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Juliana Hatfield

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Chris Willman
Consider Juliana Hatfield the anti-Courtney. On her third album's opening track, the girlish-voiced singer rails against the rules of self-debasement ("Nasty grungy deceptive wrecked") and makes it clear that, in looking upon those who might indulgently revel in darkness for drama's sake, she's a baffled outsider ("What a life, you wear it like propriety / What a life, I watch it like a scary movie"). Ironically, Hatfield has borrowed the producers of Hole's "Live Through This," Paul Q.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN
At 27, Juliana Hatfield has finally found a way to shed her image as alternative rock's eternal adolescent: Flanking her at the Roxy on Thursday was a keyboardist and backing singer who looked all of 12. That presence was more important musically, though. Hatfield has enlarged her band from a minimalist indie-rock trio to a quintet in which her own rhythm guitar is enhanced by a second guitar, keyboards and rhythm section.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN
At 27, Juliana Hatfield has finally found a way to shed her image as alternative rock's eternal adolescent: Flanking her at the Roxy on Thursday was a keyboardist and backing singer who looked all of 12. That presence was more important musically, though. Hatfield has enlarged her band from a minimalist indie-rock trio to a quintet in which her own rhythm guitar is enhanced by a second guitar, keyboards and rhythm section.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You want answers in this life? Write Ann Landers. But if you feel totally mixed-up, terminally confused, acutely unfulfilled, and in need of somebody who can really relate , then Juliana Hatfield may be the sob sister for you. Hatfield, a winsome young Bostonian with a small, high, girlish voice and a guitar that barks, knows mixed-up and unfulfilled. It has been her stock in trade since she arrived on the college-rock scene six years ago with the Blake Babies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's another repackaging proposal for Hollywood: "Gidget Gets Depressed," starring Juliana Hatfield. Hatfield, college-rock's waif of the moment on the strength of her alternative chart hit, "My Sister," was as cute and fresh-faced as could be Wednesday night at the Coach House in her blond bangs and ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a free-lance writer based in New York
Juliana Hat field is sipping tea and discussing her new album, "Only Everything," when she feels a sudden urge to pay homage to one of the underappreciated pop heroes of the '70s: Olivia Newton-John. These days it's practically de rigueur for hip, alternative artists to profess their admiration for pop icons associated with the century's cheesiest decade. If Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon can worship Karen Carpenter, why begrudge Hatfield her fondness for the Aussie bombshell?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995
Did Juliana Hatfield steal pop reviewer Lorraine Ali's boyfriend? Her condescending aside in the Veruca Salt review ("Veruca Salt's Lasting Effect," Calendar, May 8) is one in a long line of catty swipes at Hatfield accusing her of being fluff. While Veruca Salt promises to be a viable force in music as soon as they learn to play their songs and instruments competently, Hatfield is already a veteran, and it shows in her creativity and command of her talent. Richard Marx is fluff, Madonna is fluff.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | Steve Hochman
* * 1/2 Various artists, "Reality Bites" soundtrack, RCA. Strange how bookending this collection with the Knack's "My Sharona" and Big Mountain's reggae remake of Peter Frampton's "Baby I Love Your Way" makes everything in between--including strong selections from Juliana Hatfield, Dinosaur Jr. and even U2 (the elegant "All I Want Is You")--seem like guilty-pleasure pop fluff. It offers few insights to the movie's Gen X themes, but it sure beats your average hour of radio programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noise, anger, aggression and an emphasis on grungy physicality over verbal clarity are at a premium in rock right now, reaping both commercial gains and critical applause. So what is an alternative rocker to do if, in this decade of noise-mongers like Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails, if said rocker has to admit that, deep down, he or she has the quiet, sensitive soul of a singer-songwriter?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1995
Did Juliana Hatfield steal pop reviewer Lorraine Ali's boyfriend? Her condescending aside in the Veruca Salt review ("Veruca Salt's Lasting Effect," Calendar, May 8) is one in a long line of catty swipes at Hatfield accusing her of being fluff. While Veruca Salt promises to be a viable force in music as soon as they learn to play their songs and instruments competently, Hatfield is already a veteran, and it shows in her creativity and command of her talent. Richard Marx is fluff, Madonna is fluff.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a free-lance writer based in New York
Juliana Hat field is sipping tea and discussing her new album, "Only Everything," when she feels a sudden urge to pay homage to one of the underappreciated pop heroes of the '70s: Olivia Newton-John. These days it's practically de rigueur for hip, alternative artists to profess their admiration for pop icons associated with the century's cheesiest decade. If Sonic Youth's Kim Gordon can worship Karen Carpenter, why begrudge Hatfield her fondness for the Aussie bombshell?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1995 | Chris Willman
Consider Juliana Hatfield the anti-Courtney. On her third album's opening track, the girlish-voiced singer rails against the rules of self-debasement ("Nasty grungy deceptive wrecked") and makes it clear that, in looking upon those who might indulgently revel in darkness for drama's sake, she's a baffled outsider ("What a life, you wear it like propriety / What a life, I watch it like a scary movie"). Ironically, Hatfield has borrowed the producers of Hole's "Live Through This," Paul Q.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1994 | Steve Hochman
* * 1/2 Various artists, "Reality Bites" soundtrack, RCA. Strange how bookending this collection with the Knack's "My Sharona" and Big Mountain's reggae remake of Peter Frampton's "Baby I Love Your Way" makes everything in between--including strong selections from Juliana Hatfield, Dinosaur Jr. and even U2 (the elegant "All I Want Is You")--seem like guilty-pleasure pop fluff. It offers few insights to the movie's Gen X themes, but it sure beats your average hour of radio programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's another repackaging proposal for Hollywood: "Gidget Gets Depressed," starring Juliana Hatfield. Hatfield, college-rock's waif of the moment on the strength of her alternative chart hit, "My Sister," was as cute and fresh-faced as could be Wednesday night at the Coach House in her blond bangs and ponytail.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You want answers in this life? Write Ann Landers. But if you feel totally mixed-up, terminally confused, acutely unfulfilled, and in need of somebody who can really relate , then Juliana Hatfield may be the sob sister for you. Hatfield, a winsome young Bostonian with a small, high, girlish voice and a guitar that barks, knows mixed-up and unfulfilled. It has been her stock in trade since she arrived on the college-rock scene six years ago with the Blake Babies.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
* Nelly, "Nellyville," Universal. The St. Louis rapper uses the blues to illuminate his boasts, but the beats are this album's dominant force.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Noise, anger, aggression and an emphasis on grungy physicality over verbal clarity are at a premium in rock right now, reaping both commercial gains and critical applause. So what is an alternative rocker to do if, in this decade of noise-mongers like Nirvana and Nine Inch Nails, if said rocker has to admit that, deep down, he or she has the quiet, sensitive soul of a singer-songwriter?
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