Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJulius Hemphill
IN THE NEWS

Julius Hemphill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Julius Hemphill, 57, an influential saxophonist and composer who helped found the World Saxophone Quartet. Hemphill's compositions and arrangements had a rich big-band sound but remained squarely in the tradition of black music and the blues. A native of Ft. Worth, he moved in 1966 to St. Louis, where he helped found the Black Artist Group. In 1972, Hemphill recorded two albums, "Dogon A.D." and "Coon Bid'ness."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
The last performances of Julius Hemphill, who died Sunday in Manhattan at age 57, were arduous experiences, both for him and his audiences. The saxophonist-composer, once a vigorous and outgoing performer, lost a leg a few years ago as the result of complications from diabetes, and in his most recent appearances looked wan and detached as he played his instruments from a wheelchair.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * * 1/2 Julius Hemphill, "Fat Man and the Hard Blues," Soul Note. Hemphill used to be the chief composer for the World Saxophone Quartet, so it's not surprising that his new sextet also boasts an all-reed lineup. What is surprising is that the varied music here throws Hemphill's trademarks--lushly eerie or mellifluous ensemble voicings blended with hard, blues-tinged riffing and collective improvisations--into sharper, more streamlined relief.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Julius Hemphill, 57, an influential saxophonist and composer who helped found the World Saxophone Quartet. Hemphill's compositions and arrangements had a rich big-band sound but remained squarely in the tradition of black music and the blues. A native of Ft. Worth, he moved in 1966 to St. Louis, where he helped found the Black Artist Group. In 1972, Hemphill recorded two albums, "Dogon A.D." and "Coon Bid'ness."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
The last performances of Julius Hemphill, who died Sunday in Manhattan at age 57, were arduous experiences, both for him and his audiences. The saxophonist-composer, once a vigorous and outgoing performer, lost a leg a few years ago as the result of complications from diabetes, and in his most recent appearances looked wan and detached as he played his instruments from a wheelchair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart is a regular jazz contributor to The Times.
When choreographer Bill T. Jones hired saxophonist and composer Julius Hemphill to write the score for his epic "The Last Supper at Uncle Tom's Cabin/The Promised Land," he had just a few requests. "At one point, he wanted a few bars of ' 'Round Midnight,' " remembers Hemphill. "At another he wanted some of an arrangement of 'Let's Get It On' that I had done. At some point, he wanted 'The Battle Hymn of the Republic.'
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
** 1/2 World Saxophone Quartet and African Drums, "Metamorphosis," Elektra Nonesuch. This is the first WSQ recording with Arthur Blythe--he replaced founding member Julius Hemphill, who left the group last year--and with outside musicians. Sometimes the three African drummers are smoothly integrated with the horns, but more often they seem grafted on.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bessie Winners: David Gordon and Julius Hemphill were among the 29 winners of a Bessie Award given out Friday in New York City. Gordon's work, "The Mysteries and What's So Funny," and Hemphill's music in Bill T. Jones' "Last Supper at Uncle Tom's Cabin/The Promised Land" were cited in categories ranging from performance to composing to visual design.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994 | Don Snowden
WORLD SAXOPHONE QUARTET "Moving Right Along" Black Saint * * * The World Saxophone Quartet finessed the departure of chief composer Julius Hemphill by recording with African drummers on its last album four years ago. With Eric Person now in the lineup (veteran James Spaulding is featured on two tracks here), the group returns with more focus on sonorous ensemble harmonies and riff-anchored pieces than fierce collective improvisations or the dense harmonic intricacy of Hemphill's works.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
It is curious that when four saxophonists get together to play jazz without a rhythm section, the rhythm may become more pronounced than if drums and bass were there. So it was Saturday evening when the World Saxophone Quartet took to the stage of Hollywood's Palace Court in march time, with baritone saxophonist Hamiet Bluiett beating out a strident rhythm as his cohorts vacillated between melody and wildly improvised cacophony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor) to four (excellent).
* * * 1/2 Julius Hemphill, "Fat Man and the Hard Blues," Soul Note. Hemphill used to be the chief composer for the World Saxophone Quartet, so it's not surprising that his new sextet also boasts an all-reed lineup. What is surprising is that the varied music here throws Hemphill's trademarks--lushly eerie or mellifluous ensemble voicings blended with hard, blues-tinged riffing and collective improvisations--into sharper, more streamlined relief.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart is a regular jazz contributor to The Times.
When choreographer Bill T. Jones hired saxophonist and composer Julius Hemphill to write the score for his epic "The Last Supper at Uncle Tom's Cabin/The Promised Land," he had just a few requests. "At one point, he wanted a few bars of ' 'Round Midnight,' " remembers Hemphill. "At another he wanted some of an arrangement of 'Let's Get It On' that I had done. At some point, he wanted 'The Battle Hymn of the Republic.'
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
"I was ready creatively and technically to deal with being the main voice in a trio," says local guitarist Nels Cline of his decision three years ago to form the unit featured on his new Enja album, "Silencer." Cline appears with his band today at Bogart's in Long Beach. The eclectic array of influences Cline and trio mates Mark London Sims (bass guitar) and Michael Preussner (drums) draw on for their electric forays don't add up to another grab bag of tired fusion formulas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|