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Julius Epstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The script Julius Epstein and his twin brother Philip were writing just before the outbreak of World War II was a typical assignment for the Warner Bros. contract writers. The romantic drama was based on an unproduced play, "Everybody Comes to Rick's." Years later, Julius Epstein commented that the screenplay for the film, released under the title "Casablanca," contained "a great deal of corn, more corn than in the states of Kansas and Iowa combined. But when corn works, there's nothing better."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The script Julius Epstein and his twin brother Philip were writing just before the outbreak of World War II was a typical assignment for the Warner Bros. contract writers. The romantic drama was based on an unproduced play, "Everybody Comes to Rick's." Years later, Julius Epstein commented that the screenplay for the film, released under the title "Casablanca," contained "a great deal of corn, more corn than in the states of Kansas and Iowa combined. But when corn works, there's nothing better."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
As time and 50 years go by, that now classic movie "Casablanca" keeps coming back, twice reduced to home video, colorized, dubbed and redubbed, transmogrified by ABC and CBS into two unsuccessful television series and now heading back to big-screen theaters (April 10 at Mann's Chinese and April 17 at the Ken in San Diego), scrubbed and cleaned up again by the cinematic recyclers of Turner Entertainment. Somehow they keep finding ways to play it again . . . and again . . . and again.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
As time and 50 years go by, that now classic movie "Casablanca" keeps coming back, twice reduced to home video, colorized, dubbed and redubbed, transmogrified by ABC and CBS into two unsuccessful television series and now heading back to big-screen theaters (April 10 at Mann's Chinese and April 17 at the Ken in San Diego), scrubbed and cleaned up again by the cinematic recyclers of Turner Entertainment. Somehow they keep finding ways to play it again . . . and again . . . and again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1993
As whenever a new Western is announced, I'm looking forward to "Bad Girls," the Tamra Davis-directed feature Goldstein mentions. It's interesting to note that the scene she describes from her film, in which a woman turns oral sex into blood revenge, was anticipated 16 years ago in the Julius J. Epstein-Herbert Asmodi script for "Cross of Iron." That film was directed by the noted feminist Sam Peckinpah. JIM BEAVER Van Nuys
BOOKS
January 31, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN
ROUND UP THE USUAL SUSPECTS: The Making of Casablanca--Bogart, Bergman, and World War II by Aljean Harmetz (Hyperion: $24.95; 402 pp.). How could "Casablanca"--made on a studio "assembly line" that churned out movies like canned tuna--have acquired so much soul?
REAL ESTATE
July 11, 1999 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Rock-blues legend Eric Clapton has purchased an ocean-view home in the Santa Monica area for just under $1.2 million. Clapton, 54, auctioned off 100 of his guitars at Christie's in New York in June to raise funds for the Crossroads Centre, a drug-and-alcohol treatment facility that he founded in 1997 on the West Indies island of Antigua. The guitarist-singer-songwriter raised more than $5 million for the center.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | BETTINA BOXALL, Times Staff Writer
Comedy writer Max Shulman, creator of Dobie Gillis and author of numerous books and screenplays, died of cancer Sunday at his Hollywood home. He was 69. The son of a Russian immigrant house painter, Shulman started his literary career writing for the campus humor magazine as an undergraduate at the University of Minnesota. A Doubleday editor was so impressed with the young writer that he encouraged Shulman to write his first novel, "Barefoot Boy With Cheek," published in 1943.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1999
This year, the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. has bestowed its career achievement award on two legends from one of Hollywood's darker chapters--screenwriter Julius Epstein and writer-director Abraham Polonsky, both of whom were blacklisted in 1951. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art will screen four films over two nights that represent the best of Epstein and Polonsky's work.
OPINION
May 21, 2000
The studios don't have much sympathy for the old writers and other creative talent who helped build the film and television industry. The companies insist on sticking to contracts negotiated before 1960 in which the artists signed away their rights to payment for reruns. But the studios have wanted and have gotten new laws passed to extend their copyright protection, and they push governments around the globe to make sure no royalties go unpaid.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1987 | DAVID CROOK, Times Staff Writer
As Hollywood involvement in the weeklong "Entertainment Summit" between American and Soviet film makers drew to a close Wednesday, participants looked hopefully toward a cooperative future. Columbia Pictures chief David Puttnam, a Briton, was among those attending a press conference Wednesday at Le Bel Age Hotel in West Hollywood where a broad 20-point plan pointing to further cooperation between the two film communities was issued.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Still no word on "Evita." With a nod to the ongoing financial woes at Jerry Weintraub Productions--which has the film rights--writer/director Oliver Stone mused, "My deepest hope is that if it isn't doable now, that I could do it later." Stone, who has spent 2 1/2 years with the project--and has scouted locales in Argentina, Spain and Italy--predicts: "Everything's going to come to a head--one way or the other--in September."
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