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Julie Alban

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While awaiting retrial for attempted murder, Bradley Ackerman has pleaded guilty to reduced charges in a 1988 shooting that left his then-girlfriend permanently paralyzed. Ackerman, 26, the stepson of a prominent Long Beach newspaper executive, pleaded guilty Thursday to a charge of attempted second-degree murder and was sentenced to 14 years in prison.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2008 | David Haldane, Times Staff Writer
Julie Alban still grimaces when she passes her old bedroom. "This is where I crawled down the hallway to call 911," she explains, pushing her wheelchair along the polished wooden floor. "I had to pull my whole body with my arms. My elbows were all bloody." What happened that morning 20 years ago altered the course of her life and set the stage for most of what would come.
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NEWS
December 22, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
At one end of the Los Angeles courtroom sat the Albans, looking grim and determined. Hunkered uncomfortably in her wheelchair, Julie Alban, 23, trembled when the prosecuting attorney held up the gun whose bullet had severed her spinal cord. Her mother took her hand. Opposite them across the aisle, looking equally distressed, sat the Ridder/Ackerman clan with Bradley Ackerman seeming especially intent on avoiding the gaze of the former girlfriend he had shot in the back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998
Republican Assemblyman Steve Kuykendall's bid for Congress opened up this seat to contested primaries for both major parties in this swing district. The Republicans are fielding Julie Alban, a young city prosecutor from Long Beach with a compelling personal story and a family wealthy and connected enough to help bankroll her campaign. Alban was paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair several years ago when her boyfriend shot her as she broke off their romance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Daniel H. Ridder, chairman of the Long Beach Press Telegram, testified Monday at his stepson's trial for attempted murder that the young man "lost all direction and became very unhappy" after he realized that he would not be a professional tennis player. "Tennis was his whole life," a tearful Ridder said of his 24-year-old stepson, Bradley Ackerman, who never fulfilled the promise he had shown as a national teen-age tennis champion. "He started talking about whether life was worth living or not."
NEWS
April 27, 1989
Julie Alban says she has almost reached her goal of raising $10,000 in prize money for the winners of the wheelchair division of the Long Beach Marathon. "Wheelchair athletes are a model of courage and determination in the disabled community and the able-bodied world," Alban wrote in a letter she recently sent to 600 potential donors. "I would very much like to see greater equality in these races for all of the athletes." Alban, 23, has been in a wheelchair since last year when she was shot in the back by her then-boyfriend, Bradley Ackerman, the stepson of Long Beach Press Telegram Chairman Daniel H. Ridder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1988
Bradley Ackerman, taking the witness stand Thursday at his trial on charges of attempted murder, disputed the testimony of his former girlfriend, who said she had rejected his proposal of marriage shortly before he allegedly shot her in her Long Beach home. "Absolutely not," Ackerman, 24, said when asked whether Julie Alban, 23, had dashed his hopes of marriage. "We had talked about it, but I was nowhere near ready for marriage."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Apparently unimpressed by arguments that Bradley Ackerman was in a Valium-induced blackout and had unintentionally shot his girlfriend in the back, a jury Tuesday found him guilty of attempted first-degree murder. "He knew what he was doing," said Ellsworth A. Wiltz, foreman of the jury. "He was rational and conscious of the consequences of his act." The offense carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment with the possibility of parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Bradley Ackerman, newspaper heir accused of attempting to murder his girlfriend, was described by his defense attorney Wednesday as a compulsive gambler and Valium user who unintentionally shot Julie Alban while he was trying to kill himself. "There is very little question about what happened," attorney Anthony Murray said during opening arguments of Ackerman's trial in Los Angeles Superior Court. "Bradley fired the gun, and what resulted is a profound and irreversible tragedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
The neighborhood is one of the most exclusive in Long Beach, with $1-million homes and quiet streets shaded by pepper trees that rustle in the summer breeze. Here in a sprawling six-bedroom house, Julie Alban is learning to live without the use of her legs. "I have a life consisting of the most tedious tasks," says Alban, 22, a former member of her high school tennis team. "Just dressing myself is a task now." The family of the man accused of shooting her lives across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Republican women who showed up for a lunch of chicken Caesar salad at the Long Beach Yacht Club were faced with the toughest of choices as they listened to three of the GOP candidates running in the Legislature's 54th Assembly District primary election. Should they support Long Beach City Councilman Doug Drummond, a local political fixture whom most of the women had supported over the years?
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been moments of despair during the last five years, when Julie Alban did not think she would make it. Sitting in a wheelchair with a bullet in her spine, in constant and almost unbearable pain, she sometimes gave in to deep depression; her plans to become a lawyer seemed like a faint and impossible dream. "There were many times I felt like giving up," Alban said during a recent interview on the patio of her Dana Point home. "Times when I felt totally overwhelmed by my situation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There have been moments of despair during the past five years when Julie Alban didn't think she'd make it. Sitting in a wheelchair with a bullet in her spine, in constant and almost unbearable pain, she sometimes succumbed to a deep depression; her plans to become a lawyer seemed like a faint and impossible dream. "There were many times I felt like giving up," Alban said during a recent interview on the patio of her Dana Point home. "Times when I felt totally overwhelmed by my situation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While awaiting retrial for attempted murder, Bradley Ackerman has pleaded guilty to reduced charges in a 1988 shooting that left his then-girlfriend permanently paralyzed. Ackerman, 26, the stepson of a prominent Long Beach newspaper executive, pleaded guilty Thursday to a charge of attempted second-degree murder and was sentenced to 14 years in prison.
NEWS
April 27, 1989
Julie Alban says she has almost reached her goal of raising $10,000 in prize money for the winners of the wheelchair division of the Long Beach Marathon. "Wheelchair athletes are a model of courage and determination in the disabled community and the able-bodied world," Alban wrote in a letter she recently sent to 600 potential donors. "I would very much like to see greater equality in these races for all of the athletes." Alban, 23, has been in a wheelchair since last year when she was shot in the back by her then-boyfriend, Bradley Ackerman, the stepson of Long Beach Press Telegram Chairman Daniel H. Ridder.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
At one end of the Los Angeles courtroom sat the Albans, looking grim and determined. Hunkered uncomfortably in her wheelchair, Julie Alban, 23, trembled when the prosecuting attorney held up the gun whose bullet had severed her spinal cord. Her mother took her hand. Opposite them across the aisle, looking equally distressed, sat the Ridder/Ackerman clan with Bradley Ackerman seeming especially intent on avoiding the gaze of the former girlfriend he had shot in the back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1998 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Republican women who showed up for a lunch of chicken Caesar salad at the Long Beach Yacht Club were faced with the toughest of choices as they listened to three of the GOP candidates running in the Legislature's 54th Assembly District primary election. Should they support Long Beach City Councilman Doug Drummond, a local political fixture whom most of the women had supported over the years?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998
Republican Assemblyman Steve Kuykendall's bid for Congress opened up this seat to contested primaries for both major parties in this swing district. The Republicans are fielding Julie Alban, a young city prosecutor from Long Beach with a compelling personal story and a family wealthy and connected enough to help bankroll her campaign. Alban was paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair several years ago when her boyfriend shot her as she broke off their romance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Apparently unimpressed by arguments that Bradley Ackerman was in a Valium-induced blackout and had unintentionally shot his girlfriend in the back, a jury Tuesday found him guilty of attempted first-degree murder. "He knew what he was doing," said Ellsworth A. Wiltz, foreman of the jury. "He was rational and conscious of the consequences of his act." The offense carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment with the possibility of parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1988 | DAVID HALDANE, Times Staff Writer
Daniel H. Ridder, chairman of the Long Beach Press Telegram, testified Monday at his stepson's trial for attempted murder that the young man "lost all direction and became very unhappy" after he realized that he would not be a professional tennis player. "Tennis was his whole life," a tearful Ridder said of his 24-year-old stepson, Bradley Ackerman, who never fulfilled the promise he had shown as a national teen-age tennis champion. "He started talking about whether life was worth living or not."
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