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Julius Malema

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WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
  The African National Congress expelled Julius Malema, the president of its youth wing, on Wednesday for sowing divisions and bringing disrepute to the South African ruling party. The controversial Malema clashed with the leadership of the ANC and lost. His problems are not over: Multiple investigations of his alleged financial misdeeds are underway. Wednesday's decision is subject to appeal but, if upheld, would leave Malema little alternative but to start his own party.
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WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
PRETORIA, South Africa - Huge queues of people waited, some of them for two days, to see the body of former South African President Nelson Mandela lying in state in Pretoria. But thousands more were turned away disappointed as viewing ended Friday. Tempers frayed and scuffles broke out in front of the Union Buildings, the seat of government, where the casket spent three days, and at locations where people lined up to take shuttle buses to the site. Police were deployed to control the crowds, with some people trying to break through police barricades at the Union Buildings to get to see the body.
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WORLD
June 17, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Julius Malema, the ambitious, firebrand leader of the South African ruling party's youth wing, Thursday called for the nationalization of mines and seizure of land without compensation — policies the government has repeatedly ruled out in the past. Speaking at the African National Congress Youth League's electoral conference, Malema said the youth league had put nationalization and land seizures on the agenda. He has also pushed bank nationalization in the past. Malema faces a leadership challenge, but is expected to be reelected and his nationalization drive will probably gather steam in the lead-up to next year's ANC national conference, which sets policies for the party.
WORLD
December 10, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
SOWETO, South Africa -- When South African President Jacob Zuma walked into the stadium for the memorial service of Nelson Mandela, he drew a cheer from the ruling African National Congress crowd. But then little by little, the booing started. In what should have been Zuma's finest hour, the people were jeering him. And not at some unruly ANC conference. They chose one of the most momentous events in recent South African history, with more than 100 foreign dignitaries and the entire Mandela clan watching.
WORLD
August 29, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
He's been called "the black man who is rude about whites," a South African Sarah Palin, a "dictator-in-waiting. " But even his critics will say this about Julius Malema: The leader of the ruling party's youth league might be the most influential person in the country. The divisive populist has exposed fault lines not only in a society still raw from the racial injustices of apartheid, but those in the African National Congress itself after 17 years of post-apartheid rule. Malema, who faces an ANC disciplinary hearing Tuesday on potential corruption charges, has triggered an almighty struggle for the soul of the party, igniting a policy debate on nationalization of mines and banks and Zimbabwe-style land seizures that business analysts and even government ministers warn would be ruinous to the country's economy.
WORLD
August 3, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Hate speech or free speech? A South African newspaper columnist was fired Tuesday for writing that an editor at another publication was a "black snake in the grass" working for white masters and probably would have been burned as punishment during the struggle against apartheid. The editor of the City Press, Ferial Haffajee, published an article last week detailing alleged corruption by Julius Malema, the polarizing youth wing leader of the ruling African National Congress.
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A 29-year-old farmworker was convicted Tuesday of the murder of South African white supremacist leader Eugene TerreBlanche, but his teenage companion was acquitted in the killing, which had sparked fears of racial violence. Chris Mahlangu was found guilty of killing TerreBlanche, his employer and longtime advocate of a separate state for white Afrikaners. Patrick Ndlovu, 18, who was 15 and present at the slaying, was found guilty of housebreaking with intent to steal.
OPINION
June 1, 2010
Sixteen years after the end of apartheid, South Africa is at a crossroads. The country that was ushered into black majority rule by African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela has held four free and fair national elections since 1994, conducted a pioneering truth-and-reconciliation process, established a respectable multiracial judiciary and maintained a robust free press. The competence and integrity of successive ANC governments have been called into question, but not their fundamental legitimacy.
WORLD
April 10, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
Shoot, shoot. Shoot the Boer. Shoot, shoot. Shoot the Boer. Shoot, shoot. -- From an apartheid-era song revived recently by African National Congress youth leader Julius Malema :: It was a terrible week for race relations in South Africa. Exhibit A: A photo of a bloody tooth of slain white supremacist Eugene TerreBlanche knocked out during his killing, splashed across front pages of newspapers. Exhibit B: The expensive court battle on whether the song calling for the killing of Boers, referring to white farmers, is hate speech or a noble part of the history of liberation from a racist regime.
WORLD
September 21, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The worst thing about growing up a bookworm in a South African squatter camp wasn't the dearth of books. Reading was "un-African," William Gumede remembers. It wasn't manly, like sports or kite-flying. So if you did get your hands on a book, you'd better have a good place to hide it, or you'd get a beating and see your book ripped up. The day he heard that a mobile library was coming to a nearby township in Eastern Cape province, he and a friend walked miles to see it, and the library card he was given changed his life.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
ETWATWA, South Africa — The news that police killed 34 strikers at a platinum mine last month brought back painful memories for residents of this shantytown near Johannesburg — not of the apartheid era, but of more recent confrontations here with police. Residents angered by the inability of the government to improve their lives were summoned to the office of the local councilor, a stalwart of the African National Congress, they recalled. The official promised to put their names on a list for new housing.
WORLD
May 23, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A 29-year-old farmworker was convicted Tuesday of the murder of South African white supremacist leader Eugene TerreBlanche, but his teenage companion was acquitted in the killing, which had sparked fears of racial violence. Chris Mahlangu was found guilty of killing TerreBlanche, his employer and longtime advocate of a separate state for white Afrikaners. Patrick Ndlovu, 18, who was 15 and present at the slaying, was found guilty of housebreaking with intent to steal.
WORLD
March 1, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
  The African National Congress expelled Julius Malema, the president of its youth wing, on Wednesday for sowing divisions and bringing disrepute to the South African ruling party. The controversial Malema clashed with the leadership of the ANC and lost. His problems are not over: Multiple investigations of his alleged financial misdeeds are underway. Wednesday's decision is subject to appeal but, if upheld, would leave Malema little alternative but to start his own party.
WORLD
September 21, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The worst thing about growing up a bookworm in a South African squatter camp wasn't the dearth of books. Reading was "un-African," William Gumede remembers. It wasn't manly, like sports or kite-flying. So if you did get your hands on a book, you'd better have a good place to hide it, or you'd get a beating and see your book ripped up. The day he heard that a mobile library was coming to a nearby township in Eastern Cape province, he and a friend walked miles to see it, and the library card he was given changed his life.
WORLD
September 13, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The South African ruling party's controversial youth leader was found guilty Monday of hate speech for singing "Shoot the Boer," an apartheid-era song calling for killing white farmers. It was the second conviction under the Equality Act for Julius Malema, whose divisive rhetoric has upset people as varied as conservative whites and leaders of his own party. The law bans the use of hate speech designed to hurt or threaten any group based on race or sexual orientation. Malema, one of President Jacob Zuma's sharpest critics, is also facing an unrelated disciplinary hearing this week before the ruling African National Congress for accusations of sowing division within the party.
WORLD
August 29, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
He's been called "the black man who is rude about whites," a South African Sarah Palin, a "dictator-in-waiting. " But even his critics will say this about Julius Malema: The leader of the ruling party's youth league might be the most influential person in the country. The divisive populist has exposed fault lines not only in a society still raw from the racial injustices of apartheid, but those in the African National Congress itself after 17 years of post-apartheid rule. Malema, who faces an ANC disciplinary hearing Tuesday on potential corruption charges, has triggered an almighty struggle for the soul of the party, igniting a policy debate on nationalization of mines and banks and Zimbabwe-style land seizures that business analysts and even government ministers warn would be ruinous to the country's economy.
WORLD
August 26, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
As South African runner Caster Semenya returned home Tuesday to a hero's welcome, President Jacob Zuma chastised the International Assn. of Athletics Federations over gender tests carried out on the athlete and declared there was no way she would be stripped of her gold medal in the women's 800-meter world championship. Thousands of people came to celebrate the 18-year-old Semenya's return at O.R. Tambo International Airport -- and to vent their anger at what they see as her ill treatment.
WORLD
May 13, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The song's called "Revolutionary House" and it's gone viral. But its creator is difficult to track down. It takes several probes on Twitter, a lead from YouTube, an Internet search full of blind alleys, some e-mails and a couple of cold calls to strangers with online pseudonyms before someone responds with a tweet. Eventually, a call comes. "I'm the one you want," says a deep voice. Hours later, David Law, 25, with disobedient, bristly hair and solemn eyes, turns up for an interview in a shopping mall.
WORLD
August 3, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Hate speech or free speech? A South African newspaper columnist was fired Tuesday for writing that an editor at another publication was a "black snake in the grass" working for white masters and probably would have been burned as punishment during the struggle against apartheid. The editor of the City Press, Ferial Haffajee, published an article last week detailing alleged corruption by Julius Malema, the polarizing youth wing leader of the ruling African National Congress.
WORLD
June 17, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Julius Malema, the ambitious, firebrand leader of the South African ruling party's youth wing, Thursday called for the nationalization of mines and seizure of land without compensation — policies the government has repeatedly ruled out in the past. Speaking at the African National Congress Youth League's electoral conference, Malema said the youth league had put nationalization and land seizures on the agenda. He has also pushed bank nationalization in the past. Malema faces a leadership challenge, but is expected to be reelected and his nationalization drive will probably gather steam in the lead-up to next year's ANC national conference, which sets policies for the party.
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