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Julius C Julio Butler

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. assaulted the credibility of Julius C. "Julio" Butler on Tuesday in an effort to show that the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt did not tell the truth in 1972 when he denied being a law enforcement informant. Cochran focused on Butler's comments in interviews with investigators earlier this year that he either had been given a gun or paid money to buy one by a district attorney's office detective in 1970.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Los Angeles Police sergeant testified Monday that he was "set up" when he was handed a letter implicating former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt in the December 1968 slaying of a schoolteacher in Santa Monica. Duwayne Rice said Julius C. "Julio" Butler, who later became the key prosecution witness against Pratt, gave him an envelope Aug. 10, 1969, saying it was an "insurance policy" to be opened only in the event of Butler's death.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1996
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge who as a deputy district attorney prosecuted Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt in 1972 testified Thursday that he knew his key witness against the former Black Panther Party leader was a felon who illegally carried a loaded gun. Judge Richard P. Kalustian said he did not think it was right for Julius C. "Julio" Butler to violate the law by carrying the pistol, but said he did nothing to stop Butler because "his life was in danger."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene in Orange County Superior Court was a replay of a confrontation nearly a quarter-century earlier. Julius C. "Julio" Butler, the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt, was testifying. Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., Pratt's lead defense attorney in the 1972 murder trial, was again asking the questions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A retired Los Angeles Police sergeant testified Monday that he was "set up" when he was handed a letter implicating former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt in the December 1968 slaying of a schoolteacher in Santa Monica. Duwayne Rice said Julius C. "Julio" Butler, who later became the key prosecution witness against Pratt, gave him an envelope Aug. 10, 1969, saying it was an "insurance policy" to be opened only in the event of Butler's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by a sheaf of FBI documents containing information agents said he provided, the key witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt briefly conceded Wednesday that he could be called an informant under certain circumstances, but maintained that he did not provide confidential information to FBI agents. Julius C. "Julio" Butler, a former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and an ex-Panther, testified that he merely had "conversations" with FBI agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. assaulted the credibility of Julius C. "Julio" Butler on Tuesday in an effort to show that the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt did not tell the truth in 1972 when he denied being a law enforcement informant. Butler's testimony is seen as crucial in Pratt's effort to win a retrial of his 24-year-old murder conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scene in Orange County Superior Court was a replay of a confrontation nearly a quarter-century earlier. Julius C. "Julio" Butler, the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt, was testifying. Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., Pratt's lead defense attorney in the 1972 murder trial, was again asking the questions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1997
Testimony on whether imprisoned former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt's murder conviction should be overturned concluded Friday, leaving Pratt's lawyers optimistic that their client has been given his best chance to win a new trial in the nearly 25 years since his conviction. The thrust of Pratt's request for a new trial was that the key witness against him, Julius C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1997
Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt, the former Black Panther Party leader convicted of murder in 1972, will have to wait a little longer to get the justice he says was denied 25 years ago. Santa Ana Superior Court Judge Everett W. Dickey said he will wait until March 13 to hear final arguments in Pratt's bid to overturn his conviction because Los Angeles prosecutor Brentford Ferreira has not returned to work following a minor stroke two weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1996
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge who as a deputy district attorney prosecuted Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt in 1972 testified Thursday that he knew his key witness against the former Black Panther Party leader was a felon who illegally carried a loaded gun. Judge Richard P. Kalustian said he did not think it was right for Julius C. "Julio" Butler to violate the law by carrying the pistol, but said he did nothing to stop Butler because "his life was in danger."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by a sheaf of FBI documents containing information agents said he provided, the key witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt briefly conceded Wednesday that he could be called an informant under certain circumstances, but maintained that he did not provide confidential information to FBI agents. Julius C. "Julio" Butler, a former Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy and an ex-Panther, testified that he merely had "conversations" with FBI agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. assaulted the credibility of Julius C. "Julio" Butler on Tuesday in an effort to show that the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt did not tell the truth in 1972 when he denied being a law enforcement informant. Butler's testimony is seen as crucial in Pratt's effort to win a retrial of his 24-year-old murder conviction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | EDWARD J. BOYER and SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. assaulted the credibility of Julius C. "Julio" Butler on Tuesday in an effort to show that the key prosecution witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt did not tell the truth in 1972 when he denied being a law enforcement informant. Cochran focused on Butler's comments in interviews with investigators earlier this year that he either had been given a gun or paid money to buy one by a district attorney's office detective in 1970.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1996
A retired Los Angeles district attorney's office investigator who kept a confidential informant card on a key witness against former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt testified Monday he does not recall whether he was even aware that the informant was a witness at Pratt's trial. Clayton R. Anderson, retired chief of the district attorney's Bureau of Investigation, said he was aware that Pratt was being tried for murder in 1972 in a high-profile case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1998 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Black Panther Party leader Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt, whose 1972 murder conviction was overturned a year ago, has filed a federal civil rights suit against the Los Angeles Police Department, the FBI and a key prosecution witness, alleging malicious prosecution. The suit seeks unspecified damages, "but it will be a large amount," said Brian Dunn, one of Pratt's attorneys.
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