghoulish Addams family went on to star in a sitcom, movies and animated TV before inhabiting a Broadway musical in April 2010. Written by "Jersey Boys" librettists Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, with a score by "The Wild Party's" Andrew Lippa, "The Addams Family" musical arrived on Broadway with Nathan Lane, Bebe Neuwirth, a $14-million advance and a critical thud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's hard to imagine a more peculiar mix of canny and canned than “The Addams Family,” which opened Tuesday at the Pantages Theatre. Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Andrew Lippa's 2010 musical adaptation of Charles Addams' celebrated New Yorker cartoon clan stitches together shrewdly maneuvered, innately mismatched elements, and still causes audiences to lose their collective heads. This had already been the case throughout “Family's” trek from Chicago to Broadway, where original director-designers Phelim McDermott and Julian Crouch of “Shockheaded Peter” fame had given way to director Jerry Zaks.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2012 | By Barbara Isenberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Few properties have been mined as often as the world of Gomez and Morticia Addams, their children Wednesday and Pugsley, strange Uncle Fester and the rest of the macabre clan. Introduced in 1938 through Charles Addams' cartoons in the New Yorker, the ghoulish Addams family went on to star in a sitcom, movies and animated TV before inhabiting a Broadway musical in April 2010. Written by "Jersey Boys" librettists Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, with a score by "The Wild Party's" Andrew Lippa, "The Addams Family" musical arrived on Broadway with Nathan Lane, Bebe Neuwirth, a $14-million advance and a critical thud.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
They were popular cartoons in the New Yorker. And they found success on the big and small screens. Now a musical version of "The Addams Family," based on cartoonist Charles Addams' creepy characters, is planned for Broadway, aiming to arrive during the 2009-10 season, producer Stuart Oken said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
An exquisite creep-out, filled with stories that end with disobedient children bleeding or burning to death, the London export "Shockheaded Peter" acts as its own carny barker. Come one, come all. Enter our tawdry Victorian fairground of cautionary tales. Now disorienting audiences nightly at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, "Shockheaded Peter" is subtitled a "junk opera." It premiered in London three years ago and then became a notorious hit.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By David Ng
Classical music fans in Southern California have known for several years that Andreas Mitisek works minor miracles on a shoestring at Long Beach Opera. With limited financial resources, he has maintained the small company's reputation as a risk-taker, embracing experimental and unconventional works that major opera houses tend to ignore. Mitisek is among the 25 people  named this month by Opera News as part of its  "Next Wave" cover story. The venerated monthly, published by New York's Metropolitan Opera Guild, chose 25 individuals the editors believe "are poised to break out and become major forces in the field in the coming decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The British company Improbable Theatre, whose "Spirit" is at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, drew glowing reviews for "70 Hill Lane" and "Lifegame" at La Jolla Playhouse. Key members of the Improbable team also won a lot of fans with "Shockheaded Peter" last year at the Freud. Lower those expectations. The innovative staging of "Spirit" keeps an audience watching with interest, but the content is sketchy and platitudinous at best, inchoate at worst.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2000 | DON BRAUNAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First, a critic's caveat: If you go to "Lifegame," you won't see what's described in this review. That aside, what you will see, you'll probably enjoy. "Lifegame," conceived by Keith Johnstone, is an ingenious twist on the improvisational theater "call out a subject" challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"70 Hill Lane," an unexpectedly magical show from the 2-year-old British troupe Improbable Theatre, begins with a man fashioning a puppet out of some crumpled-up newspaper. At first, it's difficult to believe in something as absurdly crude as a newspaper puppet. But in just a little while, this sheet of ink-stained paper becomes not only a viable figurine but a beloved grandmother, hooked up to an IV, taking her final few precious breaths in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
An architect tries to commit suicide in the half-finished cathedral he designed, but his attempt fails. He is left hanging from the gallows, alive as ever, apparently not even wounded. This is the central image of Improbable Theatre's "The Hanging Man" at Freud Playhouse, part of UCLA Live's International Theatre Festival. Always intriguing and sometimes amusing, it's a production that feels almost as unfinished as its protagonist's suicide attempt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
NEW YORK -- The production of Philip Glass’ "Satyagraha" that opened Friday night, the first at the Metropolitan Opera, is more than opera. This epic new vision of a Minimalist masterpiece revolving around the events in South Africa that inspired Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolence is also more opera than I have ever witnessed at the Met or learned about in the annals of the storied company.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|