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Juliette

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
C-sharp minor - the mere words conjure up a sense of anxious edge, which is the feeling that drives "A Late Quartet. " Starring Christopher Walken, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener and Mark Ivanir as the players, this is a chamber piece about chamber musicians that is set to Beethoven's emotional Opus 131 string quartet - in C-sharp minor. As much as the movie is shaped by the piece - Opus 131 is a complex, demanding work - "A Late Quartet" is not really about the music. Director Yaron Zilberman, a chamber music fan, is using the intimate collaboration required of a string quartet to examine the way in which lives become dangerously entangled over time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Gifted and tormented sculptor, involuntary mental patient, enduring symbol of female passion quashed by patriarchal convention - Camille Claudel is nothing if not a rich subject for storytellers. "Camille Claudel 1915," the tough and measured feature by Bruno Dumont, is a very different animal from the high melodrama of the 1988 biopic starring Isabelle Adjani. That's no surprise from a filmmaker who traffics in austerity and a performer, Juliette Binoche, who's ever resistant to the obvious and formulaic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
" Cairo Time" stars Patricia Clarkson in a lovely and languid flirtation with a foreign land, an exotic man and the possibility that, long after the future seems set in stone, it might not be quite so predictable after all. Canadian writer-director Ruba Nadda's new film feeds off the cool beauty of Clarkson and the dry heat of Alexander Siddig as strangers thrown together by circumstance. Also in play are the romantic notions that so often accompany travel, primarily those daydreams of chucking the life you have for the life you imagine you might have if only, if only, if only ... . Clarkson is Juliette, a sophisticate headed to Cairo for a vacation with her husband, Mark (Tom McCamus)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David Ng
Seventy years after her death in a mental hospital where she had lived for the last three decades of her life, French sculptor Camille Claudel continues to fascinate even if her artistic talent is obscured by her madness and her work exists perpetually in the shadow of her mentor and ex-lover, Auguste Rodin. "Camille Claudel 1915," directed by Bruno Dumont and starring Juliette Binoche, is the latest dramatic portrayal of the psychologically troubled artist. The movie, which opens Friday in Los Angeles, focuses on just three days in the artist's life during her stay at a psychiatric institution in Montdevergues in the south of France.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
NBC's "Grimm" and ABC's "Once Upon a Time" are two structurally different shows — one is a police procedural, the other a family drama — that share the same twist: fairy tales as historical nonfiction. In "Grimm," David Giuntoli plays Nick Burckhardt, a Portland, Ore., police detective who discovers that he is the latest in a long line of second-sighted slayers, sort of like Buffy only with fairy-tale monsters instead of vampires. In "Once Upon a Time," Jennifer Morrison (late of "House")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "Mama, There's a Man in Your Bed," which opens the Santa Barbara International Film Festival tonight, French writer-director Coline Serreau may have another international hit on her hands. Serreau's "Three Men and a Cradle," remade as "Three Men and a Baby" by Disney, was such a big success--in both versions--that Disney's Hollywood Pictures has signed her to both direct an English remake of "Mama" and then to write and direct a sequel. It's no wonder that Disney came calling.
NEWS
April 10, 1994
Once upon a time--actually, it was Feb. 10--Jonathan Bogner of West Los Angeles went for a walk with his 1-year-old son on his back and his 2-year-old dog, Juliette, at his heels. As they passed a neighbor's house, the neighbor asked if Juliette was responsible for the doggie deposit on his lawn, Bogner said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There is a four-minute clip on YouTube of the 1993 screen test of Romain Duris, one of France's most versatile, charismatic actors. He was all of 18, a student at art school who also was a drummer in a band and a pizza delivery boy. He was discovered by a casting agent standing outside his school one day. With his wild hair, snaggle-toothed grin and je ne sais quoi attitude, Duris already had star quality. Now 36, Duris remains disarmingly disheveled. He's earned three Cesar nominations, including one for Jacques Audiard's award-winning 2005 drama, "The Beat That My Heart Skipped," in which he played a real estate tough torn between his criminal life and his wish to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a concert pianist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2005
Mark Swed's review of Charles Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" did a great disservice to the Los Angeles Opera company and to opera lovers throughout Southern California ["Romeo and ... What's Her Name," Jan. 31]. The audience did indeed, as he pointed out, rise to its feet at the conclusion, because we had just been mesmerized and enthralled by a beautifully acted and passionately sung performance by both principal singers, in an excellent production whose director was appropriately cheered as well by both audience and cast.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Tropical Storm Juliette strengthened into a hurricane and continued to churn slowly away from land, but forecasters warned that a slight change in its motion could threaten Mexico's Pacific coast. The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami reported that Juliette had sustained winds of 115 mph and was expected to continue to pick up strength. Juliette was 300 miles south-southeast of Manzanillo on Sunday and was heading west at 7 mph.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
C-sharp minor - the mere words conjure up a sense of anxious edge, which is the feeling that drives "A Late Quartet. " Starring Christopher Walken, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener and Mark Ivanir as the players, this is a chamber piece about chamber musicians that is set to Beethoven's emotional Opus 131 string quartet - in C-sharp minor. As much as the movie is shaped by the piece - Opus 131 is a complex, demanding work - "A Late Quartet" is not really about the music. Director Yaron Zilberman, a chamber music fan, is using the intimate collaboration required of a string quartet to examine the way in which lives become dangerously entangled over time.
FOOD
May 26, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
I don't know anything about the Fat Monk depicted on a bottom corner of the label hoisting a wine glass, halo hovering over his head. But I would like to second that halo for making a terrific everyday Pinot at an everyday price. I first tasted this wine when an astute friend brought it to dinner months ago. She'd scooped up the last few bottles at Surfas but kept an eye out and when they restocked and picked up half a dozen bottles for me. Now it seems to be around at a few more places.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Once an industry standard for new dramas, the two-hour premiere has become rare enough to acquire an alarming air; as with 10-minute film trailers or wildly enthusiastic blind-date suggestions, one quickly catches the underlying whiff of desperation. And indeed, NBC's new legal thriller "The Firm" is so front-loaded for success — John Grisham! Josh Lucas! Juliette Lewis! — that even two hours feel uncomfortably crammed, with back story and B-plot, family drama and legalese, potential conspiracies and sentimental posturing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2011 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
NBC's "Grimm" and ABC's "Once Upon a Time" are two structurally different shows — one is a police procedural, the other a family drama — that share the same twist: fairy tales as historical nonfiction. In "Grimm," David Giuntoli plays Nick Burckhardt, a Portland, Ore., police detective who discovers that he is the latest in a long line of second-sighted slayers, sort of like Buffy only with fairy-tale monsters instead of vampires. In "Once Upon a Time," Jennifer Morrison (late of "House")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Certified Copy," Abbas Kiarostami's lovely labyrinth of a film, is best seen without having read reviews that divulge what the director reveals ? or hints at ? only gradually (this one won't). The two-hander's teases and twists carry an electric charge, particularly in the riveting performance of Juliette Binoche, by turns dithery, fevered and open-hearted. She plays the unnamed French owner of an antique shop in Tuscany, raising a tween son who challenges her every move ? when he bothers to look up from his video game.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Slick entertainment is rarely as, yes, slickly entertaining as it is in "Heartbreaker," a French romantic farce that is commercial cinema at its most successful. Given that Hollywood has all but forgotten how to turn out adult amusements of this type, it's especially welcome. A major box office hit in France, "Heartbreaker" took a certain risk in featuring two major dramatic stars, Romain Duris and Vanessa Paradis, who'd never done romantic comedy before. You'd never know that from what's on screen, however, as both performers throw themselves into the parts with enthusiasm and panache.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There is a four-minute clip on YouTube of the 1993 screen test of Romain Duris, one of France's most versatile, charismatic actors. He was all of 18, a student at art school who also was a drummer in a band and a pizza delivery boy. He was discovered by a casting agent standing outside his school one day. With his wild hair, snaggle-toothed grin and je ne sais quoi attitude, Duris already had star quality. Now 36, Duris remains disarmingly disheveled. He's earned three Cesar nominations, including one for Jacques Audiard's award-winning 2005 drama, "The Beat That My Heart Skipped," in which he played a real estate tough torn between his criminal life and his wish to fulfill a lifelong dream of becoming a concert pianist.
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