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Julius M Title

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BUSINESS
November 17, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled that the former manager of actor Jason Behr still holds a valid contract and left it to another court to decide whether the UPN television star owes commissions. However, in a ruling released Friday, Judge Julius M. Title did not resolve the broader legal issue of how far talent managers can go to land jobs for their clients.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
A state appellate court has turned down a bid by J. Ronald Getty, 57, for a larger share in his oil-wealthy family's multibillion-dollar trust, agreeing with a lower court judge that he waited too long to do something about it. The eldest living son of the late J. Paul Getty had sued to "equalize" the terms of the trust drawn up in 1934 by his father and grandmother, Sarah C. Getty, which left him only $3,000 a year while three other J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Retired Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Julius M. Title, who was the oldest retired judge assigned by the state to hear cases, died of heart failure Sunday at his home in Cheviot Hills. He was 93. A former real estate lawyer, Title was appointed to Los Angeles Municipal Court by Gov. Pat Brown in 1966 and elevated to Superior Court by Gov. Ronald Reagan in 1970. He formally retired in 1985 but quickly found that retirement did not suit him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Some time this afternoon, Judge Julius M. Title, 91 years old, with hearing aids in both ears but a back that's still ramrod straight, will leave the bench for the last time. Or maybe not. Because come Monday morning, Title, who was appointed to the bench in 1966 and is being forced off, said he plans to start looking for another job.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outcome of a low-profile court case between an up-and-coming actor and his former manager could send a huge jolt through the working class of Hollywood, where managers are already antsy over a new push to criminalize much of what they do. At issue is whether the state should further limit the role that Hollywood managers play in finding jobs for their actor clients. California has the nation's most stringent constraints on managers in the form of the Talent Agencies Act, legal experts say.
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