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Julie Cart

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SPORTS
September 13, 1986
As a lifelong tennis player and pro, I congratulate Julie Cart on her intelligent, witty and fresh approach on reporting the U.S. Open. Thanks, Julie. ELEANOR HARBULA Sylmar
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | Julie Cart
Police responding to a call Sunday morning about an injured person found the body of a woman in a residence in the 800 block of Moffat Circle. Officers determined the death to be a homicide but released no additional details. -- Julie Cart
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | Julie Cart
Police responding to a call Sunday morning about an injured person found the body of a woman in a residence in the 800 block of Moffat Circle. Officers determined the death to be a homicide but released no additional details. -- Julie Cart
SPORTS
February 1, 1996 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever neighborhood my family lived in while I was growing up, and for a long while it was a different one each year, boys always knocked on our door and asked, "Can Julie come out to play?" Before my mother had a chance to say no, I rushed past her and was off, embroiled in some game. I grew up surrounded by boys--my two older brothers, our closest family friends and their four sons and my pack of rough-and-tumble cousins, mostly boys. If I was to have playmates, they were to be boys.
SPORTS
November 12, 1994
In their article on the problems of getting Major League Soccer off the ground (Nov. 9), Julie Cart and Grahame Jones rhetorically ponder as to who will have the last laugh. The answer is clear: Alan Rothenberg, the man who goes home with $7 million of World Cup money no matter what happens with MLS. JOHN McDERMOTT San Francisco
SPORTS
June 19, 1993
I was very surprised to read the report from Julie Cart on the U.S.-Germany soccer match, in which she gave the impression that the U.S. team was humiliated. While it is true that a large percentage of the action was in the home team's half of the field, the U.S. defense did not make life easy for the World Cup champions and the score of 4-3 shows how well the U.S. capitalized on its few opportunities. There is no disgrace in that score. To the contrary, it is a very impressive result.
SPORTS
February 1, 1996 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whatever neighborhood my family lived in while I was growing up, and for a long while it was a different one each year, boys always knocked on our door and asked, "Can Julie come out to play?" Before my mother had a chance to say no, I rushed past her and was off, embroiled in some game. I grew up surrounded by boys--my two older brothers, our closest family friends and their four sons and my pack of rough-and-tumble cousins, mostly boys. If I was to have playmates, they were to be boys.
SPORTS
May 17, 1995 | JULIE CART
Athletes speak of "muscle memory," a reflexive movement achieved by repetition and practice. But what of other aspects of competition? Does adrenaline always know when to surge? Will confidence remember to play its part? Four somewhat retired tennis players--Jimmy Connors, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg and Guillermo Vilas--maintain that their competitive instincts are intact. The players' competitive memories will be aroused at a four-man tournament beginning Friday at the Pebble Beach Tennis Center.
SPORTS
January 23, 1987 | JULIE CART
It was a startling announcement. The government of Ontario will spend $1.4 million (Canadian) over the next 15 months to promote safety in sports, with an emphasis on ending violence in hockey. "We will be introducing an amendment, and then the power will be there to legislate whatever we feel is necessary to reduce violence and increase the safety for all sports," said John Eakins, Ontario's minister of tourism and recreation, in making the announcement last week.
SPORTS
May 28, 1995 | Julie Cart
The greening of Venus Williams has begun. Williams, 15, has played in one professional tournament since turning pro last October and continues to be ardently courted by management companies. There is speculation that her father, Richard Williams, is trying to swing a package deal that includes his youngest daughter, Serena. The announcement last week that Venus signed a multiyear contract with Reebok comes as no surprise.
SPORTS
January 22, 1996 | JULIE CART
Tennis served up a tumultuous, fascinating year in 1995. Any sport would be pleased to have produced such moments. Among the best: --Pete Sampras' head-on collision with the fragility of life when his coach, Tim Gullikson, fell gravely ill at the Australian Open. Sampras was overcome with emotion during his quarterfinal match. Why did it take his crying on court to show us he has a big heart?
SPORTS
December 24, 1995 | Julie Cart
A few thoughts on the announcement by Stefan Edberg that he will retire after next season: --The sport will miss his playing style more than it knows. Edberg is one of the last all-court players. He's a serve-and-volley player whose serve can be detected by the naked eye. His volley is textbook and Edberg is light on his feet, swift in a way that defines grace and movement of another era.
SPORTS
December 11, 1995 | JULIE CART
Pete Sampras has nothing left to prove, or give, regarding Davis Cup. With his heroic performance in the Davis Cup final last week, Sampras--who always has an eye fixed on his sport's history books--has assured himself an honored place in them. Fighting through injury and fatigue, Sampras became the first American since John McEnroe in 1982 to win three points in the Davis Cup finals. It is no discredit to his teammates to say that Sampras single-handedly won the Davis Cup for the United States.
SPORTS
December 10, 1995 | JULIE CART
Pete Sampras has nothing left to prove, or give, regarding Davis Cup. With his heroic performance in the Davis Cup final last week, Sampras--a player who always has an eye fixed on his sport's history books--has assured himself an honored place in them. Fighting through injury and fatigue, Sampras became the first American since John McEnroe in 1982 to win three points in the Davis Cup finals.
SPORTS
November 13, 1995 | JULIE CART
First came the lightning flash of the announcement, then silence. Now, the sound of thunder. A storm is brewing in women's tennis. A few weeks ago, the Australian Open announced it was increasing the men's prize money by 17%, but the women's by only 6%. Officials explained the change as economically driven, saying men's matches consistently earned higher TV ratings. For a decade, the Australian Open had been awarding equal prize money.
SPORTS
November 12, 1995 | Julie Cart
First came the lightening flash of the announcement, then silence. Now, the sound of thunder. A storm is brewing in women's tennis. A few weeks ago, the Australian Open announced it was increasing the men's prize money by 17%, but the women's by only 6%. Officials explained the change as economically driven, saying the men's matches consistently earned higher television ratings. For a decade, the Australian Open had been awarding equal prize money.
SPORTS
February 19, 1995 | Julie Cart
Pete Sampras is regrouping on many levels: His coach is seriously ill and isn't likely to be to be on tour with Sampras again soon. His fragile body took a huge pounding over two weeks at last month's Australian Open. He's getting used to a new coach/hitting partner. His No. 1 ranking, which he has held since Sept. 13, 1993, is in jeopardy after Andre Agassi beat him in the Australian Open final. Life is now much more complicated for Sampras, who has been smacked in the face with reality.
SPORTS
February 1, 1994 | JULIE CART
The problems on the Russian national soccer team, which Coach Pavel Sadyrin called "normal," threaten to disrupt the team's World Cup preparations. Sadyrin dismissed the problems Saturday night in Seattle, where the United States tied a depleted Russian squad, 1-1. More than half of the national team refused to make the trip.
SPORTS
October 30, 1995 | JULIE CART
Late in getting back from a photo shoot for People magazine, Monica Seles was harried during a conference call last week. Same old story for Seles, who has been in a whirlwind since her comeback in August. Little surprise, then, that she began by detailing what she has been doing since losing to Steffi Graf in the U.S. Open final in September. "I was both mentally and physically drained after the Open because of everything that was happening to me, on and off the court," she said.
SPORTS
October 29, 1995 | Julie Cart
Late in getting back from a photo shoot for People magazine, Monica Seles was harried during a conference call last week. Same old, same old for Seles, who has been gingerly moving within a whirlwind since her comeback in August. Little surprise, then, that she began by detailing what she has been doing since losing to Steffi Graf in the U.S. Open final in September.
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