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Julie Kavner

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MAGAZINE
January 26, 1992 | MARGY ROCHLIN, Margy Rochlin is a contributing editor of this magazine
IT HAPPENED ONE DAY IN HOLLYWOOD, sometime after the five-year run of her hit series "Rhoda" had ended but before her string of prestige appearances in five Woody Allen movies, before her supporting role on "The Tracey Ullman Show," before that indelible voice of hers, creaking like a gate hinge in need of oiling, drifted out of Marge's cartoon lips on "The Simpsons."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
"The Simpsons" may be going strong in its 25th season, but a major character from the long-running animated series will soon meet his or her maker. In a conference call with reporters last week, executive producer Al Jean revealed plans to kill off a character in the season ahead. "We're actually working on a script where a character will pass away," Jean said. "I'll give a clue that the actor playing the character won an Emmy for playing that character, but I won't say who it is. " FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers "Simpsons" fanatics will know that this hint doesn't exactly narrow things down: Nearly every member of the core ensemble of voice-over performers has won an Emmy, including Dan Castellaneta (Homer, Barney, Krusty)
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NEWS
April 11, 1993 | Michael Wilmington
Nora Ephron, who makes her directorial debut with this very smart and likable 1992 release, shows us the world of talk-show TV, Las Vegas clubs, the glamorous, glitzy sites from the edges: the perspective of two young girls (Gaby Hoffmann, left, and Samantha Mathis) whose mother (Julie Kavner) zooms to success in stand-up comedy. Adapted by Ephron and her sister Delia from a Meg Wolitzer novel, the film manages to overcome a big flaw.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | Michael Wilmington
Nora Ephron, who makes her directorial debut with this very smart and likable 1992 release, shows us the world of talk-show TV, Las Vegas clubs, the glamorous, glitzy sites from the edges: the perspective of two young girls (Gaby Hoffmann, left, and Samantha Mathis) whose mother (Julie Kavner) zooms to success in stand-up comedy. Adapted by Ephron and her sister Delia from a Meg Wolitzer novel, the film manages to overcome a big flaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
"The Simpsons" may be going strong in its 25th season, but a major character from the long-running animated series will soon meet his or her maker. In a conference call with reporters last week, executive producer Al Jean revealed plans to kill off a character in the season ahead. "We're actually working on a script where a character will pass away," Jean said. "I'll give a clue that the actor playing the character won an Emmy for playing that character, but I won't say who it is. " FALL TV 2013: Watch the trailers "Simpsons" fanatics will know that this hint doesn't exactly narrow things down: Nearly every member of the core ensemble of voice-over performers has won an Emmy, including Dan Castellaneta (Homer, Barney, Krusty)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Valerie Harper was reminiscing about Julie Kavner and their work together as the Morgenstern sisters on "Rhoda" during the 1970s. She recalled the time a director had suggested covering some expository dialogue in the kitchen with something funny involving food. There was a pause. Then Kavner said slowly, in her distinctively raspy voice, "Valerie . . . Valerie, did you ever have a Sara Lee that wasn't all the way thawed?" "So we spent the whole time struggling with a chocolate cake that wasn't yet thawed," Harper remembered.
MAGAZINE
March 1, 1992
Although I was two grades below Julie Kavner in high school, I had Advanced Drama with her and remember her well ("The Prime of Ms. Julie Kavner," by Margy Rochlin, Jan. 26). She was quiet, down-to-earth and friendly. I vividly remember drama teacher John Ingle telling Kavner that she needed to do something about her voice if she ever wanted to be successful. Years later, it is this unique physical attribute, along with her talent and hard work, that has set her apart. GARY RAYMOND Thousand Oaks
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Out of the Shadows: Woody Allen's latest film, "Shadows and Fog," will premiere in Paris on Wednesday, the first time a film by the director will open internationally before its domestic release. The Orion Pictures comedy set in the 1920s opens in the United States on March 20. The Paris date was set before Orion suffered financial difficulties and had to delay the domestic release. Because European moviegoers are such big fans of the Woodman, the date was kept.
NEWS
June 11, 1995 | Peter Rainer
This James Brooks comedy was rapped when it came out in 1994 because all the musical numbers in it were scrapped, but it's still worth seeing. Nick Nolte plays a single dad struggling to balance his meager acting career with fatherhood. Albert Brooks and Julie Kavner (pictured) play unlikely lovebirds, and they're both marvelous.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | From Reuters
The actors who provide the voices for the cartoon characters on the long-running TV show "The Simpsons" have stopped work in a bid to force a settlement of lengthy contract renewal talks, Daily Variety reported Thursday. The Hollywood trade paper said Dan Castellaneta, Hank Azaria, Harry Shearer, Yeardley Smith, Julie Kavner and Nancy Cartwright have not shown up for two script readings in the past few weeks, holding up production on the hit satire's upcoming 16th season.
MAGAZINE
January 26, 1992 | MARGY ROCHLIN, Margy Rochlin is a contributing editor of this magazine
IT HAPPENED ONE DAY IN HOLLYWOOD, sometime after the five-year run of her hit series "Rhoda" had ended but before her string of prestige appearances in five Woody Allen movies, before her supporting role on "The Tracey Ullman Show," before that indelible voice of hers, creaking like a gate hinge in need of oiling, drifted out of Marge's cartoon lips on "The Simpsons."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Valerie Harper was reminiscing about Julie Kavner and their work together as the Morgenstern sisters on "Rhoda" during the 1970s. She recalled the time a director had suggested covering some expository dialogue in the kitchen with something funny involving food. There was a pause. Then Kavner said slowly, in her distinctively raspy voice, "Valerie . . . Valerie, did you ever have a Sara Lee that wasn't all the way thawed?" "So we spent the whole time struggling with a chocolate cake that wasn't yet thawed," Harper remembered.
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