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Julian Eltinge

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
He was a 200-pound man who squeezed himself into a corset with a 23-inch waist and size 4 high-heeled shoes. His outrageous behavior earned him more money than the president of the United States, and a theater was named in honor of what many saw as his illegitimate, even shocking, stage conduct. Julian Eltinge, the original King of Drag, pioneered modern female impersonation, becoming the world's most ravishingly flamboyant illusionist on stage and screen from before World War I into the 1930s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
He was a 200-pound man who squeezed himself into a corset with a 23-inch waist and size 4 high-heeled shoes. His outrageous behavior earned him more money than the president of the United States, and a theater was named in honor of what many saw as his illegitimate, even shocking, stage conduct. Julian Eltinge, the original King of Drag, pioneered modern female impersonation, becoming the world's most ravishingly flamboyant illusionist on stage and screen from before World War I into the 1930s.
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BOOKS
August 30, 1987 | Vincent Curcio
THEATRICAL ANECDOTES by Peter Hay (Oxford University: $17.95; 384 pp.). For people in the profession, the theatrical anecdote has always been more than the source of wit, style and sentiment it is for most people. For us it is also instruction, the repository of the oral traditions by which we shape our craft and inspire what art we possess.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1987 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The miracle of television is that it not only makes history, as in the hearings, it recirculates history indefinitely. Sit long enough and you can study the whole life of the movies and win a doctorate in Trivial Pursuit. The other day, playing channel roulette when all the other demands of the world took more energy than I had, I came upon "Victor/Victoria" and Julie Andrews pretending to be a man.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010 | Hector Tobar
This week I saw a work of art at the Huntington Library that set me off on a journey — in search of a ghost from L.A.'s past. It was a 1932 print by Paul Landacre, an L.A. resident considered by many the master American wood engraver of his day. Landacre etched two large trees looming over a curving road and an empty stone staircase. It's a landscape with the feel of a country retreat, even though it's really a hillside lot in what is now Echo Park. Landacre and his wife, Margaret, lived there for nearly 40 years, until their deaths in 1963, according to the gallery display.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before there was Hollywood, there was Edendale. Today, few visitors or residents who navigate the eastern part of Silver Lake are aware that they are traversing the crossroads of cinematic history. When producer William Selig opened his mission-style studio at Clifford Street and Glendale Boulevard in 1910, he not only ushered in future stars and eager fans, but also opened the gates to what would become the film capital of the world.
BOOKS
January 21, 2007 | Jenny Burman, Jenny Burman writes "Chicken Corner," a blog on Echo Park for LAObserved.
THE best stories always seem to come at us sideways, while we are looking for something else. Thus, Daniel Hurewitz writes in his introduction to "Bohemian Los Angeles and the Making of Modern Politics," "I did not set out to find Julian Eltinge. Instead, I stumbled across him while on a search for another man.... Harry Hay." In the early 1950s, Hay was a founder of the Mattachine Society, the first significant gay-rights organization in the United States.
TRAVEL
December 20, 2013 | By Kelly Merritt
NEW YORK - I'm standing on the stage of the Hudson Theatre. I'm 23 again, when I dreamed of stardom on the Great White Way. Though I hadn't the stomach to wait for fame and fortune and traded singing for paper and pen, I often return to indulge my love of New York City theaters. This year, on a trip to the city, I discovered that my favorite old theaters have become vibrant attractions all on their own, replete with tours and fans. Little did I know the Hudson Theatre (145 W. 44th St.)
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