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August 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It's not just the French who have a better handle on sexy material than Americans -- Canadians do, too. The film "Blue Is the Warmest Color," notorious for its sexy scenes between two young women, took the top prize at Cannes this year. But it's had a hard time finding its way into American theaters. This week it was announced that it will be released this fall with an NC-17 rating, the first NC-17 film of 2013. Sundance Selects/IFC Films President Jonathan Sehring said in a statement that the company "refused to compromise [director Abdellatif]
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Blue Is the Warmest Color Criterion, $19.95; Blu-ray, $24.95 Available on VOD beginning Feb. 25 For all the controversy over the explicit sex in writer-director Abdellatif Kechiche's three-hour adaptation of Julie Maroh's graphic novel "Blue Is the Warmest Color," the film is ultimately just a sensitive and honest coming-of-age story, showing how a teenager discovers who she is with the help of her older lesbian girlfriend, then has to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The moral of "Blue Is the Warmest Color" is simple: Sex without love is nothing; life without love is even less. French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche's story of sexual awakening and real love stretches over 10 years. Loosely based on Julie Maroh's superbly illustrated graphic novel and adapted for the screen by Kechiche and Ghalya Lacroix, it traces the life cycle of a relationship beginning to end. The telling is beautiful and explicit. The truth of its emotionally raw, romantic drama is eternal and universal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Sam Adams
- In "Blue Is the Warmest Color," Adèle Exarchopoulos plays a French student who has an intensely passionate, excruciatingly painful relationship with an older woman (Léa Seydoux). Making the film, she says, was much the same. "He changed my life," Exarchopoulos said of writer-director Abdellatif Kechiche, who based the story on the first half of Julie Maroh's graphic novel. "Not because of this movie, but because of the experience. " The experience, for all involved, by all accounts, seems to have been a rocky one, but the reviews for the October release have been strong, especially for Exarchopoulos and Seydoux, who shared the acting prize at the Cannes Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Sam Adams
- In "Blue Is the Warmest Color," Adèle Exarchopoulos plays a French student who has an intensely passionate, excruciatingly painful relationship with an older woman (Léa Seydoux). Making the film, she says, was much the same. "He changed my life," Exarchopoulos said of writer-director Abdellatif Kechiche, who based the story on the first half of Julie Maroh's graphic novel. "Not because of this movie, but because of the experience. " The experience, for all involved, by all accounts, seems to have been a rocky one, but the reviews for the October release have been strong, especially for Exarchopoulos and Seydoux, who shared the acting prize at the Cannes Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2014 | By Noel Murray
Blue Is the Warmest Color Criterion, $19.95; Blu-ray, $24.95 Available on VOD beginning Feb. 25 For all the controversy over the explicit sex in writer-director Abdellatif Kechiche's three-hour adaptation of Julie Maroh's graphic novel "Blue Is the Warmest Color," the film is ultimately just a sensitive and honest coming-of-age story, showing how a teenager discovers who she is with the help of her older lesbian girlfriend, then has to...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Passion. Triumph. Heartbreak. Betrayal. Renewal. This describes not only the story told in "Blue Is the Warmest Color" but also in many ways the tempestuous, topsy-turvy saga the French film's director and two lead actresses have themselves faced since the movie's world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May. The film, opening Oct. 25 in Los Angeles, is an epic-length telling of a most intimate story. With a running time of nearly three hours and a story that spans some five years, the film explores the relationship between a young woman named Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Julie Maroh, the French graphic novelist who created "Le Bleu Est une Couleur Chaude," has said the film version "turned into porn. " The French film, known by the titles "La Vie d'Adèle" and "Blue is the Warmest Color," won the Palm D'Or at Cannes this week. When "La Vie d'Adèle" took the top award at Cannes, even jury president Steven Spielberg admitted it might be too explicit for some audiences. The three-hour film, directed by Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Adele Exarchopulos and Lea Seydoux, tells the story of a 15-year-old girl who falls in love with a woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. The French drama "Blue is the Warmest Color" won the prestigious Palme d'Or at Cannes on Sunday, making it the first graphic-novel adaptation to take the top award. Another comic-based film, Marjane Satrapi's "Persepolis," tied for the Cannes Jury Prize in 2007 . The Palme d'Or winner is based on "Le Bleu Est une Couleur Chaude" ("Blue is a Hot Color"), a graphic novel by Julie Maroh that was published in 2010 in France.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The moral of "Blue Is the Warmest Color" is simple: Sex without love is nothing; life without love is even less. French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche's story of sexual awakening and real love stretches over 10 years. Loosely based on Julie Maroh's superbly illustrated graphic novel and adapted for the screen by Kechiche and Ghalya Lacroix, it traces the life cycle of a relationship beginning to end. The telling is beautiful and explicit. The truth of its emotionally raw, romantic drama is eternal and universal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Passion. Triumph. Heartbreak. Betrayal. Renewal. This describes not only the story told in "Blue Is the Warmest Color" but also in many ways the tempestuous, topsy-turvy saga the French film's director and two lead actresses have themselves faced since the movie's world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May. The film, opening Oct. 25 in Los Angeles, is an epic-length telling of a most intimate story. With a running time of nearly three hours and a story that spans some five years, the film explores the relationship between a young woman named Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It's not just the French who have a better handle on sexy material than Americans -- Canadians do, too. The film "Blue Is the Warmest Color," notorious for its sexy scenes between two young women, took the top prize at Cannes this year. But it's had a hard time finding its way into American theaters. This week it was announced that it will be released this fall with an NC-17 rating, the first NC-17 film of 2013. Sundance Selects/IFC Films President Jonathan Sehring said in a statement that the company "refused to compromise [director Abdellatif]
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