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Julie Christie

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1990 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Julie Christie doesn't make many films these days and rarely sees her old movies. She was thrilled to work with such directors as John Schlesinger and Sir David Lean and amazed she had the courage to arrive on the set each day. But don't expect her to recite dialogue from those movies. Now 49, and feeling much calmer, the Academy Award winner and icon of 1960s "Swinging London" prefers to think of the locations where she made the films. There's India, the setting for "Heat and Dust."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
In “The Company You Keep,” the new film directed by Robert Redford, the Oscar winner also stars as a onetime political radical who has lived for decades as a fugitive from justice under a false identity. When the quiet, stable life he has created for himself is jeopardized, he is set back on the run to clear his name once and for all. The film, which opens Friday, has an impressive cast that includes Shia LaBeouf, Anna Kendrick, Brendan Gleeson, Brit Marling, Stanley Tucci, Terrence Howard, Richard Jenkins, Chris Cooper, Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1998 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early in "Afterglow," Julie Christie, playing a melancholy ex-B-movie actress (Norma Desmond meets Mrs. Robinson), sardonically suggests that her soul needs an overhaul. It's not only a defining moment for this character but a culmination for Christie--who's made a career playing lonely girls and women who just wanna have fun and are clueless when it's over. The only difference is that Christie is no B-movie actress. Far from it.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The "world's oldest profession" has long been a favorite subject in novels, plays, films and television. Real-life madams such as Sydney Biddle Barrows, a.k.a. the Mayflower Madam, and Heidi Fleiss, the Hollywood Madam, have captured the attention of the media and filmmakers for decades. And let's face it, Miss Kitty (Amanda Blake) on the long-running western series "Gunsmoke" wasn't just serving drinks to Marshal Dillon ( James Arness) and the boys at the Long Branch saloon — and the second floor of her establishment was more than just a boarding house (even if censors of the time wouldn't allow anyone to say that)
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
THE 1967 photo book "Birds of Britain" refers to actress Julie Christie as "the very incarnation of the new British girl." Though it has long been inappropriate to refer to her as either a bird or a girl, there is still something remarkably fresh about her, a hard-won mix of the carefree and the don't-mess-with-me. To say they don't make movie stars like Julie Christie anymore would perhaps incorrectly imply that they ever really did.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Susan Heeger, Heeger is a fiction writer who reviews frequently for The Times. and
As any child knows, one of life's great pleasures is tucking up in a heap of covers while someone--preferably one's mother--reads a long, wonderful book aloud. As the growing popularity of books on tape suggests, many adults are rediscovering this pleasure--both as entertainment and as a solution to a lack of reading time. Thomas Hardy's "Far From the Madding Crowd," a new addition to the Listen for Pleasure series, works well on both counts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1997 | Charles Champlin, Charles Champlin is an occasional contributor to Calendar
Julie Christie stars in Alan Rudolph's new film "Afterglow," in which she plays a retired B-movie star who lives in Montreal with her husband (Nick Nolte), a handyman especially handy with his female clientele. His wife spends her days watching her old films, which were obviously awful black-and-white costume dramas (glimpsed in wonderful re-creations for the movie).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Actress Julie Christie seems to be on everyone's short-list as a possible Oscar winner this year for her role as a woman with Alzheimer's disease in the film "Away From Her." But when she accepted the best actress prize at last month's Screen Actors Guild Awards show in L.A., Christie made a last-second quip on camera that some view as insensitivity about the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | KEVIN CRUST
The swirls of golden hair, the piercing blue eyes, the lilting British accent . . . it was the first time I remember seeing and hearing Julie Christie. The year was 1978, the film was "Heaven Can Wait," and I was every bit as flummoxed and enchanted as Warren Beatty's Joe Pendleton. I was so smitten I even read the novelization. Little did I know that she was an Oscar winner known for her beauty and the subtlety of her acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Actress Julie Christie seems to be on everyone's short-list as a possible Oscar winner this year for her role as a woman with Alzheimer's disease in the film "Away From Her." But when she accepted the best actress prize at last month's Screen Actors Guild Awards show in L.A., Christie made a last-second quip on camera that some view as insensitivity about the disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008 | KEVIN CRUST
The swirls of golden hair, the piercing blue eyes, the lilting British accent . . . it was the first time I remember seeing and hearing Julie Christie. The year was 1978, the film was "Heaven Can Wait," and I was every bit as flummoxed and enchanted as Warren Beatty's Joe Pendleton. I was so smitten I even read the novelization. Little did I know that she was an Oscar winner known for her beauty and the subtlety of her acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"There Will be Blood," Paul Thomas Anderson's epic tale of oil, power and greed, was named best picture of 2007 on Saturday by the National Society of Film Critics. The complex and ambitious adaptation of Upton Sinclair's "Oil!" also won best director for Anderson, best actor for Daniel Day-Lewis and best cinematography for Robert Elswit. Both the drama and Day-Lewis have been gaining momentum this awards season. Last month, the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Joel and Ethan Coen's "No Country for Old Men" received best picture honors Monday from the New York Film Critics Circle. The gritty film noir based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy dominated the critics' picks, winning a total of four awards. Besides best film, "No Country" won best director and screenplay honors for the Coen brothers, and Javier Bardem picked up best supporting actor for his role as a coldblooded hit man with neatly coiffed hair.
NEWS
November 14, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
THE 1967 photo book "Birds of Britain" refers to actress Julie Christie as "the very incarnation of the new British girl." Though it has long been inappropriate to refer to her as either a bird or a girl, there is still something remarkably fresh about her, a hard-won mix of the carefree and the don't-mess-with-me. To say they don't make movie stars like Julie Christie anymore would perhaps incorrectly imply that they ever really did.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998
Last week's Top 5 rentals: "As Good as It Gets," "Starship Troopers," "Mouse Hunt," "Tomorrow Never Dies" and "The Jackal." Last week's Top 5 sellers: "As Good as It Gets," "Face/Off," "Con Air," "Anastasia," "Mouse Hunt." What's New In stores this week: "Scream 2" (Dimension), Wes Craven's hit horror flick. (R). 'Afterglow" (Columbia TriStar), romantic drama starring Julie Christie. (R). "The Postman" (Warner), Kevin Costner's action-adventure. (PG-13).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
In “The Company You Keep,” the new film directed by Robert Redford, the Oscar winner also stars as a onetime political radical who has lived for decades as a fugitive from justice under a false identity. When the quiet, stable life he has created for himself is jeopardized, he is set back on the run to clear his name once and for all. The film, which opens Friday, has an impressive cast that includes Shia LaBeouf, Anna Kendrick, Brendan Gleeson, Brit Marling, Stanley Tucci, Terrence Howard, Richard Jenkins, Chris Cooper, Sam Elliott and Nick Nolte.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998
Damon Runyon's '40s-era Broadway comes alive in "Guys and Dolls," the Frank Loesser-Abe Burrows musical with all those great Loesser songs ("Luck Be a Lady," "I'll Know," "If I Were a Bell") presented by Civic Light Opera of South Bay Cities. * "Guys and Dolls," Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center, 1935 Manhattan Beach Blvd. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7 p.m.; Saturdays-Sundays, 2 p.m. through March 15. $30-$45. (310) 372-4477.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1998 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early in "Afterglow," Julie Christie, playing a melancholy ex-B-movie actress (Norma Desmond meets Mrs. Robinson), sardonically suggests that her soul needs an overhaul. It's not only a defining moment for this character but a culmination for Christie--who's made a career playing lonely girls and women who just wanna have fun and are clueless when it's over. The only difference is that Christie is no B-movie actress. Far from it.
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