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Julie Steinberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1991
When and where it was written in stone that loud and fast were negative things? Personally, I feel someone like Sinead O'Connor is too quiet, too slow and too bald. ALISON A. COBIAN Anaheim Hills
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1991
When and where it was written in stone that loud and fast were negative things? Personally, I feel someone like Sinead O'Connor is too quiet, too slow and too bald. ALISON A. COBIAN Anaheim Hills
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN
Violin, piano and percussion make an unlikely chamber music combination. But it could become a standard format if David Abel, Julie Steinberg and William Winant can reach a wide enough audience. Certainly they have already generated an impressive body of literature for their instrumentation. Friday they gave stunning performances of four works new to Los Angeles before a small crowd--heavy on composers and critics--at UCLA's Schoenberg Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
There were surprising signs of life--in a series that has been accused of morbidity--at Monday Evening Concerts this week. That vitality emerged directly from the performers, the Bay Area trio composed of violinist David Abel, pianist Julie Steinberg and percussionist William Winant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
In 1964, San Francisco--maverick haven at the tail end of the Beat era and in the early days of the hippies--witnessed what is now one of the legends of late-century modern music--the premiere of Terry Riley's "In C," the work that began Minimalism. It was a wild event in a small, dilapidated loft in the Mission district that housed the San Francisco Tape Music Center. The police attempted to shut down the second performance, figuring the joyous audience had to be stoned. That was then.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | MARK SWED, MUSIC CRITIC
There isn't much sex in John Adams' operas or his work in general, which might explain why "Eros Piano" is so neglected. But there is plenty of musical sensuality all through his music, so even that explanation doesn't quite account for why this lush, torchy 1989 valentine for piano and orchestra is seldom heard and has had but a single recording. Still, at least a few have fallen for "Eros Piano." Five years ago, Peter Martins choreographed the score for New York City Ballet. And for her annual contribution to the Piano Spheres series, Vicki Ray took matters into her own hands Tuesday night at the Colburn School's Zipper Concert Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The Deadheads returned to Davies Symphony Hall on Sunday. And they returned, this time, on the promise of actually hearing the surviving members of the Grateful Dead. On Friday and Saturday nights, the Deadheads in attendance had been the talk of the opening of the San Francisco Symphony's American Festival, since the band itself, which appeared in John Cage's "Renga," was a practically inaudible part of a vast sonic mix.
SPORTS
September 6, 2001 | Staff and Wire Reports
With injured Maurice Greene on the sidelines doing television commentary, Britain's Dwain Chambers won the 100 meters at the Goodwill Games on Wednesday at Brisbane, Australia. Chambers beat his rivals out of the blocks and held off American Tim Montgomery's late kick, winning in 10.11 seconds. Montgomery started slowly but rallied to finish second in 10.27. Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago was fifth, .30 behind the winner.
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