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Julian Lennon

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
"THE SECRET VALUE OF DAYDREAMING." Julian Lennon. Atlantic. Frank Sinatra Jr. has made a nice living out of being an ersatz version of his father, and in a brief time Julian Lennon has had even greater success in a similar role. With this second album, John's offspring continues to take the slickest and most colorless facets of his father's latter-day sound and combine it with even smoother and blander aspects of contemporary commercial pop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010
When a Hollywood studio remakes "The Wizard of Oz," L. Frank Baum doesn't have a chance to send out a press release. But the tricky thing about rebooting a property that's only been gone seven years is that the creator is usually around to say something about it. That's just what Joss Whedon did after Monday's news that a young writer named Whit Anderson, who grew up watching "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," would now tackle the new movie. It was largely a jokey missive that Whedon sent to E!
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT
Julian Lennon closed his eyes and went straight to heaven. The young singer-songwriter's blissful smile indicated that a vision of paradise was being screened in his mind's eye. It turned out that his heaven wasn't exotic or luxurious. He was just dreaming about enjoying a few weeks off, with no recording studios, no concert halls, no record executives, no nosy interviewers--just leisure. "Sheer, pure heaven," gushed Lennon, the 23-year-old son of John, the late Beatle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2009 | Associated Press
Lucy Vodden, who provided the inspiration for the Beatles' classic song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," has died after a long battle with lupus. She was 46. Her death was announced Monday by St. Thomas' Hospital in London, where she had been treated for the chronic disease for more than five years, and by her husband, Ross Vodden. Britain's Press Association said she died Sept. 22. Hospital officials said they could not confirm the day of her death. Vodden's connection to the Beatles dates to her early days, when she made friends with schoolmate Julian Lennon, John Lennon's son. Julian Lennon, then 4 years old, came home from school with a drawing one day, showed it to his father, and said it was "Lucy in the sky with diamonds."
REAL ESTATE
December 18, 1988 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Julian Lennon has purchased a mountaintop estate in the Santa Monica Mountains, which was used as the site of a World War II bunker. The pop musician, son of John Lennon, closed escrow Friday on the acre-size property with 360-degree city/valley views and a private, gated road. Richard Somers, who sold the site, said the purchase price was between $1 million and $2 million. "I had it on the market, took it off, then put it back on, and it sold in a day," Somers said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | ELYSA GARDNER
Being the son of a rock legend initially proved a double-edged sword for Julian Lennon. After releasing an impressive first album, 1984's "Valotte," the singer seemed thwarted by the intense pressure and scrutiny imposed by his famous surname, and he lost creative focus. But that was then. Now 35, Lennon has returned from a seven-year recording hiatus with an album that fulfills the promise of "Valotte" and reflects his increasing comfort with his irrevocable connection to pop history.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1986 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"The way things are going, they're gonna crucify me," somebody famous once sang, and Julian Lennon must feel that way sometimes. Neither his second album nor second tour--which touched down Tuesday at the Universal Amphitheatre--are selling nearly the way their predecessors did, which lends credence to the many naysayers who see the junior Lennon's vapid pop as being a disgrace to his legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1985 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
"I wasn't acting, I was just plain scared," Julian Lennon insisted, recalling his reaction to his first concert. "The fear is still there in all the shows, but you get more confident and go ahead in spite of it." The young singer/songwriter--son of the late John Lennon--has a permanent record of his jitters early in his first tour. The whole experience is captured on a 58-minute videocassette, "Stand by Me: A Portrait of Julian Lennon" (MCA, $29.95), a mixture of concert and interview footage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1985
The most astonishing thing in Calendar Dec. 23 was a letter from a Dave Grumman who said that Julian Lennon is more talented than John ever was. Grumman has to be the dumbest human being on the face of this earth. And Calendar comes in second for publishing such stupidity. ALLEN WILLIAMS Las Vegas
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Julian Lennon sold a share of his financial stake in Beatles songs co-written by his late father to a New York music publishing firm in a deal announced Friday that will help with his next music project. Financial terms were not disclosed, but Primary Wave Music Publishing said its acquisition represented a significant share of Julian Lennon's economic interest in the songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2009 | Associated Press
They were childhood chums. Then they drifted apart, lost touch completely, and only renewed their friendship decades later, when illness struck. Not so unusual, really. Except she is Lucy Vodden -- the girl who was the inspiration for the Beatles' 1967 classic "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" -- and he is Julian Lennon, the musician son of John Lennon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Julian Lennon sold a share of his financial stake in Beatles songs co-written by his late father to a New York music publishing firm in a deal announced Friday that will help with his next music project. Financial terms were not disclosed, but Primary Wave Music Publishing said its acquisition represented a significant share of Julian Lennon's economic interest in the songs.
NEWS
March 6, 2003 | Samantha Bonar, Times Staff Writer
Because I've been a freelance book reviewer for an online company for the last 10 years, I got an invitation to a book debut party at Chateau Marmont that promised to be celebrity-studded. I love parties, especially ones that promise free hors d'oeuvres and booze. Also, this one was being promoted by a cosmetics company, so I figured there was a good chance there'd be gift bags. But to call me a wallflower would be kind. I'm more of a sink-into-the-floor flower.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Pop quiz: What should not be played through the sound system before a Julian Lennon concert? Yup. The House of Blues' computerized music library played not just one Beatles song on Wednesday, but both "She Loves You" and "Love Me Do," each eliciting cheers from the Beatlemanian audience--a reminder that no matter what John Lennon's older son does in music, he'll never escape this shadow. So be it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | ELYSA GARDNER
Being the son of a rock legend initially proved a double-edged sword for Julian Lennon. After releasing an impressive first album, 1984's "Valotte," the singer seemed thwarted by the intense pressure and scrutiny imposed by his famous surname, and he lost creative focus. But that was then. Now 35, Lennon has returned from a seven-year recording hiatus with an album that fulfills the promise of "Valotte" and reflects his increasing comfort with his irrevocable connection to pop history.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Conversation overheard in the men's room at the Wiltern Theatre on Monday, near the end of Julian Lennon's concert: Mr. A: "That's it. I'm outta here!" Mr. B: "Is he just playing the same song over and over?" Mr. A: "And where're the Beatles songs? He's supposed to play some Beatles. That's what I came for." Poor Jude! The harder he tries to escape the ghost of his father John, the more tenaciously some people hold on to the mythic connection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2009 | Associated Press
Lucy Vodden, who provided the inspiration for the Beatles' classic song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," has died after a long battle with lupus. She was 46. Her death was announced Monday by St. Thomas' Hospital in London, where she had been treated for the chronic disease for more than five years, and by her husband, Ross Vodden. Britain's Press Association said she died Sept. 22. Hospital officials said they could not confirm the day of her death. Vodden's connection to the Beatles dates to her early days, when she made friends with schoolmate Julian Lennon, John Lennon's son. Julian Lennon, then 4 years old, came home from school with a drawing one day, showed it to his father, and said it was "Lucy in the sky with diamonds."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Singer-songwriter Julian Lennon says that he's learned to separate himself from the legend of his late Beatle father, John Lennon, and wishes other people would too. "I've only basically come to terms with it in the last two or three years after throwing myself into this industry," said Lennon, 26, who is touring to promote his third album, "Mr. Jordan." "People would ask, 'How do you feel about this shadow. . . .' Basically, what people were saying is I'm not good enough to take Dad's place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Singer-songwriter Julian Lennon says that he's learned to separate himself from the legend of his late Beatle father, John Lennon, and wishes other people would too. "I've only basically come to terms with it in the last two or three years after throwing myself into this industry," said Lennon, 26, who is touring to promote his third album, "Mr. Jordan." "People would ask, 'How do you feel about this shadow. . . .' Basically, what people were saying is I'm not good enough to take Dad's place.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
Sometimes he sounds like his dad, which is natural enough. Sometimes he affects the deep-voiced theatricality of the post-punk legion ofDavid Bowie imitators. But, most of all, Julian Lennon sounds here as if he hasn't an original thought in his head, nor any expressive means that transcend cliche. Producer Patrick Leonard tries to keep it interesting with a host of studio tricks and a small army of supporting players, but all that isn't worth much if the key songwriter doesn't dare to imagine.
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