Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulie Davis
IN THE NEWS

Julie Davis

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Never mind that their films aren't in competition, that their names won't be mentioned when the Sundance Film Festival hands out its make-or-break awards. From different ends of the experience continuum, writer-directors Victor Nun~ez and Julie Davis are emblematic of both the struggles and the successes of independent filmmaking, and their presence here reaffirms why this event, the strains of its ever-increasing celebrity notwithstanding, continues to matter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Henry Jaglom films dare you to forego your appetite for slickness, cohesion and subtlety, and in the cases when they succeed, it's because the iconoclastic writer-director's upfront sincerity and satire - usually at the expense of Hollywood - are enough. But his latest, "Just 45 Minutes From Broadway," an adaptation of his own play, is an investment in theatrical self-indulgence with diminishing returns. A queasy paean to show folk, it concerns the fraught reunion of two estranged sisters - emotionally unstable New York stage actress Pandora (Jaglom's open nerve muse Tanna Frederick)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Henry Jaglom films dare you to forego your appetite for slickness, cohesion and subtlety, and in the cases when they succeed, it's because the iconoclastic writer-director's upfront sincerity and satire - usually at the expense of Hollywood - are enough. But his latest, "Just 45 Minutes From Broadway," an adaptation of his own play, is an investment in theatrical self-indulgence with diminishing returns. A queasy paean to show folk, it concerns the fraught reunion of two estranged sisters - emotionally unstable New York stage actress Pandora (Jaglom's open nerve muse Tanna Frederick)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
When Julie Davis arrived in Los Angeles two decades ago with a pipe dream, she hoped she might end up directing a movie at a big Hollywood studio. She never imagined that she'd end up in a dark room at the Playboy Channel editing hard-core pornography. Davis, then in her early 20s, had recently graduated from the editing program at the American Film Institute, but she still couldn't find a job. Even though she also had an Ivy League diploma from Dartmouth College, she found herself flipping through the back pages of Variety, searching for any possible entry into the film world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"I Love You, Don't Touch Me!" is a comedy of eros, an amusing and mischievous look at the push-pull ambivalence and confusion that accompanies the quest for pure and perfect romance in a world that values physical thrills, not eternal commitment. Written, directed, co-produced, edited and just about willed into existence by 27-year-old Julie Davis, "I Love You" is also the debut of a fresh new voice, one that's honest, sexy and consistently funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wording in a 1990 funding bill intended to ban federal grants to obscene artworks by the National Endowment for the Arts fails tests of constitutionality on at least three different grounds, according to the arts endowment's general counsel. Julie Davis, the NEA's top lawyer, questioned the constitutionality of the controversial obscenity-control language in an appearance Tuesday before a House appropriations subcommittee chaired by Rep. Sidney Yates (D-Ill.).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advisory board to the National Endowment for the Arts was warned here Friday that support for the NEA within the largest arts advocacy unit in Congress may have been dangerously eroded. The situation prompted members of the National Council on the Arts and key arts support groups to observe--many for the first time publicly--that the situation poses potentially fatal new political problems for the beleaguered arts agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Endowment for the Arts will retain a controversial requirement that grantees sign an anti-obscenity pledge, despite the rejection, or threatened rejection, of more than $1.3 million in 1990 grants.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2010 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
When Julie Davis arrived in Los Angeles two decades ago with a pipe dream, she hoped she might end up directing a movie at a big Hollywood studio. She never imagined that she'd end up in a dark room at the Playboy Channel editing hard-core pornography. Davis, then in her early 20s, had recently graduated from the editing program at the American Film Institute, but she still couldn't find a job. Even though she also had an Ivy League diploma from Dartmouth College, she found herself flipping through the back pages of Variety, searching for any possible entry into the film world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Amy's Orgasm" is a sophisticated romantic comedy much like "Kissing Jessica Stein." Like Jessica, Julie Davis' Amy Mandell is beautiful, intelligent, Jewish--and unattached. Jessica's inability to find Mr. Right leads her to experiment with her own sex, but Amy's predicament is more challenging. While Jessica was a respected feature writer for a New York newspaper, Amy is a nationally renowned self-help author whose primary message is that women don't need men to feel fulfilled.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Amy's Orgasm" is a sophisticated romantic comedy much like "Kissing Jessica Stein." Like Jessica, Julie Davis' Amy Mandell is beautiful, intelligent, Jewish--and unattached. Jessica's inability to find Mr. Right leads her to experiment with her own sex, but Amy's predicament is more challenging. While Jessica was a respected feature writer for a New York newspaper, Amy is a nationally renowned self-help author whose primary message is that women don't need men to feel fulfilled.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"I Love You, Don't Touch Me!" is a comedy of eros, an amusing and mischievous look at the push-pull ambivalence and confusion that accompanies the quest for pure and perfect romance in a world that values physical thrills, not eternal commitment. Written, directed, co-produced, edited and just about willed into existence by 27-year-old Julie Davis, "I Love You" is also the debut of a fresh new voice, one that's honest, sexy and consistently funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Never mind that their films aren't in competition, that their names won't be mentioned when the Sundance Film Festival hands out its make-or-break awards. From different ends of the experience continuum, writer-directors Victor Nun~ez and Julie Davis are emblematic of both the struggles and the successes of independent filmmaking, and their presence here reaffirms why this event, the strains of its ever-increasing celebrity notwithstanding, continues to matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Endowment for the Arts will retain a controversial requirement that grantees sign an anti-obscenity pledge, despite the rejection, or threatened rejection, of more than $1.3 million in 1990 grants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advisory board to the National Endowment for the Arts was warned here Friday that support for the NEA within the largest arts advocacy unit in Congress may have been dangerously eroded. The situation prompted members of the National Council on the Arts and key arts support groups to observe--many for the first time publicly--that the situation poses potentially fatal new political problems for the beleaguered arts agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wording in a 1990 funding bill intended to ban federal grants to obscene artworks by the National Endowment for the Arts fails tests of constitutionality on at least three different grounds, according to the arts endowment's general counsel. Julie Davis, the NEA's top lawyer, questioned the constitutionality of the controversial obscenity-control language in an appearance Tuesday before a House appropriations subcommittee chaired by Rep. Sidney Yates (D-Ill.).
BUSINESS
March 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
Credit card information from customers of more than 100 DSW Shoe Warehouse stores was stolen from a company computer's database over the last three months, a lawyer for the national chain said. The company discovered the theft of credit card and personal shopping information Friday and reported it to federal authorities, said Julie Davis, general counsel for the shoe-store chain's parent, Retail Ventures Inc. Retail Ventures shares fell 6 cents to $7.30 on the NYSE.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1998
The Money Make-Over for the Gottliebs ["Ambitious Couple Are Comfortable but Restless," Dec. 15] was typical of a financial planner, spending so much time with the figures and forgetting common sense. MBAs can commonly be attained through night schools or executive programs that are held on weekends, such as those at UC Irvine or Pepperdine. Jamey could retain his present job while earning his MBA. Seems like a no-brainer to me; that's the type of decision-making process taught in MBA courses.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|