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June Christy

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NEWS
June 23, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June Christy, who gained fame as vocalist with the Stan Kenton orchestra in the 1940s and earned the label "the grande dame of modern jazz singing," has died. She was 64. Miss Christy died Thursday night from complications of kidney failure at her Sherman Oaks home, her husband, tenor saxophonist Bob Cooper, said Friday. Times jazz critic Leonard Feather gave Miss Christy the "grande dame" tag during one of her stints at the former Hong Kong Bar in the Century Plaza Hotel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Jazz record companies aren't always the most masterful marketing planners. But it doesn't take an MBA from Stanford to know that the holiday season is a great time to release boxed sets--especially by major artists. So it's no surprise that some attractive new jazz packages are arriving, just in time for the gift-buying rush. In terms of sheer size, "The Blue Note Years" has to take the gold ring.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
A great pop-jazz singer who's never really received the acclaim she deserves. That voice--cool, sultry and with a touch of gravel--was considered too slight by some. But she sure sounds full-bodied in this package of gems, mostly from the late '50s, including "How High the Moon," "Midnight Sun" and one of the best versions of "Bewitched" ever recorded. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (e x cellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | DENNIS HUNT
A great pop-jazz singer who's never really received the acclaim she deserves. That voice--cool, sultry and with a touch of gravel--was considered too slight by some. But she sure sounds full-bodied in this package of gems, mostly from the late '50s, including "How High the Moon," "Midnight Sun" and one of the best versions of "Bewitched" ever recorded. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (e x cellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Jazz record companies aren't always the most masterful marketing planners. But it doesn't take an MBA from Stanford to know that the holiday season is a great time to release boxed sets--especially by major artists. So it's no surprise that some attractive new jazz packages are arriving, just in time for the gift-buying rush. In terms of sheer size, "The Blue Note Years" has to take the gold ring.
NEWS
June 28, 1986
Joseph Perkins Greene, a composer and lyricist whose best-known works came through his collaboration with Stan Kenton during that bandleader's glory years of the 1940s and '50s, has died in a Pasadena hospital. The writer of "Across the Alley From the Alamo," "And Her Tears Flowed Like Wine" and "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying," popularized by Kenton vocalists June Christy and Chris Connor, was 71 and died of kidney failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1993 | DENNIS HUNT
The specter of the late Nat King Cole loomed over daughter Natalie's 1991 album "Unforgettable--With Love," which boasted sleek remakes of his best songs from the pre-1960 era. But this time she's on her own, without foolproof material of her father's to attract fans--and she does fine. Now well established in this romantic genre, sounding like a cross between Sarah Vaughan and June Christy, she starts at a high level and never falters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Confession time over tea. British singer Corinne Drewery, of the pop group Swing Out Sister, reveals one of the most unsettling moments of her life: "It was when I finally realized I wasn't a soul singer," says Drewery, best known for "Breakout," the Top 10 single from the group's 1987 debut album, "It's Better to Travel." Drewery, 30, spent her late teens copying R&B singers such as Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross and Stevie Wonder. During her aborted soul-singing attempts, she ignored certain signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
While Ann Weldon was fulfilling TV and movie obligations as an actress, the screen's gain became music's loss. Happily, she is now back flexing her vocal muscles, handling the Sunday evening sessions at a restaurant called At Marty's in West Los Angeles, where a supper club entertainment policy was recently initiated, somewhat in the tradition of New York East Side rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fans of this region's jazz era of the 1950s and '60s had a chance to see and hear some of their favorite players in action Saturday night in "A Jazz West Coast Christmas" at the Hermosa Beach Playhouse. Among the many well-known artists appearing in this seasonal cornucopia were Conte and Pete Candoli, Dave Pell, Jack Montrose, Bob Enevoldsen, Med Flory and Pete Jolly. And, leading the program's three segments were saxophonist Bill Perkins and veteran arranger-composer Pete Rugolo.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June Christy, who gained fame as vocalist with the Stan Kenton orchestra in the 1940s and earned the label "the grande dame of modern jazz singing," has died. She was 64. Miss Christy died Thursday night from complications of kidney failure at her Sherman Oaks home, her husband, tenor saxophonist Bob Cooper, said Friday. Times jazz critic Leonard Feather gave Miss Christy the "grande dame" tag during one of her stints at the former Hong Kong Bar in the Century Plaza Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where does Mark Cantor find all these things? Year after year he presents a full evening of jazz on film to enthralled audiences as part of the free events leading up to the Playboy Jazz Festival (which takes place today and Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl). Thursday night, in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Bing Theater, Cantor did it again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Patti LuPone has been almost everywhere in the entertainment world, from recordings, film and television to Broadway musicals and dramas. But the one thing she hasn't done for the last 25 years is a cabaret show. So it wasn't surprising that there was just a whisper of hesitation in her opening numbers on Monday at Feinstein's at the Cinegrill.
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