Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulian Rachlin
IN THE NEWS

Julian Rachlin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Violinist Julian Rachlin came to prominence at the age of 13 in 1988 after winning an international competition in Amsterdam. He promptly decided to fade back into relative obscurity. "The phone began ringing; immediately offers started coming in," Rachlin, 18, said in a recent phone interview from his home in Vienna. "All the managers wanted to engage me. Everyone wanted me to play. All around the world . . . "But I had many things to do. I had to go to school. I had to practice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2010 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical musicians never really know what's coming around the next bend in the road. You might be sitting around in your home or apartment, practicing, reading, loafing, whatever, and then the phone rings. It's your manager, and he puts it to you indirectly at first. "How's your Prokofiev Second doing?" That's how Augustin Hadelich, a rising star in the violin world, found out that he was going to make his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut at fabled Hollywood Bowl two summers ago this month.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2010 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Classical musicians never really know what's coming around the next bend in the road. You might be sitting around in your home or apartment, practicing, reading, loafing, whatever, and then the phone rings. It's your manager, and he puts it to you indirectly at first. "How's your Prokofiev Second doing?" That's how Augustin Hadelich, a rising star in the violin world, found out that he was going to make his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut at fabled Hollywood Bowl two summers ago this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Violinist Julian Rachlin came to prominence at the age of 13 in 1988 after winning an international competition in Amsterdam. He promptly decided to fade back into relative obscurity. "The phone began ringing; immediately offers started coming in," Rachlin, 18, said in a recent phone interview from his home in Vienna. "All the managers wanted to engage me. Everyone wanted me to play. All around the world . . . "But I had many things to do. I had to go to school. I had to practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | Diane Haithman
South Korean conductor Shi-Yeon Sung will replace Edo de Waart tonight at the Hollywood Bowl leading the Los Angeles Philharmonic in an all-German program of Schumann, Wagner and Brahms. De Waart canceled because of an undisclosed illness. The Dutch conductor was also slated to lead Thursday night's Bowl program, titled "The Russian Soul." Miguel Harth-Bedoya, a former Philharmonic associate conductor, will step in, while violinist Augustin Hadelich replaces the ailing Julian Rachlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000
Music Director Alexander Treger will conduct all seven concerts of the American Youth Symphony in the 2000-01 season, beginning Sunday at 8 p.m. in Royce Hall at UCLA. The opening concert will feature 12-year-old violinist Ryu Goto in his West Coast debut; he is the younger brother of another violinist, the celebrated Midori. Goto will play the Dvorak Concerto on a program also offering Steven Stucky's "Ancora" and the "Symphonie Fantastique" by Berlioz.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1999 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Fiddlers dominate the concert schedule in these first three weeks of the summer classical music season at Hollywood Bowl. And an exceptional fiddler, the 24-year-old Julian Rachlin, held the center of a Mozart program on Thursday night, the second Los Angeles Philharmonic event of this 10-week season. The Vienna-trained violinist, a native of Lithuania, brought consistent authority, a solid musicality and lustrous, controlled tone to the beauties of Mozart's G-major Concerto, K. 216.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Breaking violin strings is not always a critical matter--except during a public performance. Young Julian Rachlin broke a string Thursday night in the middle of a performance--to be precise, in the finale of Prokofiev's First Violin Concerto, with the Los Angeles Philharmonic behind him and a Dorothy Chandler Pavilion audience in front of him. Did he tear his abundant 20-year-old hair? Did he suffer a breakdown? Not at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
F rom the Mehli Mehta era onward, Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4 has been a signature display piece for the American Youth Symphony--always a chance for young musicians to vent some exuberance, always a hit with the audience. But the Fourth is also a challenge for some of us who have long since gotten over the novelties of hearing the pizzicato Scherzo, the sudden full-orchestra blast that opens the finale, the references back to earlier tunes. How do you make it sound fresh again?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1999
"Word Up! Festival of Asian American Performance," presented by the Mark Taper Forum's Asian Theatre Workshop and East West Players, spotlights works by Alec Mapa, Amy Hill, Paula Weston Solano, Dan Kwong, Dennis Dun, Alice Tuan, Eric Steinberg and James Sie. * "Word Up! Festival of Asian American Performance," East West Players, David Henry Hwang Theater, Union Center for the Arts, 120 N. Judge Aiso St., Little Tokyo. "Giant Oranges" by Dennis Dun: Thursdays-Fridays, 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1999
MOVIES Director Paul Weitz and writer Adam Herz make their feature debuts with "American Pie," an outrageous coming-of-age comedy about a group of male students who vow to lose their virginity by prom night. The ensemble cast features, from left, Jason Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth, Chris Klein and Thomas Ian Nicholas. Opens Friday in general release.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|