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Juliette Binoche

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David Ng
Seventy years after her death in a mental hospital where she had lived for the last three decades of her life, French sculptor Camille Claudel continues to fascinate even if her artistic talent is obscured by her madness and her work exists perpetually in the shadow of her mentor and ex-lover, Auguste Rodin. "Camille Claudel 1915," directed by Bruno Dumont and starring Juliette Binoche, is the latest dramatic portrayal of the psychologically troubled artist. The movie, which opens Friday in Los Angeles, focuses on just three days in the artist's life during her stay at a psychiatric institution in Montdevergues in the south of France.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Gifted and tormented sculptor, involuntary mental patient, enduring symbol of female passion quashed by patriarchal convention - Camille Claudel is nothing if not a rich subject for storytellers. "Camille Claudel 1915," the tough and measured feature by Bruno Dumont, is a very different animal from the high melodrama of the 1988 biopic starring Isabelle Adjani. That's no surprise from a filmmaker who traffics in austerity and a performer, Juliette Binoche, who's ever resistant to the obvious and formulaic.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If what you're looking for in film is vampires running amok or maniacs slicing and dicing quivering flesh, you never have far to go these days. But if what you want is a star-driven sophisticated romantic comedy that is successfully aimed at actual adults, the wait can seem like forever. Until now. "Dan in Real Life" is such a film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David Ng
Seventy years after her death in a mental hospital where she had lived for the last three decades of her life, French sculptor Camille Claudel continues to fascinate even if her artistic talent is obscured by her madness and her work exists perpetually in the shadow of her mentor and ex-lover, Auguste Rodin. "Camille Claudel 1915," directed by Bruno Dumont and starring Juliette Binoche, is the latest dramatic portrayal of the psychologically troubled artist. The movie, which opens Friday in Los Angeles, focuses on just three days in the artist's life during her stay at a psychiatric institution in Montdevergues in the south of France.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2007 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
It's odd to see Juliette Binoche, the great French star, stomping away on a treadmill, breathing heavily, even, yikes, sweating in a distinctly un-Gallic fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Gifted and tormented sculptor, involuntary mental patient, enduring symbol of female passion quashed by patriarchal convention - Camille Claudel is nothing if not a rich subject for storytellers. "Camille Claudel 1915," the tough and measured feature by Bruno Dumont, is a very different animal from the high melodrama of the 1988 biopic starring Isabelle Adjani. That's no surprise from a filmmaker who traffics in austerity and a performer, Juliette Binoche, who's ever resistant to the obvious and formulaic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a London-based free-lance writer. and
Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind, blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun. Happily the architect had the foresight to build it strong.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Though the late Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski starts with conventional story elements, he conveys them with a striking combination of focused acting and unexpected images. The 1993 film, starring Juliette Binoche (pictured), in an emotional story of a woman's search for meaning after tragedy unhinges her life, has a sense of emotion that is both pared down and intensified.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
As much of a fashion derby as the Academy Awards ceremony has become, there is still no official category for Most Outstanding Gown, no sequin-clad Barbie statuette for the best-dressed to take home--or naked little Elmo as booby prize for the worst. If there were, it would have been tough to call a winner on Monday night.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
The stars, the directors and the producers arrived at the Shrine Auditorium on Monday night for Hollywood's biggest extravaganza of the year--the Academy Awards. First winner of the night: Cuba Gooding Jr., who played a "show-me-the-money" football player whose agent, Jerry Maguire (Tom Cruise) undergoes a personal transformation in the comedy "Jerry Maguire." An exuberant Gooding vowed to stay on the air and thank everyone until the cameras cut away.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Certified Copy," Abbas Kiarostami's lovely labyrinth of a film, is best seen without having read reviews that divulge what the director reveals ? or hints at ? only gradually (this one won't). The two-hander's teases and twists carry an electric charge, particularly in the riveting performance of Juliette Binoche, by turns dithery, fevered and open-hearted. She plays the unnamed French owner of an antique shop in Tuscany, raising a tween son who challenges her every move ? when he bothers to look up from his video game.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If what you're looking for in film is vampires running amok or maniacs slicing and dicing quivering flesh, you never have far to go these days. But if what you want is a star-driven sophisticated romantic comedy that is successfully aimed at actual adults, the wait can seem like forever. Until now. "Dan in Real Life" is such a film.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2007 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
It's odd to see Juliette Binoche, the great French star, stomping away on a treadmill, breathing heavily, even, yikes, sweating in a distinctly un-Gallic fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"In My Country" is the kind of serious, intelligent probing of the work of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up by the government in 1996 to investigate human rights abuses under apartheid, that one would expect from a director of the caliber of John Boorman. He has confronted the horrors straight on but has been stymied by a ponderous script adapted by Ann Peacock from the book "Country of My Skull" by Afrikaans poet Antjie Krog.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juliette Binoche is rapidly becoming the leading romantic heroine of the international cinema with such films as "The English Patient," "Lovers on the Bridge," the current "Chocolat" and now with Patrice Leconte's sweeping, superb "The Widow of Saint-Pierre." A dark-haired beauty of infinite self-possession, Binoche radiates the strength and intelligence of a woman capable of risking all--with her eyes wide open.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chocolat" is as delectable as its title, but for all its sensuality it is ultimately concerned with the spirit. A fable of deceptive simplicity, adapted for the screen with mature skill and wisdom by a young American screenwriter, Robert Nelson Jacobs, from Joanne Harris' novel, it emerges as a splendid work in the grand humanist tradition of the classic cinema of France, where it takes place.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Juliette Binoche is rapidly becoming the leading romantic heroine of the international cinema with such films as "The English Patient," "Lovers on the Bridge," the current "Chocolat" and now with Patrice Leconte's sweeping, superb "The Widow of Saint-Pierre." A dark-haired beauty of infinite self-possession, Binoche radiates the strength and intelligence of a woman capable of risking all--with her eyes wide open.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
Four years have elapsed since Juliette Binoche made the transition from European art-house icon to internationally recognized film actress. She did it in a single leap, in Anthony Minghella's "The English Patient," as Hana, a French Canadian nurse in World War II traumatized by grief when her boyfriend is killed in action.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2000 | LINDA WINER, NEWSDAY
The first time we see Juliette Binoche's Emma, she is sitting at a lone table at the far end of an austere English pub. The floor beneath the scene is turning, slowly carrying the woman around to face the audience at the Roundabout Theatre Company as if she were a precious figurine on a carousel that had once carried joy.
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