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Julio Bocca

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
BUENOS AIRES -- This city really knows how to throw a farewell bash. Under a full moon at the foot of the Obelisk monument -- where Avenida 9 de Julio, said to be the widest avenue in the world, and Avenida Corrientes come together, the Times Square of Argentina -- a crowd estimated from the tens of thousands up to 300,000 worshiped at the altar of dance guru Julio Bocca as the superstar gave his final performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
BUENOS AIRES -- This city really knows how to throw a farewell bash. Under a full moon at the foot of the Obelisk monument -- where Avenida 9 de Julio, said to be the widest avenue in the world, and Avenida Corrientes come together, the Times Square of Argentina -- a crowd estimated from the tens of thousands up to 300,000 worshiped at the altar of dance guru Julio Bocca as the superstar gave his final performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1986 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Along with winning a gold medal at the 1985 Moscow International Ballet Competition, 19-year-old Julio Bocca has the distinction of having danced the "Nutcracker" prince in three far-flung locales--Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Novosibirsk (U.S.S.R.) and, on Friday, Costa Mesa (U.S.A.)--at three major junctures of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2006
BRAVO to dance critic Lewis Segal for literally biting the hand that has fed him. For much too long, ballet has been the standard by which all other commercial dance has been judged. Long ago, composers began reinventing opera into operetta and then musical theater. But the howling dance purists refused to have their beloved "ballet" tinkered and tampered with. George Balanchine rose to prominence by being fed up with the cliches Segal so eloquently wrote about: "Happy slaves, lustful Muslims, murderous Hindus ... it simply buttresses a sense of white Euro-privilege by dramatizing how colorfully nasty things are elsewhere."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | JENNIFER FISHER
The earth seemed to move during the Tuesday performance of Ballet Argentino, its second mixed program at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. Unfortunately, this is not meant poetically, but as one explanation for all the small stumbles, tiny tilts and general shakiness. Take star player Julio Bocca, in a suite of dances from Act III of "Raymonda," by Lidia Segni, after Petipa.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES
At the unprecedented age of 19, Julio Bocca became a principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre in 1986, the youngest principal ABT ever had. How did the Argentine youngster do it? Winning the gold medal at the Fifth International Ballet Competition in Moscow in 1985 certainly helped. But it was more the result of Bocca's longtime single-minded dedication to establishing a dance career.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006
Retiring: Julio Bocca, a principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre for 20 years, will retire after a performance in Kenneth MacMillan's "Manon" at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York on June 22. Monument: The Jamaican government will declare Bob Marley's Kingston home a national monument, 25 years after the reggae legend's death, Minister of Education and Culture Maxine Henry Wilson said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
La Sonnambula found her way into Clark Tippet's "Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1" Thursday night at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. In American Ballet Theatre's second performance of the brand-new piece, Alessandra Ferri offered a dreamy, abstracted edition of the midnight-blue-tutu role first performed Tuesday by Susan Jaffe. In contrast with Jaffe's exquisitely calibrated control, Ferri seemed both listless and impassive, prone to blurring movement that looks better in crisp outline.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
The lyric, swoony, lovers-in-the-twilight ballet has become one of the great cliches of dance. How many times have we seen some ninny in toe shoes arch her back in mindless ecstasy the instant some sweating hulk hoists her over his head?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
At a time when nearly all the great ballet virtuosi subordinate themselves to one choreographic vision or another, Julio Bocca remains a brilliant gadfly. Alternately burning up the stage and chewing the scenery, the 27-year-old Argentine looked equally at home in neo-Soviet kitsch, 19th-Century bravura and balleticized exhibition-ballroom on Monday--the first night in his weeklong engagement at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
THERE has never been anything sedate about tango. After all, it originated in 19th century Buenos Aires with macho men dancing and brawling in brothels in order to work out frustrations or vie for the favors of wanton women. But it gets an added jolt when danced by Julio Bocca.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006
Retiring: Julio Bocca, a principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre for 20 years, will retire after a performance in Kenneth MacMillan's "Manon" at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York on June 22. Monument: The Jamaican government will declare Bob Marley's Kingston home a national monument, 25 years after the reggae legend's death, Minister of Education and Culture Maxine Henry Wilson said Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Coincidences can be enlightening -- Jiri Kylian choreography from both Nederlands Dans Theater and American Ballet Theatre on Southland stages in the same week, for example. Or Ballet Theatre dancing "Romeo and Juliet" downtown on Saturday while Julio Bocca -- one of the company's stellar former Romeos -- performed other company repertory and a new work at the Cerritos Center the same night.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2004 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
I've met dancer Julio Bocca only once. But over the last 17 years, we've spent lots of time together: him performing, me reviewing him. What I couldn't have foreseen from the start was that I was also charting an unusual story in the ballet world -- that of a beloved virtuoso who didn't feel he could call himself an artist until five years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1994 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The earth seemed to move during the Tuesday performance of Ballet Argentino, its second mixed program at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. Unfortunately, this is not meant poetically, but as one explanation for all the small stumbles, tiny tilts and general shakiness. Take star player Julio Bocca, in a suite of dances from Act III of "Raymonda," by Lidia Segni, after Petipa.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
At a time when nearly all the great ballet virtuosi subordinate themselves to one choreographic vision or another, Julio Bocca remains a brilliant gadfly. Alternately burning up the stage and chewing the scenery, the 27-year-old Argentine looked equally at home in neo-Soviet kitsch, 19th-Century bravura and balleticized exhibition-ballroom on Monday--the first night in his weeklong engagement at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2006
BRAVO to dance critic Lewis Segal for literally biting the hand that has fed him. For much too long, ballet has been the standard by which all other commercial dance has been judged. Long ago, composers began reinventing opera into operetta and then musical theater. But the howling dance purists refused to have their beloved "ballet" tinkered and tampered with. George Balanchine rose to prominence by being fed up with the cliches Segal so eloquently wrote about: "Happy slaves, lustful Muslims, murderous Hindus ... it simply buttresses a sense of white Euro-privilege by dramatizing how colorfully nasty things are elsewhere."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1994 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ballet firebrand Julio Bocca bursts onstage like a lightning bolt. He enters a room, however, like it's a library. An international dance celebrity known for virtuosic bravura, the soft-spoken Argentine is self-effacing, almost shy in person. And the reason he formed his own troupe, which will dance seven shows at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts beginning Monday, seems to reflect the same lack of egotism.
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