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Julie Delpy

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December 14, 1997 | Steve Hochman
The Parisian part of "An American Werewolf in Paris" came naturally to Julie Delpy--she was born and raised in the City of Light. A favorite in European cinema ("White," "Europa Europa"), she's become a fixture in American movies ("Before Sunrise," "Killing Zoe"). A West Hollywood resident for five years, Delpy, 27, is moving ahead as a writer and director with "Blah Blah Blah" and "Tell Me." AC-CENT-TCHU-ATE: "I'm closer and closer to a real American accent. It's important for getting roles.
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February 6, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
It has been said that every movie is made three times: in the writing, in the shooting and in the editing. At the Writers Guild of America Awards last Sunday, "Captain Phillips" scribe Billy Ray paid tribute to the latter stages upon winning the prize for adapted screenplay. (The film is based on Richard Phillips and Stephan Talty's book "A Captain's Duty. ") Accepting the honor, Ray kissed his new statuette and said: "There are a lot of wonderful writers in this room tonight. And on this night my wish for each of you is that once, just once, you can know what it feels like to have the kind of luck that I had on this movie.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | Jeffrey Fleishman
An untethered astronaut, a sexy hustler, a rich woman stripped of possessions and the persnickety creator of Mary Poppins are among the roles in which their creators earned nominations in the Golden Globes lead actress categories in drama and musical or comedy.    The drama nominees are Cate Blanchett as a neurotic socialite falling from grace in “Blue Jasmine”; Sandra Bullock as an astronaut floating helplessly in space in “Gravity”; Judi Dench as an Irish mother searching for the child she was forced to give up for adoption in “Philomena”; Emma Thompson as the creator of Mary Poppins who negotiates a movie deal with Walt Disney in “Saving Mr. Banks”; and Kate Winslet as an emotionally delicate single mother who falls in love with an escaped convict in “Labor Day.” Nominees in a comedy or musical are Meryl Streep, playing a belligerent, pill-popping mother with cancer in ”August: Osage County”; Amy Adams as a sexy grifter in “American Hustle”;  Julia Louis-Dreyfus as a single mother navigating mid-life tumult in “Enough Said”; Julie Delpy as a wife talking through the trials and tribulations of marriage in “Before Midnight”; and Greta Gerwig, playing a feckless woman sabotaging her life at every turn in “Frances Ha.” BALLOT: Cast your Golden Globe Awards vote Delpy's nomination recognizes her evolving Celine in "Before Midnight," the latest of three films -- after "Before Sunrise" (1995)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The 10 films nominated for this year's Academy Awards for original screenplay and adapted screenplay tell diverse and distinctive stories: those of a couple squabbling on a Greek vacation, an Irish mother searching for the child she was forced to give up, a Texas electrician turned AIDS activist, and a con artist compelled to work with the FBI on a corruption sting, to name a few. But a common thread emerged among many of the screenwriters in...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams
Five years ago, Julie Delpy wrote, directed and starred in the amiably shaggy romantic comedy "2 Days in Paris," in which she and Adam Goldberg's young lovers went to France for a visit. Although the movie gods were not exactly crying out for a sequel, superfluousness is one of the virtues of the new follow-up, "2 Days in New York," a giddy and largely consequence-free romp that sends a group of out-of-place Frenchmen and woman into the maelstrom of Manhattan. Delpy's harried artist Marion is now raising the child she had with her ex-boyfriend (Goldberg's "Paris" character)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 1992 | LOUIS CHUNOVIC
French actress Julie Delpy may look like an angel, but what makes her appealing on screen, she suspects, is the monster inside. No less an authority than French New Wave director Jean-Luc Goddard, in fact, pronounced the flaxen-haired, porcelain-skinned actress to be a "little monster" when he cast her in her first film at the age of 14. "I can be sweet, but my real personality is the opposite," she explains in a syllabic French lilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
Looking at the movies opening in late summer and early fall, it would be easy to assume these are go-go days for women in cinema. Actress Zoe Kazan not only stars in the romantic comedy "Ruby Sparks," she also wrote the screenplay. Likewise, Rashida Jones co-scripted her latest starring vehicle, "Celeste and Jesse Forever," with Will McCormack. Opening in Los Angeles on Friday is Julie Delpy's "2 Days in New York," a follow-up to her 2007 romantic comedy "2 Days in Paris"; Delpy wrote and directed both movies, poignant looks at the day-to-day complications of falling (and staying)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
"2 Days in Paris" is pure Julie Delpy, figuratively and otherwise. Since first becoming known to American audiences in the early '90s, she's revealed herself to be an artist of sundry and unexpected talents, with a distinctive voice and point of view. Most of these are on display in her first feature-length movie, which she wrote, directed, produced, edited, scored and stars in, opposite Adam Goldberg. She cast her real-life parents, Marie Pillet and Albert Delpy, as her parents in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2007 | Gregg LaGambina, Special to The Times
POOLSIDE, in a private cabana, wearing big, dark glasses and a sundress, Julie Delpy is talking. Her French accent, the bright white patio and the blue, rippling pool water conspire to provide an illusory Mediterranean mood to what is actually just a hotel in Westwood. As well-groomed bathers and wait staff float by on the mild air, Delpy leans in and begins railing against the evils of jealousy. "Jealousy is always negative," she says. "To be with someone jealous is the worst thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was a risk for director Richard Linklater to go so dark in "Before Midnight," the latest round of the romantic musings he began with his stars, Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke, nearly 20 years ago. The illusions of a more pristine love in "Before Sunrise" have been shelved so that the tipping point in a relationship can be laid bare. A devastating fight is the centerpiece now, the teasing flirtations a distant memory. Though the gauzy beauty of the earlier films remains, as does a sun-drenched European setting, this time Greece, what you will remember, what you will feel compelled to talk about long after, is the fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | Jeffrey Fleishman
An untethered astronaut, a sexy hustler, a rich woman stripped of possessions and the persnickety creator of Mary Poppins are among the roles in which their creators earned nominations in the Golden Globes lead actress categories in drama and musical or comedy.    The drama nominees are Cate Blanchett as a neurotic socialite falling from grace in “Blue Jasmine”; Sandra Bullock as an astronaut floating helplessly in space in “Gravity”; Judi Dench as an Irish mother searching for the child she was forced to give up for adoption in “Philomena”; Emma Thompson as the creator of Mary Poppins who negotiates a movie deal with Walt Disney in “Saving Mr. Banks”; and Kate Winslet as an emotionally delicate single mother who falls in love with an escaped convict in “Labor Day.” Nominees in a comedy or musical are Meryl Streep, playing a belligerent, pill-popping mother with cancer in ”August: Osage County”; Amy Adams as a sexy grifter in “American Hustle”;  Julia Louis-Dreyfus as a single mother navigating mid-life tumult in “Enough Said”; Julie Delpy as a wife talking through the trials and tribulations of marriage in “Before Midnight”; and Greta Gerwig, playing a feckless woman sabotaging her life at every turn in “Frances Ha.” BALLOT: Cast your Golden Globe Awards vote Delpy's nomination recognizes her evolving Celine in "Before Midnight," the latest of three films -- after "Before Sunrise" (1995)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
When the nominations for the Spirit Awards came out Tuesday morning, nominees were mostly busy with other things. Shane Carruth, nominated for director and editing for “Upstream Color,” was in line at LAX. Michael B. Jordan, nominated for male lead for “Fruitvale Station,” was in the shower at his family's home in Newark, N.J. In all, 45 films were nominated, from considered Oscar contenders such as “12 Years a Slave” and “Nebraska” to...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was a risk for director Richard Linklater to go so dark in "Before Midnight," the latest round of the romantic musings he began with his stars, Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke, nearly 20 years ago. The illusions of a more pristine love in "Before Sunrise" have been shelved so that the tipping point in a relationship can be laid bare. A devastating fight is the centerpiece now, the teasing flirtations a distant memory. Though the gauzy beauty of the earlier films remains, as does a sun-drenched European setting, this time Greece, what you will remember, what you will feel compelled to talk about long after, is the fight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - "Before Midnight," Richard Linklater's third film about the relationship between an American man (Ethan Hawke) and French woman (Julie Delpy), closes with what might be the series' piece de resistance : a 30-minute hotel-room argument between the couple. Brutal and witty, the power dynamic shifts back and forth between the pair, as one grabs the upper hand and the other snatches it back. The scene is so credible that at least one woman who'd seen the movie walked up to Linklater recently and told him she had begun to use some of the lines when she came to a disagreement with her husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Susan King
Film Independent at LACMA is holding a 1980s costume contest after the 30th anniversary screening of Martha Coolidge's endearing comedy "Valley Girl" on Thursday evening at the Leo S. Bing Theater. The romantic comedy was inspired by Frank Zappa and his daughter Moon Unit's 1982 hit song spoofing the stereotypical "Valley Girl" who lived in bedroom communities in the San Fernando Valley in the early 1980s. The film made a star out of a young Nicolas Cage as Randy, a young punk who falls for Valley Girl Julie (Deborah Foreman)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
It's rare for a talky, character-driven drama to be given one sequel, let alone two. Yet with "Before Midnight" - Richard Linklater's reprisal of characters he first made famous 18 years ago in "Before Sunrise" - the director has done just that. The film, which opens May 24, returns us to the lovelorn Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy). This time, the pair - he darkly comic, she earnest and idealistic - aren't meeting by chance but are vacationing on a Greek island, having gotten together nearly a decade ago. Now in their 40s and a little wiser for it, they're living together in Paris and raising twin daughters - a turn that resolves the question about their collective fate posed at the end of the second film, "Before Sunset," all the way back in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1995 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Meeting French actress Julie Delpy at a Hollywood restaurant to discuss her new film, "Before Sunrise," one opens the conversation with a question about the high premium Western culture places on physical beauty. "Oh, but I'm not beautiful. No, I don't think so--in fact, I can look really ugly. You wanna see?" she asks hopefully, then proceeds to contort her face into a gruesome expression. "That's really ugly, isn't it?" she says laughing. "I love to pull faces."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
A threequel for a scripted independent film is an anomaly. A threequel for a movie whose original premiered 18 years before is almost unheard of. Yet "Before Midnight," Richard Linklater's return to the romantic and other life travails of Julie Delpy's Celine and Ethan Hawke's Jesse is exactly that. And judging by its debut screening Sunday night at the Sundance Film Festival, the franchise has only gotten better with age. "I guess we're all...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams
Five years ago, Julie Delpy wrote, directed and starred in the amiably shaggy romantic comedy "2 Days in Paris," in which she and Adam Goldberg's young lovers went to France for a visit. Although the movie gods were not exactly crying out for a sequel, superfluousness is one of the virtues of the new follow-up, "2 Days in New York," a giddy and largely consequence-free romp that sends a group of out-of-place Frenchmen and woman into the maelstrom of Manhattan. Delpy's harried artist Marion is now raising the child she had with her ex-boyfriend (Goldberg's "Paris" character)
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