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Julie Marie Myatt

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt
Hollywood loves unlikely buddies: Oscar and Felix, Elliott and E.T., House and Wilson. But in Julie Marie Myatt's wry and affecting "The Happy Ones," now at South Coast Repertory, tragedy makes for a very odd couple. Orange County, 1975: Appliance salesman Walter Wells (Raphael Sbarge) lives the California dream: a beautiful wife, great kids, a pool in the back of his sunny modernist home. But when a disaster suddenly upends his life, Walter is utterly bereft. His best friends, Unitarian minister Gary (Geoffrey Lower)
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt
Hollywood loves unlikely buddies: Oscar and Felix, Elliott and E.T., House and Wilson. But in Julie Marie Myatt's wry and affecting "The Happy Ones," now at South Coast Repertory, tragedy makes for a very odd couple. Orange County, 1975: Appliance salesman Walter Wells (Raphael Sbarge) lives the California dream: a beautiful wife, great kids, a pool in the back of his sunny modernist home. But when a disaster suddenly upends his life, Walter is utterly bereft. His best friends, Unitarian minister Gary (Geoffrey Lower)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
THE title character of Julie Marie Myatt's "My Wandering Boy," like Godot, is a no-show. But unlike Beckett's classic, there's no doubt that Emmett, the 30-year-old free spirit who one day wandered into oblivion, once existed. We're shown pictures of him as a baby. We're given descriptions of him by his girlfriends. We even meet his dog. Yet it's hard to say that anyone really knew the guy. His identity remains a mystery wrapped inside an enigma.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2008 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
Where DO babies come from? That question keeps getting trickier. Adoption, surrogacy and medical advances have created unexpected options for hundreds of thousands of women and men who might otherwise have little chance of starting a family. "As reproductive technologies keep changing, the ability to choose when to have kids, to not be locked into a certain age range, gets down to what choice really means," says Michael John Garces, artistic director of the Cornerstone Theater Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2008 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
Where DO babies come from? That question keeps getting trickier. Adoption, surrogacy and medical advances have created unexpected options for hundreds of thousands of women and men who might otherwise have little chance of starting a family. "As reproductive technologies keep changing, the ability to choose when to have kids, to not be locked into a certain age range, gets down to what choice really means," says Michael John Garces, artistic director of the Cornerstone Theater Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
UNTIL a few months ago, Julie Marie Myatt was struggling with the loneliness of the long-distance playwriting career -- as in a long distance from financial security and an even longer distance from being noted, let alone famous. Now the former long-distance runner -- she finished the 1995 L.A. Marathon in 3:39:10, good for 126th place -- has all the company an emerging playwright could want.
NEWS
December 7, 2001
Theater locale--Quantum Theatre Company's production of Julie Marie Myatt's play "The Pink Factor" is playing tonight through Sunday at the Moving Arts Theatre, 1822 Hyperion Ave., Silver Lake. The show has been listed incorrectly as playing at Moving Arts' other venue, the Los Angeles Theatre Center, in Calendar Weekend and in Sunday Calendar.
NEWS
April 5, 2007
"My Wandering Boy," a drama from L.A. playwright Julie Marie Myatt premiering at South Coast Repertory, traces the odyssey of a charismatic young man who went missing after college. For the retired cop (played by Charlie Robinson) hired to find him, every clue leads to more mystery. The search begins when a down-and-outer is found to be wearing the vanished young man's boots. It leads to men and women who fell under his spell as he moved on for reasons unknown. Bill Rauch directs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2007 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Pulitzer Prize winner Donald Margulies and Tony winner Richard Greenberg are among the veteran playwrights whose work will be presented at this year's Pacific Playwrights Festival, South Coast Repertory's annual weekend of new plays. The festival, a breeding ground for plays that have achieved national prominence, takes place May 4 to 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
Amid all the baby mania in "Someday," the second installment of Cornerstone Theater Company's multi-play Justice Cycle -- this one focused on the complicated new world of reproductive politics -- the last lines of Anne Sexton's "The Double Image" kept echoing in my mind. Filled with a mother's remorse after another suicide attempt, the poem builds to Sexton's sorrowful confession to her daughter: "And this was my worst guilt; you could not cure / nor soothe it. I made you to find me."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
THE title character of Julie Marie Myatt's "My Wandering Boy," like Godot, is a no-show. But unlike Beckett's classic, there's no doubt that Emmett, the 30-year-old free spirit who one day wandered into oblivion, once existed. We're shown pictures of him as a baby. We're given descriptions of him by his girlfriends. We even meet his dog. Yet it's hard to say that anyone really knew the guy. His identity remains a mystery wrapped inside an enigma.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
UNTIL a few months ago, Julie Marie Myatt was struggling with the loneliness of the long-distance playwriting career -- as in a long distance from financial security and an even longer distance from being noted, let alone famous. Now the former long-distance runner -- she finished the 1995 L.A. Marathon in 3:39:10, good for 126th place -- has all the company an emerging playwright could want.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Charting a 2009-10 season in the face of economic head winds unprecedented in its 45 years, South Coast Repertory has made some concessions to the unforgiving climate but has chosen to stay mostly on course. Next season's play list for the Costa Mesa company, which made its name on the national scene as a launching pad for new work, features four world premieres out of nine main stage selections -- plus two new shows in the theater's three-play Theatre for Young Audiences series. But "King Lear," an expensive undertaking with about a dozen major characters and multiple scene changes, is being put off indefinitely after originally having been announced for the current season, then postponed a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Matt Cooper
Wherefore art thou, "Romeo & Juliet"? At Independent Shakespeare Co., that's where. Plus, Parson's Nose tells of "Little Sophie's Misfortunes," and "Salome" is just trying to get a head at Archway Studio/Theatre. Birder Reading of Julie Marie Myatt's new comedy about a local man's introduction to L.A.'s unique urban ecology. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Blvd., L.A. Sunday, 7 p.m. Free. (213) 763-3466. Ruthless: The Musical! Musical Theatre Guild stages this send-up of child actors, stage mothers and other showbiz types.
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