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Julius Sumner Miller

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April 16, 1987 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
Julius Sumner Miller, a heralded physicist known on television as "Professor Wonderful" to millions of children on the 1950s "Mickey Mouse Club," as a strict taskmaster to students in his classroom and most recently as a critic of what he saw as America's intellectual decline, has died at his Torrance home. He was 78 and told a reporter in his last interview two weeks ago that he had been diagnosed with leukemia early in March. "I'm gravely ill and waiting for death," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2001
Judith S. Gillies' article about a fun/educational TV program delights me ("Learning to Make the Difficult Easy," Jan. 2). Shades of Julius Sumner Miller! In the mid-'50s, he had a program on TV every Sunday afternoon about physics. Not only was it enlightening, it was fun. Several of us recent engineering grads got together week after week to watch it, even though the material was fresh in our minds. I've never seen anything like it since. Unfortunately, live programs in those days weren't recorded, but maybe the scripts still exist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2001
Judith S. Gillies' article about a fun/educational TV program delights me ("Learning to Make the Difficult Easy," Jan. 2). Shades of Julius Sumner Miller! In the mid-'50s, he had a program on TV every Sunday afternoon about physics. Not only was it enlightening, it was fun. Several of us recent engineering grads got together week after week to watch it, even though the material was fresh in our minds. I've never seen anything like it since. Unfortunately, live programs in those days weren't recorded, but maybe the scripts still exist.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
Julius Sumner Miller, a heralded physicist known on television as "Professor Wonderful" to millions of children on the 1950s "Mickey Mouse Club," as a strict taskmaster to students in his classroom and most recently as a critic of what he saw as America's intellectual decline, has died at his Torrance home. He was 78 and told a reporter in his last interview two weeks ago that he had been diagnosed with leukemia early in March. "I'm gravely ill and waiting for death," he said.
NEWS
April 12, 1987
I wish you to know that I think very highly of Gerald Faris' story, "Testy Prof. Wonderful Sees Only Darkness in Intellectual Decay," (Times, April 5). It needs a slight emendation; you spoke of my last lecture in Australia as being the 1,459th. This suggests that I have given only 1,459 lectures. This is cruelty to my history. It is 1,459 lectures outside the classroom and outside of my TV programs around the world. I have given over 20,000 lectures in the classroom and some 2,000 television programs around the world on my demonstrations.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
In his glory days as the wizard of physics on television, in the classroom and in lecture halls, Julius Sumner Miller used to shout, leap and wave his arms. A pithy phrase from a Greek or Roman philosopher was always on the tip of his tongue. He used showmanship to tickle the imagination and challenge the intellect, and he insisted that the basic principles of physics--mystifying to many--can be demonstrated with such simple things as children's toys or kitchen devices.
NEWS
April 12, 1987
I wish you to know that I think very highly of Gerald Faris' story, "Testy Prof. Wonderful Sees Only Darkness in Intellectual Decay," (Times, April 5). It needs a slight emendation; you spoke of my last lecture in Australia as being the 1,459th. This suggests that I have given only 1,459 lectures. This is cruelty to my history. It is 1,459 lectures outside the classroom and outside of my TV programs around the world. I have given over 20,000 lectures in the classroom and some 2,000 television programs around the world on my demonstrations.
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