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Julie Eizenberg

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MAGAZINE
June 19, 1994
I know I speak for many in the architectural community in saying that we need more articles like "L.A. Architects: They Did It Their Way" (by Joseph Giovannini, Style, May 15). It is vital for the continued health of the profession that L.A.'s contributions and leadership in architecture be recognized throughout the world. JEFFREY DANIELS AIA Los Angeles Those bizarre designs are very appropriate for Los Angeles. They look as though they have already been wrecked by an earthquake.
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MAGAZINE
June 19, 1994
I know I speak for many in the architectural community in saying that we need more articles like "L.A. Architects: They Did It Their Way" (by Joseph Giovannini, Style, May 15). It is vital for the continued health of the profession that L.A.'s contributions and leadership in architecture be recognized throughout the world. JEFFREY DANIELS AIA Los Angeles Those bizarre designs are very appropriate for Los Angeles. They look as though they have already been wrecked by an earthquake.
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NEWS
April 10, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a land of architectural stars, it was evident that Richard Neutra was a superstar long before many of L.A.'s well-known types were out of diapers. Considered by many to be the city's greatest modernist, Neutra, who died in 1970 at age 78, was toasted on the occasion of what would have been his 100th birthday Wednesday night.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Learn more about sustainable design and green living as Altbuild, the Alternative Building Materials & Design Conference and Expo, opens Friday at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium.  Architects, builders and landscape designers will be among the more than 150 exhibitors on hand to discuss green design, including modular housing, rammed earth building, solar power and water conservation. Among this year's highlights: Larry Santoyo of the permaculture design company EarthFlow will answer questions about sustainable landscaping, composting and raising chickens.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 1989 | MICHAEL WEBB, Michael Webb writes on architecture and design.
INNOVATIVE ARCHITECTURE ALWAYS provokes dissent. Leading Parisians hated the Eiffel Tower when it was new, and critics panned the first designs for Rockefeller Center. So it was no surprise that the neighbors were up in arms when two young Australian architects-- Hank Koning and Julie Eizenberg--proposed a pair of stark towers for a picture-perfect street in the Hollywood Hills.
MAGAZINE
April 3, 1988 | ROCHELLE REED, Rochelle Reed is consulting editor of this magazine
HE'S AN attorney, she's an opera singer. Without a doubt, the style image usually suggested by these two professions is far more conservative than the decidedly hip renovation undertaken recently on this couple's unpretentious, '30s-era stucco bungalow.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 1997 | Aaron Betsky
Tucked away on a quiet street in Santa Monica, a bright red addition peeks out from behind this modest 1929 Spanish bungalow, signaling not only the home of artists Elena Mary Siff and Sam Erenberg but their work and display space as well. Designed by Hank Koning and Julie Eizenberg, who live up the street, the hybrid residence has prompted its share of double takes. Says Eizenberg: "It makes you see the normal elements of a house--the windows, the roof, the walls--in a new way.'
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2005 | Veronique de Turenne, Special to The Times
Stucco. It's one of the oldest construction materials we know, one of the easiest ways to cover a building, used on everything from chi-chi mansions to rude mud huts and yet -- stucco. Just the sound of it. Root word: stuck. Rhymes with yucko. Rhythmically similar to uh-oh. Where's the respect? Everywhere, if you know where to look. Revered modern architects Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra and Frank Gehry used stucco on some of their most famous houses.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | AARON BETSKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's hard to make civic buildings these days. Our courthouses, city halls and even halls of records used to be imposing edifices that spoke of the community's pride in its government. These days, we just want the cheapest possible box to house the bureaucracies that are the reality of government.
OPINION
February 20, 2000
Koning Eizenberg designed Pluralistic School 1, an elementary school in Santa Monica, and a community center for West Hollywood, which is under construction. If architecture expresses how a society sees itself, it is shocking to see what we accept as appropriate environments for high-school students. Whether in modern or classical skin, most schools are institutional dinosaurs whose image and organization speak of uniformity, not vision and potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
There is an uneasy territory between building and architecture, where the need for ready-made solutions to common problems intersects with the desire to create something of aesthetic and social substance. The work of Koning Eizenberg Architects has long hovered somewhere between the two.
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