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Julie Kelly

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Julie Kelly balances her time between singing and teaching. Given the uneven employment opportunities for the vast array of vocalists who have not achieved the visibility of Diana Krall or Jane Monheit, she generally teaches more than she performs. And that's unfortunate. Her performance at the Westin LAX Jazz Lobby on Thursday night was the work of a vocalist who deserves a wider hearing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Singer Julie Kelly balances her time between singing and teaching. Given the uneven employment opportunities for the vast array of vocalists who have not achieved the visibility of Diana Krall or Jane Monheit, she generally teaches more than she performs. And that's unfortunate. Her performance at the Westin LAX Jazz Lobby on Thursday night was the work of a vocalist who deserves a wider hearing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
You have to admire singer Julie Kelly for her willingness to take chances. Rather than just sing her songs according to the book, Kelly fussed with a lot of them Thursday night at Alfonse's in North Hollywood, offering horn-like stances. Sometimes she was able to walk this tightrope, sometimes she fell into the net. Happily, she mostly stayed on her feet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Julie Kelly, a classy jazz vocalist, is always seeking new material. A fresh song, even one from 50 years ago, gives her a burst of inspiration. Lately she's found some dandy old ones, and some with a contemporary flair too. Take "Into the Light," a modern blues tune written by ex-Art Blakey trumpeter Brian Lynch and outfitted with lyrics by Sunny Wilkinson, a former L.A.-based artist who now teaches at Western Michigan University.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Add voice to an instrumental combo and things can suddenly change. The brass immediately become hushed, accompaniment becomes more predictable and the drummer reaches for the brushes. A certain tentativeness permeates the proceedings. But it doesn't have to be that way, as Orange County-based keyboardist Peggy Duquesnel's quartet and singer Julie Kelly proved during the first set Tuesday at Cafe Lido.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Julie Kelly, a classy jazz vocalist, is always seeking new material. A fresh song, even one from 50 years ago, gives her a burst of inspiration. Lately she's found some dandy old ones, and some with a contemporary flair too. Take "Into the Light," a modern blues tune written by ex-Art Blakey trumpeter Brian Lynch and outfitted with lyrics by Sunny Wilkinson, a former L.A.-based artist who now teaches at Western Michigan University.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Until about two years ago, singer Julie Kelly kept at least one foot planted firmly on jazz-fusion turf, especially when her accompanists sometimes cranked the volume way up as they worked out on electronic gear. But then pianist Tom Garvin, known for his way with an acoustic piano and also his keen ability to back vocalists, showed up and changed everything. "He subbed for my regular keyboardist at a gig . . . and I said, 'This is it!'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Tasteful in her choice of tunes (by Dave Grusin, Chick Corea and Stevie Wonder et al.), and in her selection of musicians (piano and arrangements by Tom Garvin), Julie Kelly phrases intelligently and bears a resemblance to Anita O'Day that extends, unfortunately, to her uncertainty of intonation. The slow numbers ("Detour Ahead" and the title tune) come off best.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times
When she was a fledgling jazz vocalist in her early 20s, Julie Kelly moonlighted as a waitress at the famed San Francisco club the Jazz Workshop, and heard many of the greats: pianist Ahmad Jamal, bassist Charles Mingus, conga drummer Mongo Santamaria, and so many others. But it was blues tunes like "Goin' Down Slow" and "Ain't Nobody's Business," sung by Jimmy Witherspoon--that barrel-voiced, jazz-influenced baritone--that really floored her.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1995 | Bill Kohlhaase
SANDRA BOOKER "Very Early" Jersey Boy Music * * 1/2 JULIE KELLY "Stories to Tell" Chase Music Group * * 1/2 Los Angeles is blessed with its share of competent vocalists, but the trick is to find them among the overabundant supply of pretender and wanna-be singers who populate the area. These albums feature two of the city's most serious-minded practitioners of the art.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Fans of jazz singing will find no better place to satisfy their musical cravings than Ca Del Sole Ristorante in North Hollywood. The restaurant's intimate performance room programs singers seven nights a week (with an occasional instrumental evening thrown in for variety) featuring such talented local artists as Julie Kelly, Stephanie Haynes, Sandra Booker and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A few years ago, Julie Kelly devoted a lot of her time to performing. One of the top jazz singers in Los Angeles, the Studio City resident was often heard in Valley jazz rooms such as the now-defunct Le Cafe, and elsewhere. These days, Kelly has other pursuits that vie for her attention. Of course, her 12-year-old son, Anthony, is a primary focus, as is her husband, Sam DiMaggio. There are her private students, who number about a dozen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1995 | Bill Kohlhaase
SANDRA BOOKER "Very Early" Jersey Boy Music * * 1/2 JULIE KELLY "Stories to Tell" Chase Music Group * * 1/2 Los Angeles is blessed with its share of competent vocalists, but the trick is to find them among the overabundant supply of pretender and wanna-be singers who populate the area. These albums feature two of the city's most serious-minded practitioners of the art.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times
When she was a fledgling jazz vocalist in her early 20s, Julie Kelly moonlighted as a waitress at the famed San Francisco club the Jazz Workshop, and heard many of the greats: pianist Ahmad Jamal, bassist Charles Mingus, conga drummer Mongo Santamaria, and so many others. But it was blues tunes like "Goin' Down Slow" and "Ain't Nobody's Business," sung by Jimmy Witherspoon--that barrel-voiced, jazz-influenced baritone--that really floored her.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a common sight at most popular watering holes where people come to unwind after work. A pair of women, neatly dressed, come in and stake out a corner where they indulge in an animated exchange. Naturally, they get attention from other patrons, sometimes sharing small talk and a couple of laughs with those seated nearby. That's exactly what singer Julie Kelly and pianist Karen Hammack did Tuesday at Spaghettini, only this wasn't clock-out time for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Add voice to an instrumental combo and things can suddenly change. The brass immediately become hushed, accompaniment becomes more predictable and the drummer reaches for the brushes. A certain tentativeness permeates the proceedings. But it doesn't have to be that way, as Orange County-based keyboardist Peggy Duquesnel's quartet and singer Julie Kelly proved during the first set Tuesday at Cafe Lido.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Fans of jazz singing will find no better place to satisfy their musical cravings than Ca Del Sole Ristorante in North Hollywood. The restaurant's intimate performance room programs singers seven nights a week (with an occasional instrumental evening thrown in for variety) featuring such talented local artists as Julie Kelly, Stephanie Haynes, Sandra Booker and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a common sight at most popular watering holes where people come to unwind after work. A pair of women, neatly dressed, come in and stake out a corner where they indulge in an animated exchange. Naturally, they get attention from other patrons, sometimes sharing small talk and a couple of laughs with those seated nearby. That's exactly what singer Julie Kelly and pianist Karen Hammack did Tuesday at Spaghettini, only this wasn't clock-out time for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Tasteful in her choice of tunes (by Dave Grusin, Chick Corea and Stevie Wonder et al.), and in her selection of musicians (piano and arrangements by Tom Garvin), Julie Kelly phrases intelligently and bears a resemblance to Anita O'Day that extends, unfortunately, to her uncertainty of intonation. The slow numbers ("Detour Ahead" and the title tune) come off best.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
You have to admire singer Julie Kelly for her willingness to take chances. Rather than just sing her songs according to the book, Kelly fussed with a lot of them Thursday night at Alfonse's in North Hollywood, offering horn-like stances. Sometimes she was able to walk this tightrope, sometimes she fell into the net. Happily, she mostly stayed on her feet.
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