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Julian Schnabel

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November 1, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
" Around 1980 the art world became much more corporate and big-business tactics began to be used, and Julian was blamed for a lot of that. But he really did open things up for other artists. " --Lisa Phillips, curator, Whitney Museum " Julian's been called the artist everyone loves to hate, but I guarantee that when his show opens here it will be the biggest opening we've ever had--and people will stand around saying, 'I hate this work.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Julian Schnabel broadens his canvas for his fourth film, "Miral," turning his lens on multiple protagonists and a half-century of Middle East strife. On the face of it a bold undertaking, the Jerusalem-set feature plays out with an awkward staidness, the results not so much prismatic as fragmented. The story of four Palestinian women, "Miral" is no political tract but a Sirkian melodrama, emphasis on heartache, selfless sacrifice and often lush visuals. The painter-turned-director knows how to manipulate his widescreen images to create a rarefied atmosphere too. But while style had an illuminating power in "Basquiat," "Before Night Falls" and "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," here it feels as self-conscious as the script's simplified history lessons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People love to hate Julian Schnabel's paintings and sculptures (along with his record album and movie), but doing so usually gets in the way of seeing this ambitious artist's works for what they are. At PaceWildenstein Gallery, 13 paintings from the past 10 years and two sculptures from the 1980s reveal that Schnabel's art strives to combine the pompous grandiosity of Anselm Kiefer's paintings with the self-deprecatory sarcasm of Mike Kelley's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Israeli-Palestinian politics often prove polarizing at the United Nations, but rarely does the furor involve Hollywood celebrities and power brokers, a red carpet and a film screening at the world body's own headquarters in New York. Such was the case Monday night when the U.N. played host to the U.S. premiere of director Julian Schnabel's new film "Miral," which follows a Palestinian girl's relationship with terrorism and Israel after the 1948 war for Israeli independence. The screening was met with protests from Israel's delegation to the U.N. as well as prominent U.S.-based Jewish groups including the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League, which were outraged that the world body would open its doors to a film that even its Jewish American distributor, Harvey Weinstein, describes as "pro-Palestinian.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"I'm an artist," the painter and film director Julian Schnabel says, looking very much the part in a worn red-and-black plaid shirt open to the waist. "I make more money painting one day than I did on this movie. I did it because I had to." The picture in question, "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," premiered at Cannes on Tuesday to sustained applause.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
With assistants milling around him, Julian Schnabel looked like he was directing a movie. The painter who is also a filmmaker was walking through the south wing of MOCA's Geffen Contemporary last week calling out requests. "Could you clear out these boxes so we have a better view?" asked Schnabel, who is known for having a rather commanding presence even in a bathrobe, but on this day wore track pants and a plaid shirt. "Let's try to move that up a bit," he said with a sweeping hand gesture.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2007 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
The tented breakfast area at the Hotel Bel-Air was mostly empty on a cool, gray morning earlier this month. A well-dressed man sat in a booth. In an adjacent booth was the Golden Globe-nominated director of "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," Julian Schnabel. Schnabel, famous as a painter from the early 1980s Warhol-ian New York art scene, is a bear of a person. He arrived from his room ensconced in two shirts, an overcoat, pants with sneakers but no socks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1995 | AMEI WALLACH, NEWSDAY
The director is wearing Reeboks, untied, with no socks. His purple shirt is damp with sweat, his love beads are red and turquoise over an exceedingly hairy chest. Hard to say about the legs, since they're covered in an orange sarong. This is Julian Schnabel, the very rich and very famous enfant terrible painter of the '80s art world, as film director.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987
Hooray for Kristine McKenna and the Calendar section ("Julian Schnabel--Artist as Bad Boy," Nov. 1)! Four reasons: For the courage, maturity, tolerance and general big-heartedness to publish the (all-too-typical and apparently only) response to the article on Schnabel. For avoiding the comfort of cynicism and regionalism. For appreciating the possibly inspirational aspects of Schnabel's success. And for keeping us informed about the competition. EDWARD W. RANDELL JR. Sherman Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1987
Kristine McKenna, who wouldn't know a real artist from a bag lady or a work of art from used Kleenex, does her fawning Robin Leach number on yet another manufactured "genius" from the Big Tower of Babel Apple ("Julian Schnabel--Artist as Bad Boy," Nov. 1). Oh, spare us local yokels! Schnabel belongs in the Business Section. K.M. deserves meatier assignments--like fat farms and Tova Borgnine. JAMES STROMBOTNE Claremont
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
With assistants milling around him, Julian Schnabel looked like he was directing a movie. The painter who is also a filmmaker was walking through the south wing of MOCA's Geffen Contemporary last week calling out requests. "Could you clear out these boxes so we have a better view?" asked Schnabel, who is known for having a rather commanding presence even in a bathrobe, but on this day wore track pants and a plaid shirt. "Let's try to move that up a bit," he said with a sweeping hand gesture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2010 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angels Times
There have been many tributes to renegade actor Dennis Hopper since he died Saturday at age 74 of complications from prostate cancer. But what might be the biggest tribute to the renegade artist Dennis Hopper is yet to come: The Museum of Contemporary Art here is preparing to mount a sweeping survey of his visual art to open July 11. "Dennis Hopper Double Standard," curated by Julian Schnabel, will include artwork by Hopper from the last...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2008 | Susan King
Golden Globe-winning director (for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly") and artist Julian Schnabel was going through a rough patch emotionally back in 1973. "I had this difficulty with this girlfriend," he says, "this whole sense of loss and these problems." Then he heard Lou Reed's album "Berlin," which revolves around a doomed couple dealing with depression and drugs. "This record meant a lot to me," Schnabel recalls. "It said much to me.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
When artist Julian Schnabel made his film directing debut in 1996 with "Basquiat," there was reason to be skeptical. Two of his peers, David Salle and Robert Longo, had turned from painting to filmmaking the previous year with features ("Search and Destroy" and "Johnny Mnemonic") that could kindly be called unpromising. (Neither has directed since.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2008 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
Oscar nominee Tilda Swinton hadn't taken more than three steps inside the Gagosian Gallery on Thursday night before she was mobbed by photographers. They wasted no time enveloping the statuesque British actress in the strobe-like cocoon of flashes. "I want to look at the work!" Swinton exclaimed, seemingly taken aback. She teetered away on stiletto heels to view some art. But not just any art. On display was a series of massive-scale paintings by her fellow Oscar nominee Julian Schnabel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Jenny Sundel
TAKE a number, George! 4. Marion Cotillard momentarily leaves George Clooney -- yes, Clooney! -- hanging at the 80th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Feb. 4 to reach out to Javier Bardem. Could the lady get any luckier? Well, yes. That night, the "La Vie en Rose" star got some ice from Chopard, which hosted a tres chic soiree for the French actress at the Chateau Marmont. The theme? Red roses, of course, which filled the scarlet-lighted bungalow. Clad in a strapless Chloe stunner, la belle of the ball sipped Champagne and bonded with fellow nominees Julian Schnabel and Amy Ryan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986
I want to applaud William Wilson on the stance he's taken in reviewing so-called yuppie art. In his articles on Jennifer Bartlett (Feb. 23) and Eric Fischl (April 27), he has not been swept away by the majority of swooning art glitterati who can't pay enough to make these art school star overachievers millionaires before the paint is dry. These Post-Mod-Neo-Expressionists make one yearn for cool abstraction. Fischl's one-note gimmick of sexual repression that covers up the fact that "he makes rather boring pictures" made the point.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2007
"PEOPLE, they always criticize paintings . . . but people love to love movies," Julian Schnabel postulates. Actually, there does exist criticism of film, but unfortunately it is not to be found in Paul Brownfield's interview with the so-called neo-Expressionist painter-director ["The Eyes Have It," Dec. 22]. It is unacceptable, for instance, to premise one's plot on a cliche.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Joel and Ethan Coen made history Tuesday becoming the first sibling directing team to be nominated for a Directors Guild of America award for outstanding directorial achievement in a feature film. The iconoclastic brothers were nominated for their dark western thriller "No Country for Old Men." Joel Coen was previously nominated for the DGA award for 1996's "Fargo."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2007
"PEOPLE, they always criticize paintings . . . but people love to love movies," Julian Schnabel postulates. Actually, there does exist criticism of film, but unfortunately it is not to be found in Paul Brownfield's interview with the so-called neo-Expressionist painter-director ["The Eyes Have It," Dec. 22]. It is unacceptable, for instance, to premise one's plot on a cliche.
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