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March 22, 1998
So as the sun declines below Detroit (the lake a cool assurance of alternatives to hard dark high-rise miscellaneous) the colors of the end of light relax along the horizontal edge of this blue place with burnt sienna rose and oranges that soften into regular domestic tragedies of night without a lover's willing face to stop the desperation of the chase for daytime stars that glint and blur and mix and lift like mica sprinkling on a concrete hierogylph of altered space where by himself a young
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NEWS
June 20, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let fly that graying mantra--"The personal is political"--and it scares up grainy icons of resistance: pickets, protest songs, afros huge as nimbuses. But for poet, essayist, teacher and activist June Jordan, who came of age as a woman and a writer in a moment when the once-powerless moved mountains, the merger of public and private was more than fashion. It was her foundation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June Jordan, a poet, essayist and influential UC Berkeley professor of African American studies, died Friday at her home in Berkeley. She was 65 and died of breast cancer, which she had been battling for much of the last decade. The woman of diverse talents wrote 28 books of poetry, essays and children's fiction since the late 1960s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
June Jordan, a poet, essayist and influential UC Berkeley professor of African American studies, died Friday at her home in Berkeley. She was 65 and died of breast cancer, which she had been battling for much of the last decade. The woman of diverse talents wrote 28 books of poetry, essays and children's fiction since the late 1960s.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the indelible memories summoned up by poet June Jordan in her memoir, "Soldier: A Poet's Childhood," is of being awakened in the middle of the night by a fist smashing into the side of her head. "Daddy!" she screams. "What did I do?" No answer is forthcoming, only more fierce blows and the words, "You damn black devil child!" One cannot imagine any self-respecting social worker nowadays who would not want to rescue a child from so abusive a parent.
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | PENELOPE MOFFET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES. Moffet is a Los Angeles writer
After a decade of struggle, UC Berkeley professor and writer June Jordan is, if not exactly in the mainstream, rising once again to the surface. The quality of her work has never been at issue.
NEWS
June 20, 2002 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let fly that graying mantra--"The personal is political"--and it scares up grainy icons of resistance: pickets, protest songs, afros huge as nimbuses. But for poet, essayist, teacher and activist June Jordan, who came of age as a woman and a writer in a moment when the once-powerless moved mountains, the merger of public and private was more than fashion. It was her foundation.
NEWS
October 21, 2004
Iconic theater director Peter Sellars is staging the U.S. premiere of his provocative coupling of French theater visionary Antonin Artaud's apocalyptic final text, "For an End to the Judgment of God," and poet June Jordan's "Kissing God Goodbye." Artaud's hallucinatory scourging of a war-worshipping America will be performed by noted L.A. theater artist John Malpede in the guise of a Pentagon official briefing the press on the government's war on terrorism.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1987
A number of noted personalities from the performing arts will participate in a continuing series of lectures and special events at the University of California, Santa Barbara, throughout the month of January. Writer June Jordan and composer Adrienne Torf will present "The Music of Poetry and the Poetry of Music," an evening of musical performance and poetry readings that deal with art and activism, on Monday at 8 p.m., . On Tuesday at 4 p.m.
NEWS
May 15, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the indelible memories summoned up by poet June Jordan in her memoir, "Soldier: A Poet's Childhood," is of being awakened in the middle of the night by a fist smashing into the side of her head. "Daddy!" she screams. "What did I do?" No answer is forthcoming, only more fierce blows and the words, "You damn black devil child!" One cannot imagine any self-respecting social worker nowadays who would not want to rescue a child from so abusive a parent.
BOOKS
March 22, 1998
So as the sun declines below Detroit (the lake a cool assurance of alternatives to hard dark high-rise miscellaneous) the colors of the end of light relax along the horizontal edge of this blue place with burnt sienna rose and oranges that soften into regular domestic tragedies of night without a lover's willing face to stop the desperation of the chase for daytime stars that glint and blur and mix and lift like mica sprinkling on a concrete hierogylph of altered space where by himself a young
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | PENELOPE MOFFET, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES. Moffet is a Los Angeles writer
After a decade of struggle, UC Berkeley professor and writer June Jordan is, if not exactly in the mainstream, rising once again to the surface. The quality of her work has never been at issue.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | REUTERS
An anonymous Florida bidder paid $200,000 at a glittering charity auction in Boston on Monday for a black evening gown once worn by Princess Diana. The black velvet dress designed by Bruce Oldfield was donated by Boston boutique owner Barbara Jordan, who paid $36,800 for the V-neck gown at a Christie's auction in June. Jordan said she believed the Florida bidder was the same woman who recently bought several other dresses owned by the late princess, but she declined to identify her.
BOOKS
August 14, 1994
There were a number of statements with which I strongly disagreed in David Ehrenstein's piece on E. Lynn Harris' novels "Invisible Life" and "Just As I Am" (July 10)--that Harris lacks a sense of humor, that he does not movingly and convincingly deal with the subject of AIDS, that the African-American community is hostile to the gay and lesbian movement. But my overriding concern is that Ehrenstein failed to give readers of your newspaper an actual review of either book. In his rush to put his agenda on the table, the reviewer managed to write an article that maligned African Americans (gay and straight)
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