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Juliane Kohler

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March 14, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Juliane Kohler, a leading German actress, says her favorite line in the Oscar-nominated "Nowhere in Africa" occurs when her character -- a spoiled wife forced into exile by the Nazis -- surveys the remote, rain-starved Kenyan landscape of her new home and announces to her husband: "It's a beautiful country, but I cannot live here." As a star on location in an isolated Kenyan village, Kohler could relate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Juliane Kohler, a leading German actress, says her favorite line in the Oscar-nominated "Nowhere in Africa" occurs when her character -- a spoiled wife forced into exile by the Nazis -- surveys the remote, rain-starved Kenyan landscape of her new home and announces to her husband: "It's a beautiful country, but I cannot live here." As a star on location in an isolated Kenyan village, Kohler could relate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003
"Nowhere in Africa" Germany Director Caroline Link -- whose "Beyond Silence" was a 1997 foreign-language nominee -- went on location to Kenya to shoot "Nowhere in Africa," a German film about a Jewish family's self-exile during World War II. It won five German Film Awards including best picture and director. In the story, a Jewish lawyer (Merab Ninidze) flees Nazi Germany for Kenya in 1938 and soon sends for his wife (Juliane Kohler) and young daughter (Lea Kurka, later Karoline Eckertz).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
On the surface, "Nowhere in Africa's" story of a German Jewish family that fled to Kenya in 1938 to escape the Holocaust sounds familiar and uplifting, a safe and predictable piece of inescapably heartwarming cinema. But "Nowhere in Africa" is not the film you may be expecting. It's better. A whole lot better. The first hint that there is more going on here is the film's success, both critical and popular, thus far.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Aimee & Jaguar" is about falling in love, the power of love, what it gives us and the price that can be attached to its joys. It's the most familiar story in the lexicon of cinema, but watching it in this emotionally powerful film makes you feel like you've never quite seen it before.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Susan King
2 Fast 2 Furious Paul Walker, Tyrese Universal, $27 In the summer of 1991, then 22-year-old John Singleton was critically lauded for his first film, the heartfelt drama "Boyz N the Hood." The African American filmmaker subsequently became the first minority and the youngest person ever to be nominated for an Oscar for best director. Unfortunately, none of his films since has measured up critically or commercially to "Boyz." And now Singleton is a director for hire.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Even during his last 12 days on this earth, Adolf Hitler was He Who Must Be Obeyed. Despite being isolated in a claustrophobic bunker 15 feet below the rubble-strewn streets of Berlin, he remained someone whose will compelled obedience in both a despairing entourage and a defeated nation. "Downfall," the new German film that painstakingly details that period, similarly demands our attention despite its drawbacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
"A Woman in Berlin" is the best movie you're not going to see this year. You're going to read this review, maybe some others, you'll say, "That sounds good," but you won't go because the subject matter is difficult to handle. So difficult, so taboo, that it caused a scandal in Germany that lasted nearly half a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French hold the patent for telling love stories with panache. They take love seriously but treat it tersely, with an adult, knowing humor and compassion. Marion Lenoux's "Love, etc." is a perfect example, a contemporary take on the eternal triangle that actually seems fresh and alert. Charlotte Gainsbourg won a Cesar for her portrayal of an attractive 25-year-old Paris painting restorer who resorts to the personals to find a man she can love and respect.
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