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Julien Levy

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October 5, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Julien Levy made his name in New York as a visionary art dealer who introduced Surrealism to America and promoted the international avant-garde in the 1930s and '40s. A free spirit with more intellectual curiosity and aesthetic passion than business sense, he operated his gallery from the dark days of the Depression to the dawning of postwar prosperity, serving as a cultural ambassador while New York established itself as the center of the art world.
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October 5, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Julien Levy made his name in New York as a visionary art dealer who introduced Surrealism to America and promoted the international avant-garde in the 1930s and '40s. A free spirit with more intellectual curiosity and aesthetic passion than business sense, he operated his gallery from the dark days of the Depression to the dawning of postwar prosperity, serving as a cultural ambassador while New York established itself as the center of the art world.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2012 | By Joy Press, Los Angeles Times
Over more than a century, Dorothea Tanning collided and consorted with artistic titans of the 20th century who included Pablo Picasso, John Cage and Joseph Cornell. She designed sets for George Balanchine ballets, played romantic matchmaker for poet Andre Breton and appeared in Hans Richter's avant-garde films - but she remained best known as the wife of Surrealist Max Ernst, to whom she was married for nearly 30 years Tanning, who was also a celebrated American artist and poet, and came to be known as "the last living Surrealist," died Tuesday at her New York City home, according to the Dorothea Tanning Collection and Archive, a foundation she established in 1995 to preserve her work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2002 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Chilean artist Roberto Sebastian Antonio Matta Echaurren -- known for Surrealistic images of cosmic wonderlands and apocalyptic dreams, executed under the name of Matta -- died Saturday in Italy, at 91. He had been hospitalized in Civitavecchia, near his home in the Tuscan town of Tarquinia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1992 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Beyond doubt, the accepted myth of our recent past is in some measure the creation of this photographer," says scholar and curator John Szarkowski of Walker Evans. Indeed, Evans' work, particularly his images of rural poverty shot during the Depression, has come to represent an essential aspect of America's collective identity of the first half of this century.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Exhibitions presenting the work of James Turrell and Manny Farber and an acoustic sculptural environment by Michael Brewster open at MOCA's Temporary Contemporary Nov. 13 to continue through Feb. 9. One of the most significant figures to emerge on the West Coast, Turrell has worked with light, space and perception since the 1960s. Although his installations have received national and international attention, this is Turrell's first major exhibition in Los Angeles since 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999
Liberated by Frida's lengthy absence, and liberated from the obligation to entertain the Trotskys, Rivera now abandoned his political activities. He resigned from the editorial board of Clave in January 1939 and was thenceforth free to concentrate on his work and his social life, hoping wherever possible to combine them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1997 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A small still life, which looks as though it were wrested from a fever dream, is one of the many wonders in a show of Arshile Gorky's drawings of the 1930s and 1940s at Manny Silverman Gallery. All phallic protuberances and sharp, spiky leaves, it seems to follow the Freudian logic of condensation and displacement. But it is too refined, as if the dream had been stripped of excess in the service of clarity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"It was so surreal," said a callow young movie actor on a TV chat-show the other night, as he described the odd sensation of seeing himself on the big screen for the first time. Surreal , the term of art he used to describe an inexplicable feeling, is one that long ago slipped into the lexicon of popular slang.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
What should we make of the fact that six exhibitions of Surrealist art open in Los Angeles this month? Is there something millennial afoot? An insider plot to manipulate the art market? Couldn't anybody come up with an idea for something new to show? The answer is more elemental than any of that.
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