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Julie Foudy

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1999 | JERRY CROWE
The co-captain of the Olympic champion U.S. women's soccer team, which faces Nigeria tonight in Chicago in the FIFA Women's World Cup. The championship game is July 10 at the Rose Bowl. Sugar and Spice: A free weekend at home in Laguna Niguel is a rarity for us, so when we're in town on a Friday night, my husband [golf pro Ian Sawyers] and I like to go out for dinner at Royal Thai Cuisine or Natraj, an Indian place, in Laguna Beach. I love spicy food and curries.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2011 | By Grahame L. Jones
It was 1991 and Mia Hamm was only 19, the baby of the group. Julie Foudy and Kristine Lilly weren't much older, each of them only 20. They were the stars of the future. But by the time the final whistle sounded on a cool and overcast day in Guangzhou, China, all those many years ago, the three players and their 15 teammates were on top of the world. The final score on that memorable afternoon at Tianhe Stadium was U.S. 2, Norway 1. Soccer's first Women's World Cup, China '91, saw the Americans prevail, and the party that night at the White Swan Hotel lasted well into the early morning hours.
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SPORTS
June 25, 1991 | MARTIN BECK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It doesn't happen often, so Julie Foudy is using her spare month to catch up with friends, log some serious beach time and otherwise enjoy a Southern California summer. Time to herself is a rare pleasure for Foudy, who spent all but seven days last summer either preparing for the fall soccer season at Stanford or traveling with the U.S. national women's soccer team. Foudy's current respite comes after a hectic few months.
SPORTS
November 27, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Now that the United States has overcome the discomfiting situation of needing to win a playoff series to qualify for the 2011 women's World Cup, the question is whether getting into such a predicament was a one-time fluke or part of an emerging pattern. The U.S. earned the final spot in the 16-team World Cup field with two 1-0 victories in the aggregate-goals playoff with Italy, adding Saturday's victory at Toyota Park to the one Nov. 20 in Padua, Italy. For the country that had dominated women's soccer since winning the inaugural World Cup in 1991, just being in danger of not making the sixth World Cup next summer in Germany may be the jolt needed to keep the U.S. program among the world leaders.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Foudy was 6 years old when two boys in her first grade class at Del Cerro Elementary in Mission Viejo asked her to come outside and play soccer at recess. Joy Fawcett was about the same age when the boys and girls in her Huntington Beach neighborhood asked her to join their games. Neither had any thoughts about finding a club team that would offer the most exposure to college recruiters.
SPORTS
April 18, 1998 | LINDA WHITMORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Julie Foudy is home in Laguna Niguel, she says she feels as if she's only visiting. "Probably since I was 16, I've spent most of my life out of the country, or at least on the road," said Foudy, co-captain of the U.S. National Women's Soccer Team. "That's really all I know.' And because of that, and because of the success of her team, she is known around the world. On her way to the International Tournament in China this year, Foudy stopped by Paris to receive FIFA's Fair Play Award.
SPORTS
November 27, 2010 | By Philip Hersh
Now that the United States has overcome the discomfiting situation of needing to win a playoff series to qualify for the 2011 women's World Cup, the question is whether getting into such a predicament was a one-time fluke or part of an emerging pattern. The U.S. earned the final spot in the 16-team World Cup field with two 1-0 victories in the aggregate-goals playoff with Italy, adding Saturday's victory at Toyota Park to the one Nov. 20 in Padua, Italy. For the country that had dominated women's soccer since winning the inaugural World Cup in 1991, just being in danger of not making the sixth World Cup next summer in Germany may be the jolt needed to keep the U.S. program among the world leaders.
SPORTS
February 2, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
Wendy Williams, Olympic diver, crumbled to a heap in front of her refrigerator, sobbing because it was too hard to decide what to have for lunch. That was the day Williams' life was saved. She was depressed, had been for years, all during the time she was winning national championships and an Olympic bronze medal. She wasn't alone, although she didn't know it then.
SPORTS
July 7, 2002 | Associated Press
Julie Foudy scored on a penalty kick in second-half injury time to lift the San Diego Spirit past the Boston Breakers, 5-4, before 6,149 Saturday in the highest-scoring game in Women's United Soccer Assn. The previous single-game scoring record was seven, accomplished three times in the league's two-year history. Foudy put the penalty kick past goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc for her second goal of the game and third of the season.
SPORTS
June 28, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
Tisha Venturini's incredible double somersault--complete with Ozzie Smith-style no-hands backflip--after scoring her second goal against North Korea on Sunday night was, believe it or not, a premeditated act. According to U.S. teammate Shannon MacMillan, the two players were plotting elaborate goal celebrations all day after getting the good news they would be starting. MacMillan recreated the conversation thusly: MacMillan: "I think I'm going to go over the boards and into the crowd."
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
They have done everything else together -- traveled the globe, won world championships and Olympic gold medals, founded a women's professional soccer league -- so it was only fitting Tuesday that Mia Hamm and Julie Foudy together were elected to the U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame. The two became the sixth and seventh women to be so honored, following in the footsteps of their 1991 Women's World Cup-winning teammates April Heinrichs, Carin Gabarra, Shannon Higgins, Michelle Akers and Carla Overbeck.
SPORTS
December 9, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
The rain ended, the skies cleared and the stars came out -- three of them for the last time. At 9:50 on Wednesday night, Mia Hamm stepped off the soccer field and into the history books. The United States-Mexico match had nine minutes to go when Heather O'Reilly, one of the stars of tomorrow, took over from Hamm. "She's the future," a tearful Hamm said after it was all over.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones
Chances are, Julie Foudy will be playing Thursday night when the United States faces Brazil in the gold medal game in women's soccer. Foudy, who injured her right foot during Monday night's 2-1 overtime victory over Germany in the semifinals, was still on crutches Tuesday, but X-rays showed no bones had been broken when she was stepped on by German forward Isabel Bachor. The U.S. captain was sidelined for a couple of minutes, then came back into the game, but she was unable to continue.
SPORTS
August 23, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
It won't end here, not on this sun-baked island of Crete, not today, not against Germany. The journey that Joy Fawcett, Julie Foudy and Mia Hamm began all those many years ago still has miles to run. The trio will retire after the Olympics, and might well be joined by Brandi Chastain and Kristine Lilly, but this is not where it ends.
SPORTS
October 4, 2003 | Randy Harvey
After the U.S. women's soccer team finished its workout Friday on the Ronaldo Field at Nike's headquarters, Julie Foudy sat in the chair behind one of the swoosh-embossed nets and said she had a stressful experience to relate. You wondered if it was about something that happened in the 1-0 Women's World Cup quarterfinal victory over Norway. Or maybe it was about Germany, the United States' opponent in Sunday's semifinal at PGE Park.
SPORTS
July 7, 2002 | Associated Press
Julie Foudy scored on a penalty kick in second-half injury time to lift the San Diego Spirit past the Boston Breakers, 5-4, before 6,149 Saturday in the highest-scoring game in Women's United Soccer Assn. The previous single-game scoring record was seven, accomplished three times in the league's two-year history. Foudy put the penalty kick past goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc for her second goal of the game and third of the season.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | Grahame L. Jones
Chances are, Julie Foudy will be playing Thursday night when the United States faces Brazil in the gold medal game in women's soccer. Foudy, who injured her right foot during Monday night's 2-1 overtime victory over Germany in the semifinals, was still on crutches Tuesday, but X-rays showed no bones had been broken when she was stepped on by German forward Isabel Bachor. The U.S. captain was sidelined for a couple of minutes, then came back into the game, but she was unable to continue.
SPORTS
April 1, 1987 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
Almost anyone who watches midfielder Julie Foudy play soccer for a while will soon agree that instinct is what sets her apart. She dribbles, traps and passes as well--if not better--than anyone around. But beyond that, she seems to know what to do with the ball, when and where her teammates are, where they're going, and just what plans the defenders might be laying.
SPORTS
February 2, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
Wendy Williams, Olympic diver, crumbled to a heap in front of her refrigerator, sobbing because it was too hard to decide what to have for lunch. That was the day Williams' life was saved. She was depressed, had been for years, all during the time she was winning national championships and an Olympic bronze medal. She wasn't alone, although she didn't know it then.
SPORTS
December 9, 1999 | DIANE PUCIN
There has been an honorary cereal. A hearty bowl of U.S. Soccer's Golden Goals by Quaker Oats, anyone? And don't bite down too hard on one of those Golden Goals! There have been magazine covers and there are books being written. There are enough speaking engagements and ribbon-cuttings, dinner invitations and autograph sessions available, says Tisha Venturini, to keep every woman who has ever worn a U.S. national soccer team jersey busy 24/7.
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