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Julie Julia

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FOOD
August 12, 2009 | RUSS PARSONS
At a certain point in the wonderful new movie "Julie & Julia," there is a plot twist so shocking the audience gasps. Julia Child does something that seems so totally out of character that even on the way out, people were still shaking their heads. "How could she?" Well, that's one mystery I can solve. I was right there in the middle of it. Before I go any further, I have to warn you that this column is as full of spoilers as an unplugged refrigerator in August. If you haven't already seen the movie, you might want to wait to read this until after you have.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Nora Ephron had many passions, most publicly her writing and filmmaking. But the author, screenwriter and director, who died Tuesday at age 71, also had great enthusiasm in her largely private work in her Manhattan kitchen. And she left behind a self-published cookbook, by turns droll and earnest, memorializing the zeal. "Julie & Julia," Ephron's last film, focused on the life of chef Julia Child, and in some ways reflected the filmmaker's own love of food preparation. "The truth is that most marriages have food as a major player in them, and certainly mine does," she said in an interview with The Times before the film's 2009 release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey
This perfectly puffed soufflé of a film, starring Meryl Streep as Julia Child and Amy Adams as the blogger who cooks through "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" and lives-loves to tell the tale, is about as tasty a delight as any major studio has served up this summer. In a world where even fast food joints are forced to display their calories, it's great fun to be sauteed in butter and wine for a couple of hours absolutely guilt free. Streep fills out the towering, gangly cooking phenom quite remarkably; she's larger than life and yet completely embraceable.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
A funny thing happened whenever I set out to see Meryl Streep in “The Iron Lady.” I'd invite one of my moviegoing pals to join me and then find myself later that evening at “Shame,” “My Week With Marilyn” or the glorious “Pina.” The reviews for “The Iron Lady” weren't all that glowing, but Streep came in for her usual chorus of hosannas. For some reason, this wasn't proving to be much of a lure. Even after the Oscar nominations came out, with two-time winner Streep making history with her 17th nomination, “The Iron Lady” was still a no-go with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2009
A certain amount of Republican bashing is de rigueur for Hollywood films, but Nora Ephron's "Julie & Julia" reaches a new low. From scenes depicting the Child sisters groaning about their Republican father to Julia Child's husband being sent back to Washington for a McCarthyite interrogation, we then get the final howler of Julie and her boss. Julie, the alter ego of Julia, calls in sick with the stomach flu and her boss reminds her that if he were a Republican, she'd be fired! Caution, Republicans!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2010
SERIES 48 Hours Mystery: This real-life crime series follows up on a case where a teenager's mother was killed a year after the teen's father (10 p.m. CBS). Saturday Night Live: Tina Fey hosts, with musical guest Justin Bieber (11:29 p.m. NBC). MOVIES Who Is Clark Rockefeller? A German con artist (Eric McCormack) poses as a member of the Rockefeller family in this 2010 TV drama. Sherry Stringfield also stars (7 p.m. Lifetime). Bedtime Stories: Adam Sandler plays a motel's jack-of-all-trades who entertains his niece and nephew with fanciful stories -- which start coming true.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu and Jerry Hirsch
Celebrated TV chef Julia Child served retailers a healthy helping of business this weekend as moviegoers rushed to snatch up cookbooks, buy biographies and even sign up for French cooking classes. The surprise surge came as the Meryl Streep film "Julie & Julia," based in part on her life, opened in theaters over the weekend. It ranked No. 2 at the box office in the U.S. and Canada and pulled in $20 million. By Sunday, Pasadena bookstore Vroman's sold out of the first volume of "Mastering the Art of French Cooking."
NEWS
July 27, 2009
Nora Ephron: An article in Sunday's Calendar section about writer-director Nora Ephron and her new film "Julie & Julia" incorrectly stated that she was a graduate of Wesleyan. Ephron graduated from Wellesley College.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
A funny thing happened whenever I set out to see Meryl Streep in “The Iron Lady.” I'd invite one of my moviegoing pals to join me and then find myself later that evening at “Shame,” “My Week With Marilyn” or the glorious “Pina.” The reviews for “The Iron Lady” weren't all that glowing, but Streep came in for her usual chorus of hosannas. For some reason, this wasn't proving to be much of a lure. Even after the Oscar nominations came out, with two-time winner Streep making history with her 17th nomination, “The Iron Lady” was still a no-go with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Actor Stanley Tucci is a stealth-bombing mischief-maker, an eye-twinkling scene-stealer. Often flying under the radar, he is precision in action and deadly ? or deadly funny if that's the mission ? when you least expect it. At the moment, he's the best thing about the disappointing bump and grind of "Burlesque," but then he's made a habit of being really good in really bad movies. Fortunately, he's also made a habit of being terrific in the great ones, a quality that Hollywood hasn't, in my mind, appreciated nearly enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times Food Editor
"As Always, Julia: The Letters of Julia Child and Avis DeVoto" Joan Reardon Houghton-Mifflin: 416 pp., $26 In 1952, a middle-aged American woman living in Paris responded to a complaint about the poor quality of American-made kitchen knives by one of her favorite magazine writers and sent him a couple of French-made ones from her neighborhood store. If you believe history turns on specific moments, you could say that impulsive act of generosity was the start of the American culinary revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Randee Dawn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sometimes the next big thing comes in a small package. A 140-character package, to be precise, in the case of Justin Halpern. Just less than a year ago, Halpern sent out his first tweet about the harsh, often unintentionally funny, things his father said to him. A key re-tweet later (thanks to comedian Rob Corddry), the 29-year-old writer — whose biggest deal to that point had been developing a spec show for Comedy Central — was hearing from Chris von Goetz, head of the television literary department at ICM. Goetz connected Halpern and his writing partner, Patrick Schumacker, with Max Mutchnick and David Kohan of "Will and Grace" fame, and this fall, "$# !
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2010
SERIES 48 Hours Mystery: This real-life crime series follows up on a case where a teenager's mother was killed a year after the teen's father (10 p.m. CBS). Saturday Night Live: Tina Fey hosts, with musical guest Justin Bieber (11:29 p.m. NBC). MOVIES Who Is Clark Rockefeller? A German con artist (Eric McCormack) poses as a member of the Rockefeller family in this 2010 TV drama. Sherry Stringfield also stars (7 p.m. Lifetime). Bedtime Stories: Adam Sandler plays a motel's jack-of-all-trades who entertains his niece and nephew with fanciful stories -- which start coming true.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009
Fiction 1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson ($14.95) 2. The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery ($15) 3. Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout ($14) 4. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows ($14) 5. The Private Patient by P.D. James ($15) 6. The Piano Teacher by Janice Y. K. Lee ($15) 7. The Road by Cormac McCarthy ($14.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Noel Murray
Julie & Julia Sony, $28.96; Blu-ray, $39.95 The "Julia" half of Nora Ephron's comedy is absolute- ly wonderful, casting Meryl Streep as Julia Child and showing how the beloved TV chef developed an interest in French cooking (and a side interest in publishing). The "Julie" half stars Amy Adams as Julie Powell, a blogger who gained international attention for her attempt to cook every recipe in Child's "Mastering the Art of French Cooking." Ephron seems less enthused by Powell's story, perhaps because the young writer -- despite the best efforts of Adams -- comes off as weak-willed and self-absorbed, especially in contrast to the can-do Child.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2009 | By Mark Kennedy
Julie Powell's new book is not for the squeamish, in more ways than one. It opens with her in the back of a butcher shop, flecked with blood and reeking of meat. She's busy slicing a raw, slippery liver with a foot-long knife. By the end of the book, another internal organ -- her heart -- has been filleted: Powell dissects the pain caused by her two-year affair with an old college flame that sent her into an emotional tailspin and almost sank her marriage. It's all a bit, well, messy.
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