Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulio Adolfo Rey Prendes
IN THE NEWS

Julio Adolfo Rey Prendes

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 1, 1988
In a rowdy convention, El Salvador's governing Christian Democratic Party chose wealthy businessman Julio Adolfo Rey Prendes as its candidate in next year's presidential elections. The choice set off a controversy that could split the party. Rey Prendes, a former Cabinet minister, was chosen by acclamation as the sole entry in a convention marked by insults, boos, whistles and catcalls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | Associated Press
A schism in the governing Christian Democratic Party widened Wednesday when a second faction nominated its own presidential candidate for next year's election. Fidel Chavez Mena, a 48-year-old lawyer and former minister of the presidency and communications under current President Jose Napoleon Duarte, was proclaimed unanimously by 180 national delegates gathered at party headquarters in downtown San Salvador.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | Associated Press
A schism in the governing Christian Democratic Party widened Wednesday when a second faction nominated its own presidential candidate for next year's election. Fidel Chavez Mena, a 48-year-old lawyer and former minister of the presidency and communications under current President Jose Napoleon Duarte, was proclaimed unanimously by 180 national delegates gathered at party headquarters in downtown San Salvador.
NEWS
May 1, 1988
In a rowdy convention, El Salvador's governing Christian Democratic Party chose wealthy businessman Julio Adolfo Rey Prendes as its candidate in next year's presidential elections. The choice set off a controversy that could split the party. Rey Prendes, a former Cabinet minister, was chosen by acclamation as the sole entry in a convention marked by insults, boos, whistles and catcalls.
NEWS
September 11, 1985 | (UPI)
The government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte today asked the Roman Catholic Church to help mediate the release of his daughter, who was kidnaped by gunmen believed to be rebels fighting a six-year civil war. In Washington, White House officials said President Reagan conveyed "heartfelt concerns and prayers" for the safety of Duarte's eldest daughter and offered U.S. help in bringing her abductors to justice.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Salvadoran government officials and leftist guerrilla leaders talked into the night Monday, holding the longest round of peace negotiations in nearly eight years of civil war. It was not clear whether the prolonged, two-day session indicated progress or a deadlock between President Jose Napoleon Duarte and commanders of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front.
OPINION
August 31, 1986 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda, a professor of political science at the National University of Mexico and political commentator for the Mexican weekly Proceso, is currently a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.
After nearly two years' interruption, the Salvadoran insurgents and the government of President Napoleon Duarte agreed in Mexico City last week to hold their third round of talks in the small El Salvador village of Cesori on Sept. 19. This comes as good news to the people of that beleaguered country, but the bad news is that the discussions will probably advance no further than the previous ones.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just before dawn on Feb. 9, in the heat of a guerrilla war and an election campaign, arsonists set fire to the offices of El Salvador's only leftist opposition newspaper and crippled its presses. Standing amid the ruins of Diario Latino that day, Editor Francisco Valencia blamed the attack on "the armed forces, the government and their death squads, the same ones who massacre the people and murder priests."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|