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Julie Croteau

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SPORTS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
The first woman to play college baseball left her team, citing sexism among her teammates, coach and athletic director. Her college said she was reacting to isolated incidents. Julie Croteau, who has just finished her junior year, said she has taken a leave of absence from St. Mary's (Md.) College for at least a semester and might transfer.
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SPORTS
June 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
The first woman to play college baseball left her team, citing sexism among her teammates, coach and athletic director. Her college said she was reacting to isolated incidents. Julie Croteau, who has just finished her junior year, said she has taken a leave of absence from St. Mary's (Md.) College for at least a semester and might transfer.
SPORTS
March 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Julie Croteau knows not to dig into the batter's box. She's seen a few fastballs whiz by her chin. Several pitchers have hit her, too. But despite the temptation, she's never charged the mound. "I'm not crazy," the first woman to play in an NCAA baseball game said. "Not unless I had a bat with me. I'm a pretty nasty little girl but I think that most pitchers could probably take me." She's 18 years old, stands 5 feet, 7 1/2 inches, weighs 126 pounds and doesn't seem to be all that nasty.
SPORTS
March 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Julie Croteau knows not to dig into the batter's box. She's seen a few fastballs whiz by her chin. Several pitchers have hit her, too. But despite the temptation, she's never charged the mound. "I'm not crazy," the first woman to play in an NCAA baseball game said. "Not unless I had a bat with me. I'm a pretty nasty little girl but I think that most pitchers could probably take me." She's 18 years old, stands 5 feet, 7 1/2 inches, weighs 126 pounds and doesn't seem to be all that nasty.
SPORTS
February 25, 1989 | Associated Press
An 18-year-old St. Mary's College freshman appears to be the only woman in the country who has earned a place as one of the guys on a varsity baseball squad, and her acceptance comes after years of uphill battles. Julie Croteau of Manassas, Va., a first baseman who bats and throws left-handed, says she has noticed signs of acceptance by her college teammates--such as no more apologies for swearing and no exceptions when they yell, "Come on, guys."
SPORTS
February 1, 1995 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ila Borders was flattered when the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame approached her about setting up an exhibit to commemorate her status as the first woman to start and win a college baseball game. But Borders was unprepared for the letter from Cooperstown, inviting her to send items for an exhibit in the baseball Hall of Fame. "I opened the letter and I had to read it again to make sure that I read it right," said Borders, a sophomore at Southern California College. "I think of Nolan Ryan.
SPORTS
April 4, 1989 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
Heather Drummond is a left fielder on Katella High School's freshman baseball team. And she'd like it to be as simple as that. No fanfare. Just another one of the players, hoping to do her best, improve and make the varsity some day. She'd like to play more. She has played only two innings and has one at-bat, a groundout to third base, in eight games, but other than that, things are going as well as can be expected. Drummond isn't trying to make a point or a stand of any kind.
SPORTS
February 4, 1993 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ila Borders, the only known female baseball pitcher in the Southern Section, will break into even rarer ground after accepting a partial scholarship to play college baseball at Southern California College. Borders, a senior pitcher at Whittier Christian High, signed a letter of intent in December to play for the Vanguards, SCC Coach Charlie Phillips said Wednesday. Although the historical record is sketchy, officials at the National Assn.
SPORTS
February 5, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
Ila Borders doesn't want to be in a league of her own. It's not what she's about. She's not looking to break barriers, or to be one of a kind. She doesn't wish to be a symbol. But sign a letter of intent with a collegiate baseball team--as Borders did with Southern California College--and suddenly you're more than just another recruit. You're big news, a front-page story, a female pitcher with a cause. You're the Whittier Christian senior doing all you can to strike out sexism.
OPINION
August 27, 2006 | Jennifer Ring, JENNIFER RING, a professor of political science at the University of Nevada, Reno, is the author of "Stolen Bases: Why American Girls Don't Play Baseball," to be published next year.
IF YOU'RE A baseball fan, you should know what took place Aug. 1-6. Eighteen American baseball players flew to Taipei, Taiwan, as the best women's team in the United States -- and returned to Los Angeles as the best women's team in the world. You didn't know that? The Japanese media covered the tournament, held at Tienmu Baseball Stadium, that included teams from Canada, Australia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, Cuba and the U.S. But there was no ESPN booth, no U.S.
SPORTS
February 24, 1993 | GARY KLEIN
Casey Burrill of USC was confident that arm surgery would cure his throwing problems and enable him to resume his career as a catcher, but hardly expected the procedure to make him a better person. Burrill, a senior from Newhall, had surgery after his sophomore season. Last year, he played first base and was a designated hitter while transfer Bobby Hughes established himself as one of the nation's best catchers.
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