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Julie Parisien

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SPORTS
December 25, 1997 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Picabo Street and the dawning of the new age of Aquarius in women's alpine skiing, she was America's next rising star. Julie Parisien reigned as the world's top female slalom skier before a second-run slalom meltdown at the 1992 Albertville Olympics cost her the gold medal and triggered a slippery slope career slide that hit hay bales last spring, when Parisien contemplated a mutinous act.
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SPORTS
December 25, 1997 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Picabo Street and the dawning of the new age of Aquarius in women's alpine skiing, she was America's next rising star. Julie Parisien reigned as the world's top female slalom skier before a second-run slalom meltdown at the 1992 Albertville Olympics cost her the gold medal and triggered a slippery slope career slide that hit hay bales last spring, when Parisien contemplated a mutinous act.
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SPORTS
November 23, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Julie Parisien beat an international field in a slalom race at Beaver Creek, Colo.
SPORTS
March 9, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Skier Julie Parisien, still distraught over the death of her brother more than a year ago, announced Tuesday that she will take the rest of the season off. The announcement was no surprise. At the Olympics, Parisien strongly suggested that she would take a sabbatical from ski racing because of lingering emotional duress over the death of older brother, Jean-Paul, killed in an automobile accident in December, 1992.
SPORTS
February 22, 1992 | BOB LOCHNER
Julie Parisien, who skied in Thursday's slalom at Meribel with a cast on her broken wrist, refused to blame the injury for her losing the first-run lead and finishing fourth--but she said it didn't help. "At the start, I wasn't able to bend over and buckle my boots," she said. "It affected little things like that, making me lose some of my concentration. And in the race, sometimes I couldn't plant a pole the way I normally would.
SPORTS
March 9, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
Skier Julie Parisien, still distraught over the death of her brother more than a year ago, announced Tuesday that she will take the rest of the season off. The announcement was no surprise. At the Olympics, Parisien strongly suggested that she would take a sabbatical from ski racing because of lingering emotional duress over the death of older brother, Jean-Paul, killed in an automobile accident in December, 1992.
SPORTS
December 5, 1992 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week, she overcame flu and the burden of her No. 1 world ranking to win the first World Cup slalom event of the season at Park City, Utah. This week, Julie Parisien sets out to prove she was no one-week wonder as she leads a strong U.S. women's team here in the Ski Town USA Classic, the second stop on the World Cup tour. Parisien, a 21-year-old rising star from Sugarloaf, Me., will compete in today's giant slalom and Sunday's slalom. Slalom is Parisien's specialty, although the U.S.
SPORTS
February 13, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took U.S. skier Julie Parisien 20 years to reach the mountaintop in ski racing, but less than one year to lose an Olympic gold medal and her brother. So much for life's fairness. So much for 1992. Grief, cloaked in degrees, became Parisien's night stalker. The Olympic loss struck first--what a gnawing pain it seemed then--on the slopes of Meribel, France, at the 1992 Albertville Games. A month before, Parisien had crashed into a recreational skier and lost four front teeth.
SPORTS
February 9, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Julie Parisien of Auburn, Me., won the silver medal in slalom at the World Alpine ski championships at Morioka-Shizukuishi, Japan. She finished in an unofficial time of 1 minutes 27.87 seconds, two-tenths of a second behind Karin Buder of Austria. Parisien was second after the first run to Annelies Coberger, trailing by 0.43 seconds.
SPORTS
February 13, 1994 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took U.S. skier Julie Parisien 20 years to reach the mountaintop in ski racing, but less than one year to lose an Olympic gold medal and her brother. So much for life's fairness. So much for 1992. Grief, cloaked in degrees, became Parisien's night stalker. The Olympic loss struck first--what a gnawing pain it seemed then--on the slopes of Meribel, France, at the 1992 Albertville Games. A month before, Parisien had crashed into a recreational skier and lost four front teeth.
SPORTS
December 5, 1992 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week, she overcame flu and the burden of her No. 1 world ranking to win the first World Cup slalom event of the season at Park City, Utah. This week, Julie Parisien sets out to prove she was no one-week wonder as she leads a strong U.S. women's team here in the Ski Town USA Classic, the second stop on the World Cup tour. Parisien, a 21-year-old rising star from Sugarloaf, Me., will compete in today's giant slalom and Sunday's slalom. Slalom is Parisien's specialty, although the U.S.
SPORTS
November 23, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Julie Parisien beat an international field in a slalom race at Beaver Creek, Colo.
SPORTS
February 22, 1992 | BOB LOCHNER
Julie Parisien, who skied in Thursday's slalom at Meribel with a cast on her broken wrist, refused to blame the injury for her losing the first-run lead and finishing fourth--but she said it didn't help. "At the start, I wasn't able to bend over and buckle my boots," she said. "It affected little things like that, making me lose some of my concentration. And in the race, sometimes I couldn't plant a pole the way I normally would.
SPORTS
March 30, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Julie Parisien of Auburn, Me., won the slalom in the North American Championship Series at Attitash, N.H. Parisien, who fell during Thursday's giant slalom, covered the 59-gate course in a combined 1 minute 36.16 seconds. Stefanie Schuster of Austria was second in 1:36.71 and Gabriela Zingre of Switzerland third in 1:36.72 . . . U.S. ski team veteran Tiger Shaw won a North American Championship Series slalom at Mt. Mansfield, Vt.
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