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Julie Dash

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Dash, in her boldly experimental first feature, "Daughters of the Dust," evokes the West African culture preserved on the islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina. Dash has created a film that is more ritual than drama, dealing with the spiritual struggle between women of several generations over whether to preserve or to disavow ancestral beliefs and practices as their family prepares for its exodus to the North.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Dash, in her boldly experimental first feature, "Daughters of the Dust," evokes the West African culture preserved on the islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina. Dash has created a film that is more ritual than drama, dealing with the spiritual struggle between women of several generations over whether to preserve or to disavow ancestral beliefs and practices as their family prepares for its exodus to the North.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Daughters of the Dust" is a film with a lot on its mind, but one that wears its agendas with lyrical lightness. A poetic attempt to recreate a bygone culture as not only a role model for the present but also a positive mythology for the future, "Daughters' " strong visual qualities and epic emotions make it a bracing remedy to swallow.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Daughters of the Dust" is a film with a lot on its mind, but one that wears its agendas with lyrical lightness. A poetic attempt to recreate a bygone culture as not only a role model for the present but also a positive mythology for the future, "Daughters' " strong visual qualities and epic emotions make it a bracing remedy to swallow.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011
In the director's chair Here's a look at three talents from the "L.A. Rebellion" period: Julie Dash Dash is celebrating the 20th anniversary of her feature "Daughters of the Dust," which is part of the Library of Congress' National Film Registry. Charles Burnett The director's lauded first full-length feature, 1977's "Killer of Sheep," was written as his UCLA master's thesis. Haile Gerima The Ethiopian-born Gerima took his 1993 film "Sankofa" to 35 different cities himself when he couldn't find a distributor.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1993
The Black American Cinema Society (BACS) has set Feb. 18 as its deadline for submissions to qualify for its 11th annual independent and student filmmakers awards. Sponsored by the Western States Black Research Center and its founder, Dr. Mayme Clayton, the event has honored more than 60 African-American filmmakers, including the then-unknown Julie Dash, Reginald Hudlin and Marlon Riggs. Winners from this national competition will be recognized at a March 21 gala at the Biltmore Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS
Garret C. Williams, an American Film Institute graduate student, took the first prize of $3,000 in the Black American Cinema Society's 11th annual independent filmmaker competition during the weekend in Hollywood. He won for his 30-minute "Helicopter," a story of a young man's vicarious dreams of success for his best friend. Second prize, worth $2,000, went to Koina L. Freeman for "Little Black Panther," based on her experiences as the child of a founder of the Black Panther Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Adisa and writer Avery O. Williams' 24-minute "Notes in a Minor Key," took the first prize of $3,000 in the Black American Cinema Society's 12th annual African American independent filmmakers' competition. It's an evocative and powerful vignette in which a grandfather (Keith David), once a jazz musician on the cusp of fame, reveals a terrible secret to his grandson. Judging was held last Saturday at Eastman Kodak in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The theme of the forgotten, which dominates this year's American Film Institute National Video Festival (continuing through Sunday at various locations on the AFI campus, 2021 N. Western Ave., Hollywood; free admission) is acutely felt in the program of Hawaiian videomakers (12:15 p.m. today), which shows trouble in "paradise."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON, Nina J. Easton is a Times staff writer
In the world of independent film, director Julie Dash is drawing a strong following as a fresh and innovative voice. Her ambitious "Daughters of the Dust"--set on the Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast in the early 1900s--earned top honors for its lush cinematography at this year's Sundance Film Festival. But Dash can't even get a Hollywood agent. In August, friends sponsored a screening of the film on Sony Pictures' Culver City lot--hoping for a turnout of influential insiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Film maker Julie Dash will be presented a $1,500 first prize on Feb. 1 at the third annual Black American Cinema Society awards at the Ambassador Hotel for "Illusions," a drama about a black female executive (played by "The Cotton Club's" Lonette McKee) passing for white at a Hollywood studio during World War II. Second prize of $1,000 will be presented to Iverson White for "Dark Exodus," a work in progress about the impact of a lynching upon a Southern black family of the '20s.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | SUSAN KING
"Hollywood Style": The premiere episode explores how Hollywood movies' emphasis on story and character has influenced cinematography, acting, editing, lighting and production design. Directors Sydney Pollack, Martin Scorsese and the late Joseph Mankiewicz are featured. Monday. "The Star": An examination of the public's love affair with movie personalities and how becoming a star totally alters an actor's life. Julia Roberts and the late Joan Crawford are the focus. Monday.
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