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Julius Rosenberg

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OPINION
August 12, 2013 | Robert Meeropol
  Afew weeks from now, a military judge will probably sentence Bradley Manning to serve several decades in prison for violating the Espionage Act of 1917. I feel a kinship with him. My parents, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, were convicted of violating the same act in 1951. They were executed two years later, when I was 6. That's only the beginning of my sense of connection with Manning. The prosecutors, and now the judge, have labeled his actions espionage, theft or other unsavory terms.
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OPINION
August 12, 2013 | Robert Meeropol
  Afew weeks from now, a military judge will probably sentence Bradley Manning to serve several decades in prison for violating the Espionage Act of 1917. I feel a kinship with him. My parents, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, were convicted of violating the same act in 1951. They were executed two years later, when I was 6. That's only the beginning of my sense of connection with Manning. The prosecutors, and now the judge, have labeled his actions espionage, theft or other unsavory terms.
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NEWS
March 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Breaking decades of silence on perhaps the most sensational espionage case of the Cold War, a retired Soviet spy says Julius Rosenberg helped organize a 1940s espionage ring for Moscow but was not directly involved in stealing U.S. secrets about the atomic bomb. Rosenberg and his wife, Ethel, were executed in the Sing Sing electric chair in 1953 for what then-FBI Director J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Walter Schneir, 81, whose 1965 book "Invitation to an Inquest" on the Rosenberg spy case firmly proclaimed their innocence, died April 11 of thyroid cancer at his home in Pleasantville, N.Y., the New York Times reported. Written with his wife Miriam, the book reignited the debate over whether Julius Rosenberg and his wife Ethel committed espionage by giving U.S. nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in March 1951 and executed June 19, 1953.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Walter Schneir, 81, whose 1965 book "Invitation to an Inquest" on the Rosenberg spy case firmly proclaimed their innocence, died April 11 of thyroid cancer at his home in Pleasantville, N.Y., the New York Times reported. Written with his wife Miriam, the book reignited the debate over whether Julius Rosenberg and his wife Ethel committed espionage by giving U.S. nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union. The Rosenbergs were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage in March 1951 and executed June 19, 1953.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the release of key secret grand jury testimony in the atomic spy trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, citing its value to historians in the debate over national security versus freedom. The ruling from U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein pertained to witnesses whose sealed testimony was taken in 1950 and '52. The witnesses have not consented to the release or could not be located. The Rosenbergs were convicted of passing nuclear weapons secrets to the Soviet Union and were executed in 1953.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995 | ALAN M. DERSHOWITZ
The recent disclosure of intercepted Soviet intelligence messages that link Julius Rosenberg to atomic espionage should not allay the conscience of the American legal system. The execution of Rosenberg and his wife, Ethel, in 1953 remains a serious blemish on the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Justice Department and--worst of all--the judiciary. Just because Julius Rosenberg was guilty of spying for the Soviet Union does not mean that he was not also framed.
OPINION
September 22, 2008
Re "Case closed on the Rosenbergs," Opinion, Sept. 17 Professor Ronald Radosh's evident glee that the case against Julius Rosenberg is -- after only a few decades -- clearly resolved suggests a myopic academic's ethical callousness and flip dismissal of the major political issue. We now have, as Radosh barely admits, more evidence of Ethel Rosenberg's innocence or, at worst, the prosecution's lack of credible evidence to convict. The state killed a Jewish woman without warrant or due process, and Radosh finds this to be a cause for celebration.
OPINION
October 11, 2008
Re "The essential lessons of the Rosenberg case," Opinion, Oct. 5 Michael and Robert Meeropol correctly point out that recently released grand jury testimony supports long-standing criticisms of the fairness of their parents' prosecution. The trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and Morton Sobell was a travesty of justice, and the Rosenbergs' execution was a tragedy. That said, the historical record does not bear out their statement that "there is no clear proof to this day of the value of the military/industrial information that [Julius Rosenberg]
BOOKS
November 11, 2001 | ALLEN WEINSTEIN, Allen Weinstein is the author of "Perjury: The Hiss - Chambers Case" and "The Haunted Wood: Soviet Espionage in America--The Stalin Era" with Alexander Vassiliev
They were all guilty, Arthur Koestler wrote in "Darkness at Noon" about the old Bolshevik leaders trapped in the infamous Moscow trials of 1936-1939, but not of the crimes for which they were charged. The statement might also be applied to convicted "atom spy" Ethel Rosenberg, whose 1953 execution with her husband Julius occasioned the hyperbolic subtitle of "The Brother," Sam Roberts' book on their chief accuser and Ethel Rosenberg's brother, David Greenglass.
OPINION
October 11, 2008
Re "The essential lessons of the Rosenberg case," Opinion, Oct. 5 Michael and Robert Meeropol correctly point out that recently released grand jury testimony supports long-standing criticisms of the fairness of their parents' prosecution. The trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and Morton Sobell was a travesty of justice, and the Rosenbergs' execution was a tragedy. That said, the historical record does not bear out their statement that "there is no clear proof to this day of the value of the military/industrial information that [Julius Rosenberg]
OPINION
September 22, 2008
Re "Case closed on the Rosenbergs," Opinion, Sept. 17 Professor Ronald Radosh's evident glee that the case against Julius Rosenberg is -- after only a few decades -- clearly resolved suggests a myopic academic's ethical callousness and flip dismissal of the major political issue. We now have, as Radosh barely admits, more evidence of Ethel Rosenberg's innocence or, at worst, the prosecution's lack of credible evidence to convict. The state killed a Jewish woman without warrant or due process, and Radosh finds this to be a cause for celebration.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge ordered the release of key secret grand jury testimony in the atomic spy trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, citing its value to historians in the debate over national security versus freedom. The ruling from U.S. District Judge Alvin Hellerstein pertained to witnesses whose sealed testimony was taken in 1950 and '52. The witnesses have not consented to the release or could not be located. The Rosenbergs were convicted of passing nuclear weapons secrets to the Soviet Union and were executed in 1953.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alexander Feklisov, a KGB master agent who handled some of Moscow's most damaging Cold War spies in the West -- Klaus Fuchs and the Rosenbergs -- has died. He was 93. Feklisov, who also played a key role as a mediator during the Cuban missile crisis, died Friday, said a spokesman for Russia's foreign intelligence service. A cause of death was not given. For years, Feklisov had kept an apartment in Moscow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
It was a name that was whispered, always whispered. The Rosenbergs, the Rosenbergs, the Rosenbergs. Growing up Jewish in Brooklyn in the 1950s, the story of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg -- convicted of giving the secret of the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union, sent to the electric chair in 1953 at the height of Cold War anticommunist hysteria, proclaiming their innocence to the end -- was terrifying to children as well as to their parents.
OPINION
June 19, 2003 | Ronald Radosh, Ronald Radosh, a senior adjunct fellow at the Hudson Institute, is co-author of "The Rosenberg File" (Yale University Press, 1997).
Fifty years ago on this date, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed for "conspiracy to commit espionage." Historians have reached a consensus about this case: that the death sentence was unwarranted and horrendous, particularly against Ethel Rosenberg. However, it has been established beyond the shadow of a doubt that both Rosenbergs were knowing participants or accessories to a major Soviet espionage ring.
OPINION
June 19, 2003 | Ronald Radosh, Ronald Radosh, a senior adjunct fellow at the Hudson Institute, is co-author of "The Rosenberg File" (Yale University Press, 1997).
Fifty years ago on this date, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed for "conspiracy to commit espionage." Historians have reached a consensus about this case: that the death sentence was unwarranted and horrendous, particularly against Ethel Rosenberg. However, it has been established beyond the shadow of a doubt that both Rosenbergs were knowing participants or accessories to a major Soviet espionage ring.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing startling evidence on one of the most divisive controversies of the Cold War, intelligence officials revealed Tuesday that the U.S. investigation that led to the executions of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg in 1953 was based on intercepted Soviet messages that identified them as atomic spies.
BOOKS
November 11, 2001 | ALLEN WEINSTEIN, Allen Weinstein is the author of "Perjury: The Hiss - Chambers Case" and "The Haunted Wood: Soviet Espionage in America--The Stalin Era" with Alexander Vassiliev
They were all guilty, Arthur Koestler wrote in "Darkness at Noon" about the old Bolshevik leaders trapped in the infamous Moscow trials of 1936-1939, but not of the crimes for which they were charged. The statement might also be applied to convicted "atom spy" Ethel Rosenberg, whose 1953 execution with her husband Julius occasioned the hyperbolic subtitle of "The Brother," Sam Roberts' book on their chief accuser and Ethel Rosenberg's brother, David Greenglass.
NEWS
March 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Breaking decades of silence on perhaps the most sensational espionage case of the Cold War, a retired Soviet spy says Julius Rosenberg helped organize a 1940s espionage ring for Moscow but was not directly involved in stealing U.S. secrets about the atomic bomb. Rosenberg and his wife, Ethel, were executed in the Sing Sing electric chair in 1953 for what then-FBI Director J.
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