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Julie Harris

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Julie Harris wasn't simply one of the great American actors of the 20th century. She represented to those in her profession a reverential ideal. Harris died Saturday at 87 at her home in Chatham, Mass., far away from the bright lights of Broadway. Yet Broadway will never forget her. She was both the embodiment and essence of theatrical excellence -- flesh and spirit, as always with Harris' acting, made one. Her obituaries will tell you that she holds the record as a performer for the most Tony Awards (six, including a special lifetime achievement award)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By David Ng
Julie Harris, who died Saturday at 87, was often described as a Broadway legend, having received a total of six Tony Awards during her career. But like many stage actresses of her generation, Harris frequently toured and spent a lot of time performing in theaters far away from New York. Her itinerant theater career often took her to Southern California, where she performed in several stage productions over the years when she wasn't otherwise busy working in film or television. In an interview with The Times in 1959, she said she didn't believe "the theater in this country is just New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1987 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Julie Harris will offer her portrayal of reclusive poet Emily Dickinson during a pair of benefit performances of "The Belle of Amherst" this weekend at the Laguna Moulton Playhouse. The Saturday and Sunday shows will help raise money for the playhouse's building fund, which is trying to secure $1 million to finish a 5,000-square-foot rehearsal hall. Another $1 million is needed for the playhouse's operating endowment, said Karyn Rohrer, the theater's development director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Julie Harris wasn't simply one of the great American actors of the 20th century. She represented to those in her profession a reverential ideal. Harris died Saturday at 87 at her home in Chatham, Mass., far away from the bright lights of Broadway. Yet Broadway will never forget her. She was both the embodiment and essence of theatrical excellence -- flesh and spirit, as always with Harris' acting, made one. Her obituaries will tell you that she holds the record as a performer for the most Tony Awards (six, including a special lifetime achievement award)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Standing in the well-manicured garden of her rented house in Pacific Palisades, sunlight dancing on her burnished, close-cropped hair, Julie Harris marvels at the bounty of figs she has just harvested. "Isn't this wonderful? " she says in amazement. Thirty-five years after she dazzled Broadway as the restless Frankie Addams in "The Member of the Wedding," an astonished child-heart still beats in the actress.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
It's not very often that we get to see Julie Harris live on stage. She's one of the few performers whose combination of clarity, delicacy and perfect emotional pitch cuts through the theatrical air and thereby defines for us just what it is that makes the theater special. (She's a regular on TV's "Knots Landing," but she's not immune to the way television tends to laminate performance.
NEWS
April 21, 1987 | ELLEN APPEL
When Julie Harris plays "The Belle of Amherst," her fans head for the theater, no matter the distance. At her special benefit performance at the Laguna Moulton Playhouse Saturday night, the play's author, Bill Luce, ventured to Laguna Beach from his home in Yosemite. He said he wouldn't miss seeing Harris in her Tony award-winning role as Emily Dickinson. At an Amherst College reunion in Massachusetts, Dick Billings of Laguna Beach had invited all his classmates to the performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
The sunlit hotel apartment on top of Nob Hill had large windows and a view of the Bay. Great clouds were swirling in the skies. The rain had stopped for a day and Julie Harris was walking around the casual disorder of the room: A welter of paper, books, clippings and mailing supplies covered a table, a dresser and at least two chairs. The encampment of an actress on tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
What becomes a legend most? In the case of Julie Harris, one of the leading ladies of the American theater, the answer may well be other legends. Winner of an unprecedented five Tony Awards, the famously petite actress has assayed a wide range of roles in theater, film and television, in a career that spans six decades and is still going strong. Yet she's also made a specialty of portraying historical women. Harris has taken on the roles of Mary Todd Lincoln, Isak Dinesen, St.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Famously petite Julie Harris, one of the leading ladies of American theater, stands near a microphone in the basement recording studio of KCRW radio in Santa Monica. She is dressed in a tweedy brown jacket, with red glasses framing blue eyes that peer out from beneath a silver-blond pageboy. The look is gentle yet businesslike. But when she begins to speak, the voice of the dream-bound Amanda Wingfield, the mother in "The Glass Menagerie," pours forth in a Southern-tinged aria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Julie Harris, the delicate yet steely grande dame of the stage whose performances earned her a record five Tony Awards and 10 Tony nominations, died Saturday. She was 87. Harris died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Mass., actress Francesca James, a close friend, told the Associated Press. Harris had suffered a stroke in 2001 and another in 2010, James said. In addition to her theatrical awards, Harris was nominated for an Academy Award in 1952 for her indelible performance as Frankie Addams in Carson McCullers' "The Member of the Wedding," a role she had created on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The UCLA Film & Television Archive's Festival of Preservation turns its spotlight on the small screen with a tribute Saturday to the television work of an award-winning actress and a celebration March 23 of an acclaimed but short-lived ABC anthology series. Julie Harris has won five Tony Awards and is best known to film fans for her role as James Dean's character's love interest in 1955's "East of Eden. " During the 1950s, she was one of the superstars of live drama anthologies. One of her earliest TV appearances, in the1951 Goodyear Television Playhouse "October Story," screens Saturday afternoon at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
"There's everybody else, and then there's Julie Harris." With those words, actor Charles Durning launched a tribute to the actress that had guests at the benefit for Laguna Playhouse tearing up even as they giddily cheered the five-time Tony Award winner. "No one talks less but knows more about acting," he added. Her skill is like "light ... the way moonlight exists. It's out there, all right, but distant, unreachable for most of us. The rest of us steal, but not her.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001 | SHAUNA SNOW
Julie Harris in Serious Condition Actress Julie Harris, 75, was in serious but stable condition at a Chicago-area hospital Wednesday after being found semiconscious in her apartment over the weekend. The hospital declined to give details about Harris' illness but did say it "is not life-threatening." Harris, who was performing in a production at Chicago's Victory Gardens Theater, was found by theater staff members after she failed to show up for Saturday's performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
What becomes a legend most? In the case of Julie Harris, one of the leading ladies of the American theater, the answer may well be other legends. Winner of an unprecedented five Tony Awards, the famously petite actress has assayed a wide range of roles in theater, film and television, in a career that spans six decades and is still going strong. Yet she's also made a specialty of portraying historical women. Harris has taken on the roles of Mary Todd Lincoln, Isak Dinesen, St.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1999
Julie Harris and the late Richard Kiley host a poignant, poetic look at the aging process, "Grow Old Along With Me," Tuesday on KCET.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwright Peter Shaffer loves a good fight. In "Equus," he pitted madness (the horse-blinding boy) against reason (the psychiatrist). In "Amadeus," genius (Mozart) battled mediocrity (Salieri). And in "Lettice & Lovage," at the San Diego Civic Theatre through Sunday, Imagination squares off against Truth. If this last seems the slightest of these struggles--it is.
SPORTS
April 17, 1996
Julie Harris SCHOOL: Canyon SPORT: Track and field YEAR: Junior SEASON AT A GLANCE: After leading the Cowboys to their first state Division I cross-country title in November, Harris has established bests in the 800 (2 minutes 21.8 seconds), 1,600 (5:15.5) and 3,200 meters (10:58.95) in track. WEEK AT A GLANCE: Harris posted a best of 10:58.95 in the 3,200 on Saturday to place fourth in the Arcadia Invitational. The time set a school record, held previously by Robin Heidt, who clocked 11:02.
SPORTS
March 31, 1996 | DARIN ESPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Junior Julie Harris and freshman Lauren Fleshman of Canyon High had lower expectations than did their coach coming into Saturday's Pasadena Games at Occidental College. Never mind that the pair led the Cowboys to the 1995 state Division I cross-country championship, Harris and Fleshman expected to finish third and fourth in the girls' 3,200 meters. Especially once they discovered a late entrant in the race, Andrea Neipp of Highland.
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