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Juma Ikangaa

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SPORTS
March 2, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was at the front of the line in Boston, leading an invasion of Africans who have taken over its marathon. He was also in front in New York, running the marathon there faster than anyone else has ever run it. He was out front in Tokyo and Fukuoka, Japan, and Beijing, and still he asks himself the same question daily as he prepares to run at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro: "Why do I torture myself to run 26 miles 385 yards this fast?" How fast?
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SPORTS
November 6, 1989 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sunday's New York City Marathon a torch was ignited and a light was sustained. Two wily veterans, Ingrid Kristiansen of Norway and Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania--runners for whom consistency is a hallmark--won their races and added another chapter to their already astonishing careers. Two Americans--Kim Jones of Spokane, Wash. and Ken Martin of Santa Fe, N.M.
SPORTS
April 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Abebe Mekonnen missed last year's Boston Marathon because of Ethiopia's boycott. Nothing stopped him from winning it today. Mekonnen pulled away from Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania, the runner-up for the second consecutive year, with about 1 1/2 miles left for a 48-second victory on a warm, sunny day. The winning time of two hours, nine minutes, six seconds is the seventh fastest in Boston's 93-race history. Ingrid Kristiansen of Norway, the world's fastest women's marathoner and the 1986 winner in Boston, won her race easily in 2:24:33.
SPORTS
November 6, 1989 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Sunday's New York City Marathon a torch was ignited and a light was sustained. Two wily veterans, Ingrid Kristiansen of Norway and Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania--runners for whom consistency is a hallmark--won their races and added another chapter to their already astonishing careers. Two Americans--Kim Jones of Spokane, Wash. and Ken Martin of Santa Fe, N.M.
SPORTS
March 2, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was at the front of the line in Boston, leading an invasion of Africans who have taken over its marathon. He was also in front in New York, running the marathon there faster than anyone else has ever run it. He was out front in Tokyo and Fukuoka, Japan, and Beijing, and still he asks himself the same question daily as he prepares to run at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro: "Why do I torture myself to run 26 miles 385 yards this fast?" How fast?
SPORTS
November 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania, the 1989 champion; Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya, the 1987 winner, and John Treacy of Ireland, the 1984 Olympic silver medalist, will be in the field today for the New York Marathon. Joan Benoit Samuelson, the 1984 Olympic gold medalist and American record-holder, and Lisa Ondieki of Australia, the fastest women's marathoner in an all-women's race, are the top female entries.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Associated Press
Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya beat Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania by one second today in the 92nd Boston Marathon, becoming the first African to win the event in its closest finish ever. Hussein, winner of last November's New York City Marathon, edged past Ikangaa with about 100 yards to go. Hussein completed the 26-mile, 385-yard, rain-soaked course in 2 hours, 8 minutes, 43 seconds, the second-fastest in Boston history.
SPORTS
April 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Abebe Mekonnen missed last year's Boston Marathon because of Ethiopia's boycott. Nothing stopped him from winning it today. Mekonnen pulled away from Juma Ikangaa of Tanzania, the runner-up for the second consecutive year, with about 1 1/2 miles left for a 48-second victory on a warm, sunny day. The winning time of two hours, nine minutes, six seconds is the seventh fastest in Boston's 93-race history. Ingrid Kristiansen of Norway, the world's fastest women's marathoner and the 1986 winner in Boston, won her race easily in 2:24:33.
SPORTS
April 18, 1988 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
They've been calling this year's Boston Marathon a dual between Tanzania and Kenya, because both countries have sent their finest athletes--among the fastest in the world--here, but the field lining up at 9 a.m., PDT, today in Hopkinton, Mass., is even better than that. It also includes top runners from Italy, Great Britain, Mexico and Japan, not to mention Rosa Mota, of Portugal, the third-fastest female marathoner in history. With Americans skipping Boston in favor of the upcoming U.S.
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