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Julie Newmar

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | MICHAEL KEARNS
The depiction of male homosexuality by avowed heterosexuals seems to be in vogue: two members of Red Hot Chili Peppers smooching on the cover of Guitar magazine in addition to that trio of rogue actors--dressed like women, oh my!--in "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar." As an avowed gay man, I say, "Thanks but no thanks."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | Susan King
Two years before she became the object of young men's fantasies as Catwoman on the ABC series "Batman," Julie Newmar starred as a shapely robot named Rhoda on the 1964-65 CBS sitcom "My Living Doll. " The series, though, never had a chance. It premiered on Sunday opposite the No. 1 show on TV at the time, NBC's "Bonanza," and then moved midseason to Wednesday evenings opposite yet another high profile western on the Peacock network, "The Virginian. " The series was axed after 26 episodes, and "My Living Doll" all but disappeared from public view.
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NEWS
February 28, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Newmar, arguably the most memorable Catwoman from the campy '60s "Batman" TV series with Adam West, still finds it delightful when fans approach her. "I have to give them their own personal purr," she says, laughing. Newmar, who is now primarily a businesswoman, found working on "Batman" both invigorating and challenging. "Each show took us two days to shoot," she recalls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2004 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It's an unlikely place for a catfight -- a sedate Brentwood neighborhood lined with orderly homes and gardens and 25 streets in a row named "Helena Drive." But right in the middle, just off 12th Helena Drive, is where TV's Catwoman and the star of the "K-9" movies are hissing and growling at each other over the backyard fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2012 | Susan King
Two years before she became the object of young men's fantasies as Catwoman on the ABC series "Batman," Julie Newmar starred as a shapely robot named Rhoda on the 1964-65 CBS sitcom "My Living Doll. " The series, though, never had a chance. It premiered on Sunday opposite the No. 1 show on TV at the time, NBC's "Bonanza," and then moved midseason to Wednesday evenings opposite yet another high profile western on the Peacock network, "The Virginian. " The series was axed after 26 episodes, and "My Living Doll" all but disappeared from public view.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1989
Such censorship reminds us of the vapid "art" once sanctioned by the Nazis and Stalin's Communists. JULIE NEWMAR Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995 | Bryan Mingle, Bryan Mingle is an editor for TV Times.
Julie Newmar gets title billing for less than 60 seconds of screen time, but she achieves much more in the up coming "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar." Call it icon status. And it's not just the Catwoman thing from the 1966-68 "Batman" TV series. The title "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Lee Meriwether" wouldn't have quite the impact. Maybe "Thanks for Everything, Eartha Kitt" (which was considered, but that's another story).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2004 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
It's an unlikely place for a catfight -- a sedate Brentwood neighborhood lined with orderly homes and gardens and 25 streets in a row named "Helena Drive." But right in the middle, just off 12th Helena Drive, is where TV's Catwoman and the star of the "K-9" movies are hissing and growling at each other over the backyard fence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not perhaps the first movie you'd think of as family fare, "To Wong Foo" attracted a sizable group of children to a recent screening, most of whom expected some standard yuks over men dressing up in women's clothing. Instead, they got something of an education about the distinction between transsexuals, transvestites and drag queens (the latter being "gay men with way too much fashion sense for one gender"), a detailed look at the trappings of gender disguise and a gentle message abouttolerance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | MICHAEL KEARNS
The depiction of male homosexuality by avowed heterosexuals seems to be in vogue: two members of Red Hot Chili Peppers smooching on the cover of Guitar magazine in addition to that trio of rogue actors--dressed like women, oh my!--in "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar." As an avowed gay man, I say, "Thanks but no thanks."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1995 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not perhaps the first movie you'd think of as family fare, "To Wong Foo" attracted a sizable group of children to a recent screening, most of whom expected some standard yuks over men dressing up in women's clothing. Instead, they got something of an education about the distinction between transsexuals, transvestites and drag queens (the latter being "gay men with way too much fashion sense for one gender"), a detailed look at the trappings of gender disguise and a gentle message abouttolerance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995 | Bryan Mingle, Bryan Mingle is an editor for TV Times.
Julie Newmar gets title billing for less than 60 seconds of screen time, but she achieves much more in the up coming "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar." Call it icon status. And it's not just the Catwoman thing from the 1966-68 "Batman" TV series. The title "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything, Lee Meriwether" wouldn't have quite the impact. Maybe "Thanks for Everything, Eartha Kitt" (which was considered, but that's another story).
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julie Newmar, arguably the most memorable Catwoman from the campy '60s "Batman" TV series with Adam West, still finds it delightful when fans approach her. "I have to give them their own personal purr," she says, laughing. Newmar, who is now primarily a businesswoman, found working on "Batman" both invigorating and challenging. "Each show took us two days to shoot," she recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1989
Such censorship reminds us of the vapid "art" once sanctioned by the Nazis and Stalin's Communists. JULIE NEWMAR Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"The Jewish Heritage in American Folk Art," an exploration of a facet of folk creativity organized by the Museum of Folk Art and the Jewish Museum in New York, is on view at the Hebrew Union College's Skirball Museum through April 27. The exhibition consists of about ceremonial and secular objects from 1720 to the present. The earliest generations of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewish settlers, few in numbers, tended to assimilate their cultural patterns with those of the local population.
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