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Julian Nava

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NEWS
November 5, 1992
Julian Nava, a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico and the first Latino to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Education, is running for mayor of Los Angeles on a platform that will focus on fighting crime and rebuilding the city's job base. Nava, 65, has been involved in civic life for a quarter of a century. A Democrat, he has been associated with both liberal and conservative causes--as an advocate of school busing in the 1970s and as a supporter of former Police Chief Daryl F. Gates.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI
Julian Nava, Cal State Northridge history professor and former U.S. ambassador to Mexico in the Carter administration, will donate his papers to the university's Oviatt Library on Friday, ending a three-day symposium on U.S.-Mexico relations. The papers include personal notes, newspaper clippings, photos and letters from former President Jimmy Carter during Nava's term as ambassador from 1979-1981. "He came at a really great time," said Robert Marshall, a CSUN archivist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civil rights attorney Gloria Allred and former U. S. ambassador to Mexico Julian Nava were selected Monday to head a citizens committee that will recommend reforms in the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. The pair were elected co-chairs by others on the 21-member panel, which was appointed by Sheriff Sherman Block two weeks ago in the wake of the Christopher Commission study of brutality in the Los Angeles Police Department and four controversial shootings of suspects by deputies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1996
Re "Video by CSUN's Nava Questions U.S. Cuba Policy," Nov. 25. Julian Nava is certainly on the right track with the development of his video on Cuba. The mostly Floridian Cubans who are fanatically anti-Castro want only the property that they and their families stole from the Cuban people during the Batista dictatorship. For this they would have us go to war and slaughter helpless Cuban peasants. Because of the failure of our blockade of Cuba, the "rush-to-foolishness" Congress passed the Helms-Burton Act, which will punish any of the corporations in countries that are friends and allies if they trade with Cuba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strewn over Julian Nava's coffee table are hundreds of photos taken on a recent trip to Cuba. A field worker with a skin infection that eats at her arms. A family so poor it cannot buy toothpaste. A newlywed couple who sleep on the floor. Each snapshot contains a story that Nava wants to record in a documentary film as he travels through Cuba during the next three weeks--ordinary lives consumed by daily struggle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Julian Nava, a former ambassador to Mexico and the first Latino to serve on the Los Angeles Board of Education, announced Friday that he intends to run for mayor on a platform that will focus on fighting crime and rebuilding the city's job base. The 65-year-old Northridge man, who was appointed ambassador to Mexico in 1979 by former President Jimmy Carter, will become the first Latino to enter the mayoral race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1992 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A middle-aged corporate lawyer and a 65-year-old college professor make an unlikely pair of demagogues. Yet their blunt comments about immigrants have made Tom Houston and Julian Nava the first in a large field of mayoral candidates to hit a political hot button.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS
In a crowded pack of uphill battlers, Julian Nava faces a steeper climb than most. His status as the only politically prominent Latino in the race evaporated when Linda Griego jumped in. Compared to the funds of leading candidates, his campaign war chest is puny. An early fund-raising effort faltered when his 800 number experienced technical difficulties. And his only burst of publicity earned him widespread criticism.
OPINION
December 13, 1992
Voting is, in essence, the people's voice in their society. To propose, as Julian Nava does, that the right to vote be given to non-citizens is absolutely ludicrous ("Immigrant Rights Heats Up Mayoral Debate," Dec. 6). If immigrants wish to have a say in this society, they must become a part of this society. Nava states that " . . . the best way to bring them (resident aliens) into the mainstream is to allow them to participate in government." If these aliens wish to participate in our government, let them start by applying for citizenship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992
Julian Nava plans to fuel his dark-horse campaign for mayor of Los Angeles with money raised from Latinos throughout the nation via a toll-free 800 phone number. The 65-year-old Cal State Northridge professor and former ambassador to Mexico confirmed Tuesday the broad outlines of his campaign to make his candidacy a national, Latino cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after Fidel Castro's historic meeting with Pope John Paul II in Rome, ending a decades-long estrangement between the Marxist leader and the Roman Catholic Church, Cal State Northridge history professor Julian Nava will premiere a video documentary on Cuba that calls for a similar rapprochement with the United States. The theme of the hourlong video: The time has come for America to end its 34-year trade embargo against the impoverished country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
Re "U.S. Policy a Barrier to Change in Cuba," by Julian Nava, April 21. Being a Cal State Northridge graduate, I am familiar with Nava's views on Cuba and on the U.S. embargo. His account of his trip to Cuba is very telling in that not a single word is said about Castro's repressive apparatus, about the lack of basic rights such as freedom of speech or of assembly, or about an all-powerful state that fully controls the lives of its subjects, despite the recently installed economic reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strewn over Julian Nava's coffee table are hundreds of photos taken on a recent trip to Cuba. A field worker with a skin infection that eats at her arms. A family so poor it cannot buy toothpaste. A newlywed couple who sleep on the floor. Each snapshot contains a story that Nava wants to record in a documentary film as he travels through Cuba during the next three weeks--ordinary lives consumed by daily struggle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993
I agree with your editorial, "Troops to Cops: Imaginative Proposal" (Sept. 19), and I urge all Americans to give the idea a fair hearing. Daily news reports describe the progressive decline and fall of Los Angeles as every part of the city falls prey to vandalism and mindless violence at all hours. Our city fathers and mayor pore over plans to add a few hundred more traditional police officers when several thousand are needed to have the same protection as Chicago or New York on a per-capita basis.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS
In a crowded pack of uphill battlers, Julian Nava faces a steeper climb than most. His status as the only politically prominent Latino in the race evaporated when Linda Griego jumped in. Compared to the funds of leading candidates, his campaign war chest is puny. An early fund-raising effort faltered when his 800 number experienced technical difficulties. And his only burst of publicity earned him widespread criticism.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | GREG KRIKORIAN
In many ways, it is the future of Los Angeles. A paradox of wealth and poverty, of gleaming skyscrapers and cardboard shelters, tree-lined streets and trash-ridden tenements. The inner city is all of these things. And because of that, it is as much a view of where Los Angeles has been--and may go--as any part of the sprawling city. So as the candidates for mayor crisscross this metropolis, promising more jobs, safer neighborhoods and tighter spending at City Hall, an obvious question is: What would they do for Central Los Angeles?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996
Re "U.S. Policy a Barrier to Change in Cuba," by Julian Nava, April 21. Being a Cal State Northridge graduate, I am familiar with Nava's views on Cuba and on the U.S. embargo. His account of his trip to Cuba is very telling in that not a single word is said about Castro's repressive apparatus, about the lack of basic rights such as freedom of speech or of assembly, or about an all-powerful state that fully controls the lives of its subjects, despite the recently installed economic reforms.
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